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Publication numberUS2381663 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1945
Filing dateJun 8, 1944
Priority dateJun 8, 1944
Publication numberUS 2381663 A, US 2381663A, US-A-2381663, US2381663 A, US2381663A
InventorsGreneker Lillian L
Original AssigneeGreneker Lillian L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Display head
US 2381663 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7, 1945- 4 GRENEKER 2,381,663

' DISPLAY HEAD Filed June 8, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet l A TTOANE Y3 A g. 7, 9 5- L'GRENEKER DISPLAY HEAD Filed June 8, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 P m TE 8 .mm H 2 N 4 6? 4 N My .M L L||| W 1 Patented Aug. 7, 1945 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE V V I Q i 2,381,663 v ,7 [DISPLAY HEAD Lillian L. Greneker, New York, N. Y. Application June 8, 1944,. Serial No.7 539,352

more particularly to display heads for use either separately or aspart of complete manikins, for use. in show-window and other merchandising displays. 1 1

- The general object of the invention. is to provide a display head having a hair-simulating portion constructed in a novel and advantageous manner.

More specifically, certain objects of the invention are to provide .a display head capable of supporting a hat with a natural effect in which the hair-simulating portion is made of. textile fabric capable of being arranged or draped and surface decorated to simulate in configuration and surface appearance a variety of attractive coiffures; in which the hair-simulating portion is soft and yielding and resilient whereby hats may be more readily fitted thereto with a natural effect; which eliminates the need for separate wigs; which is economical to manufacture; and which presents a unique appearance.

The foregoing objects, and others which may appear, are accomplished in the manners exemplified in the present preferred embodiments of the invention hereinafter described by way of illustration, having reference to the drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of a display device embodying the invention and depicting a womans head; v

Fig. 2 is a central vertical section through a head like that of Fig. 1 having a similar hairsimulating portion;

Fig. 3 is a vertical section through a head having a different type of .coiffure; and

Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3.

I those display heads to which the hair is attached in the form of a, wig, as distinguished from those embodying a sculptured representation of hair integral with the material ofthe rest of the head, the skull portion is ordinarily continuous with the faceand neck and is bald and the representation of hair, of whatever material it may be, is applied thereto. Unless one uses a substantial quantity of hair, be it real, artificial, or simulated as by yarn, fibers and the like, the coifiure portion of the display head has little or no resiliency. Of course where the simulation of hair is sculptured or molded, it has none. Such display heads are incapable of satisfactorily supporting a hat, because if an attempt is made to fit a hat on such a display head as ona human head, the effect is unnatural and unpleasing. Moreover, the building up of I 2 Claims. (ores-49) This invention relates to display devices, and

a ,eoiffure with a substantial body requires a considerable amount of relatively expensive material and. skilled labor'is needed for dressing the hair.

According: to this invention, the hair simulating; portion of the display head is composed of a: base of resilient material supported by the skull portion and having an outer wavy configuration resembling the configuration of a waved coifiure, towhich wavy configuration the resil ient. material returns aftercompression by a hat, and a sheet of fabric draped over and secured to. said base of resilient material and conforming to: the outer wavy configuration thereof and surface-decoratedto simulate a coiffure' The resillent material serves to give body to the representation of a waved coiffure, to provide a medium capable of being molded into any desired contours and to puff out and support the fabric. At its marginal portions the hair-simulating fabric is adhesively secured to the face and neck portions of the display head; and over the skull portion it may, if desired, be locally secured at various points as an aid to producing the desired effects. To a display head so constructed, a hat may be readily applied with a natural and pleasing effect.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 there is shown-a display head formed as a hollow shell ID of any desired material, for example papiermach. The outer surface thereof is covered with a textile fabric l l, adhesively secured over the face and neck portions. From the hairline I2 on the forehead to the hairline M at the back of the neck, and similarly on the sides of the head, the fabric 1 I is left free and a surplus is provided sufficient to cover and conform to the Wavy convolutions of a mass of resilient material 15, positioned on the skull underneath the fabric.

The resilient material l5 may be any one of a wide variety of materials or mixtures of materials such as cotton, wool, excelsior, horsehair or various synthetic fibers. It might also be a molded and contoured mass of spongy material. In this embodiment, the resilient material may be modeled into a formed mass having the desired wavy contour and the fabric applied over it. Adhesives may be used to hold it in place, as a binder to maintain the shaping of the mass and to fix the fabric on the fibrous resilient material.

As is usual, the display head is painted over the face and neck to provide the proper complexion and develop the features such as eyes, eyebrows, mouth etc., and similarly the hairsimulating portion of the fabric is appropriately painted to color, simulate, shade and accentuate any desired coiffure.

InFigs. 3 and 4 a display head generally similar to that just described is shown, one difference being that a considerable length of loose fabric is left depending from the natural hairline M, at the back of the neck, where it reverses its direction and falls downwardly so as to form a pocket l6, containing the resilient filling material l5 which also covers the crown of the head. This pocket portion enables the fabric and filling to be contoured to represent various well known styles of hair dressing. These figures also show how fastening members such as nails or pins I! may be used to shape the fabric and resilient material, or aid in so doing, and also hold it in place after it is shaped. By inserting the pins a greater or less distance the fabric may be pulled down by a greater or less extent and the resilient material more Or less compressed. For example the simulation of a part in the hair may be produced by driving the pins all the way in as shown at I8. Fig. 4 also shows how the fabric is left loose above the hairline at the sides IQ of the head, as well as at the forehead and neck.

It is not essential to the invention that the fabric which forms the hair-simulating portion should extend over the entire display head, as it may be desired to leave the face and neck portions without this reinforcing covering, in which case the hair-simulating fabric may be adhesively secured to the stiff and unyielding parts of the head around its marginal portions only, the edge of the fabric being covered up and blended with face and neck when the head is painted.

Since various changes may be made in the details of construction above described, they are to be regarded as merely illustrative and the invention is to be construed broadly within the purview of the claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A display head comprising a head shell, a hair-simulating portion composed of a base of resilient material supported by said shell and having an outer wavy configuration resembling the wavy configuration of a waved coiffure, to which wavy configuration the resilient material returns after compression, and a sheet of fabric adhesively secured to said shell and draped over and secured to said base of resilient material and conforming to the outer wavy configuration thereof and surface-decorated to simulate a coiffure.

2. A display head comprising a head shell, a hair-simulating portion composed of a base of resilient material supported by said shell and having an outer wavy configuration resembling the wavy configuration of a waved coiffure, to which wavy configuration the resilient material returns after compression, a sheet of fabric adhesively secured to said shell and draped over said base of resilient material and conforming to the outer wavy configuration thereof and surface-decorated to simulate a coiffure, and nails driven into said shell through the said fabric and resilient material at the depressions in the waved configuration of the simulated coiffure.

LILLIAN L. GRENEKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3313044 *Nov 9, 1964Apr 11, 1967Marvin Glass & AssociatesDesign kit
US7934974May 31, 2006May 3, 2011Mattel, Inc.Compact styling head
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/94
International ClassificationA47F8/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47F8/00
European ClassificationA47F8/00