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Publication numberUS2381218 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1945
Filing dateMay 30, 1944
Priority dateMay 30, 1944
Publication numberUS 2381218 A, US 2381218A, US-A-2381218, US2381218 A, US2381218A
InventorsJacob Ezckicl J
Original AssigneeBenjamin Liebowitz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pile fabric
US 2381218 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. J. JACOB 2,381,218

FILE FABRIC Filed May 30, 1944 Z5 4 INVENTOR.

BY z ggacw aQcui 4 W touching of the heated fabric Patented Aug. 7,- 1945 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE PILE FABRIC Eleklel J. Jacob, Brooklymhlllh, aaalgnor to Beniamin Llebowitl, New York, N. Y.

Application May :0, 1944, semi No. 53am 15 Claims.

The present application is a continuation in part of my copending United States patent appli- Serial No. 424,016, filed on December 22,

424,016 is a continuation United States patent application 394,895, filed May 23, 1941. This latter application is a continuation in part of my United States patent application 330,504, filed April 19, 1940.

in part of my prior My present invention relates to new. pile.

in providing a heat-protecting non-combustible pilefabric which is also adapted to be used for heating purposes.

Another object of my invention consists of a in which heating elements are incorporated in such a manner that any danger of burning by is avoided.

Still another object of my invention consists of a new electrically-heated to he used for various purposes, as for instance, for electrical hot pads, heated garments, aviator costumes, heated blankets, heated rugs and other heating means for rooms.

ith the above objects in view, my present invention mainly consists of a pile fabric having a fabric base and piles Droiecting from at least one face thereof, said fabric base made of non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments and line metallic wiresand said piles of non-oombustibie electrically insulating fine filaments only.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of my present invention, I use as non-=combustible electrically insulating fine filaments glass filamerits and me the fine metallic wires without any covering, i. c, without rubber or textile covering; and obtain in this way a pile fabric of glass filament yarn comprising uncovered metallic wires incorporated in the base of this fabric. Of course, it is also possibleto use besides glass other noncombustible electrically insulating filaments as pil fabric adapted This United States patent application 'new non-combustible heat-resistant pile fabric asbestos and filaments of plastic material fulfilling the same requirements.

I have found that by incorporating fine metallic wires into a pile fabric made of fine heatresistant electrically insulating glass filaments which simultaneously are also of relatively low heat conductivity, I am able to reduce the tendency of these glass filaments of relatively low heat conductivity to burn out when locally exposed to a temperature appreciably above that which the fabric can otherwise withstand. The reason therefore is that the fine metallic wires incorporated in the heat-resistant glass fabric are of relatively high heat conductivity and distribute the heat over a greater surface, thereby reducing the temperature at the .0Ver-exposed region. Thus the heat-resistant electrically insulating glass or similar filaments are protected from being melted or otherwis damaged.

Glass filaments are especially well-adapted for the purpose of this invention: glass is heatresistant and electrically insulating and can readily be drawn into extremely fine maments. It is of particular advantage that yarns made of such filaments can. be woven or knitted into fabrics. As an example of a specific embodiment', yarns which are very satisfactory for the present purposes may be made by twistin together approximately one hundred glass filaments, each or which has a diameter of the order of magnitude of a few ten-iihousandths of an inch; a number, e. g., six of the resulting yarns may he plied or twisted together to form the final yarn of which. the desired fabric may be made.

These glass filaments, or the yarns made thereof, form the main part of the new fabric. Incorlwrat'ed therein are the heat-resistant filaments of relatively high electric conductivity.

' I propose to use non-combustible fibres of duetile metals as, for instance, fine metallic wires as such filaments. Suitable metals for these wires are, e. g., nickel, nichrome, chromium-nickel alloys, iron-nickel alloys and other metals havin: suitable electrical and thermal conductivity and preferably high resistance to oxidation at elevated temperature.

In this drawins: 4

Figure l is a cross section ofa pile fabric woven in accordance with my present invention;

Figure 2 is a rear view of the pile fabric shown in Figure l; and

Figure 8 is a rear view of a modified embodiment of the fabric shown in Figures 1 and 2. used as heating fabric.

The pile fabric made according to my present invention and shown in Figures 1 and 2 consists of a fabric base and piles II. The piles it consist of glass or other non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments or yarn. The fabric base is made by interweaving, interknitting or interlacing glass or other non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments 1! with fine metallic wires 20 as shown in Figure 1 in cross section. Thus, the piles ll of the pile fabric conceal the wires 20 which are preferably uncovered, faciiitating manufacture of the fabric. The wires I! are thus spaced from the upper face 28 of the fabric; this fabric face 28 is called the pile face" of the fabric in the following description and claims.

In Figure 2, I how the pile fabric from the rear. As apparent from this figure. the fine metallic wires are spaced from each'othery preferably between each two wires at least one glass yarn is arranged, insulating these wires and preventing short circuits.

The fine metallic wires II preferably form spaced fillings of the fabric base as shown in Figure 8; however, I wish to stress that in Figure 2 the fine metallic wires may be either spaced fillings or spaced warp threads of the fabric base.

In any case, it is of' importance that the fine metallic wires 2! be spaced from each other. They are, furthermore, in accordance with my present invention, also spaced from the pile face 28 of the fabric by the piles ll consisting of electrically insulating material as glass or the like.

The fabric shown in Figure 3 is verysimilar to the one shown in Figures 1 or 2, the only differenoe is that the parallel fine. metallic wire portions are spaced by two fillings of insulating glass threads. The wire it is connected at its ends :4 and II with circuit ll which also includes the source of electric current 21. Due to its electric resistance, the wire II is heated by the electric current passing through it.

Fabrics of the above described type may be used for various heating purposes as for instance for heating rugs, heating wall coverings, heating pads, heated blankets, and other heating means.

This fabric may also be used for heat insulatin: purposes as for instance, for fireplace screens and fireplace linings and the like.

It should, however. be stressed that it-is also possible to use one and the same fabric for both Thus, for instance, it is possibleto use a fireplace screen consisting of a fabric of the above-described type alternately as heat insulating means in usual manner, or as heating device; in the latter case it is only necessary to connect. the ends of the wire or wires incorporated in the fabric of the screen with a source of electric current.

It should be stressed that I have found glass yarn especially adapted for the purposes of the present invention.

The specific embodiments abov are merely illustrative.

What I claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A heating fabric having a fabric base and pilesproiecting from at least one face t ereof,

shown and described asanais said fabric base consisting of fine metallicelectrically conductive wires and fine glass filaments, and said piles consisting of said fine glass filaments only, thus spacing said wires from the p le face of said fabric.

2. a heating fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least one face thereof,

said fabric base consisting of interwoven fine metallic electrically conductive 'wires and fine glass filaments, and said piles consisting of said fine glass filaments only, time spacing said wires from the pile face of said fabric.

3. A heating fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least one face thereof, said fabric base consisting of non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments and fine metallic electrically conductive wires, and said piles consisting of non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments only, thus spacing said wires from the pile face of said fabric.

4. A heating fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least one face thereof, said fabric base consisting of interwoven fine metallic electrically conductive wires and non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments and said piles consisting of non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments only, thus spacing said wires from the pile face of said fabric.

5. A woven pile fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least one face thereof, said piles consisting of glass filaments and said fabric base consisting of glass filaments and fine metallic electrically conductive wires incorporated in spaced fillings of the woven base of said pile fabric, spaced from the pile face of said fabric.

6. A pile fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least-one face thereof, said piles consisting of glass filaments and saidfabric base consisting of glass filaments and fine metallic 40 electrically conductive wires incorporated in the base of said fabric, spaced from the pile face of said pile fabric.

7. A woven pile fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least one face thereof, said piles consisting of glass filaments and said fabric base consisting of glass filaments and fine metallic electrically conductive wires forming spaced fillings of said fabric and being spaced from the pile face of said fabric.

8. A woven heating fabric comprising piles'of glass filaments and a fabric base consisting of glass filament yarn woven in consecutive fillings and fine metallic electrically conductive wires incorporated spaced from each other in at least part of said fillings spaced from the pile face of said fabric. 4 a

9. A pile fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least one face thereof, said fabric base consisting of fine uncovered electrically conductive metallic wires and fine glass filaments, and said piles consisting of said fine glam filaments only, thus spacing said wires from the pile face of said fabric.

10. A pile fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting fromat least one face thereof; said fabric base consisting of interwoven fine uncovered metallic wires and fine-glass filaments, and said pilesconsisting of said fine glass filaments only, thus spacing said wires from the pile face of said fabric.

11. A pile fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least one face thereof, said fabric base consisting of, non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments andfine uncovered electrically conductive metallic wires, and

said piles consisting of non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments only, thus spacing said wires from the pile face of said fabric.

12. A ile fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least one face thereof, said fabric base consisting of fine uncovered electrically conductive metallic wires and non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments and said piles consisting of non-combustible electrically insulating fine filaments only, thus spacing said wires from the pile faceof said fabric.

13. A woven heating pile fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least one face thereof, said piles consisting of glass filaments and said fabric base consisting of glass filaments and fine uncovered electrically conductive metallic wires incorporated in spaced fillings of said fabric base of said pile fabric and spaced from the pile face of said fabric.

14. A woven pile fabric having a fabric base and piles projecting from at least one face thereof, said piles consisting of glass filaments and said fabric base consisting of glass filaments and fine uncovered electrically conductive metallic wires forming spaced fillings of said fabric base and being spaced from the pile face of said fabric.

15. A woven pile fabric comprising piles of glass filaments and a fabric base consisting of glass filament yarn woven in consecutive fillings and fine uncovered electrically conductive metallic wires incorporated spaced from each other in at least part of said fillings, thus being spaced from the pile face of said fabric.

' EZEKIEL J. JACOB.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2419848 *Apr 28, 1945Apr 29, 1947Morey Glen HElectrical heater and method of manufacturing it
US2433239 *Jun 23, 1945Dec 23, 1947Russell Mfg CoElectroconductive fabric and process of making the same
US2582341 *Jun 3, 1947Jan 15, 1952Celanese CorpElectrical device
US2586250 *Sep 12, 1949Feb 19, 1952H I Thompson CompanyHeat exchanger
US2641628 *Apr 5, 1948Jun 9, 1953Pittsburgh Des Moines CompanyPothead
US2759092 *Sep 25, 1953Aug 14, 1956Fortin Paul RobertElectrical heating unit and process of making the same
US2858410 *Jun 7, 1955Oct 28, 1958Kinghurst LtdFlexible material panel
US2859322 *Jul 19, 1956Nov 4, 1958Curtiss Wright CorpLaminated heating structure
US2932719 *Jul 14, 1955Apr 12, 1960M H Godden Cheltenham LtdElectrical resistance mats
US2938943 *Nov 26, 1954May 31, 1960Felten & Guilleaume CarlswerkElectrical cable for heavy currents
US2989234 *Jul 30, 1956Jun 20, 1961Texaco IncElectrical analogue
US3288912 *Sep 17, 1964Nov 29, 1966Hussey Ray WCarpets wired for sound
US4134192 *Oct 12, 1976Jan 16, 1979Gould Inc.Composite battery plate grid
US6160246 *Sep 13, 1999Dec 12, 2000Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Method of forming electric heat/warming fabric articles
US6215111Dec 21, 1999Apr 10, 2001Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Electric heating/warming fabric articles
US6307189Oct 31, 2000Oct 23, 2001Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Electric heating/warming fabric articles
US6373034Oct 26, 2000Apr 16, 2002Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Electric heating/warming fabric articles
US6414286Feb 23, 2001Jul 2, 2002Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Electric heating/warming fibrous articles
US6501055Mar 22, 2001Dec 31, 2002Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Electric heating/warming fabric articles
US6548789Jun 12, 2000Apr 15, 2003Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Electric resistance heating/warming fabric articles
US6720539Apr 25, 2003Apr 13, 2004Milliken & CompanyWoven thermal textile
US6852956Feb 25, 2002Feb 8, 2005Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Fabric with heated circuit printed on intermediate film
US6888112Feb 25, 2002May 3, 2005Malden Hills Industries, Inc.Electric heating/warming woven fibrous articles
US6963055Mar 17, 2003Nov 8, 2005Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Electric resistance heating/warming fabric articles
US7038177Sep 2, 2004May 2, 2006Malden Mills Industries, Inc.Electric heating/warming fabric articles
US7151062Apr 25, 2003Dec 19, 2006Milliken & CompanyGeneration heat from electricity power sources; mixtur eof electroconductive and nonconductor yarns
US20110068098 *Nov 24, 2010Mar 24, 2011Taiwan Textile Research InstituteElectric Heating Yarns, Methods for Manufacturing the Same and Application Thereof
WO2004001903A2 *Jun 20, 2003Dec 31, 2003Beacon Looms IncKnitted electrical conductor fabric
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/391, 139/425.00R, 174/124.00G, 219/545, 338/208, 174/117.00M
International ClassificationD03D27/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D27/00
European ClassificationD03D27/00