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Publication numberUS2382828 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 14, 1945
Filing dateJul 31, 1940
Priority dateJul 31, 1940
Publication numberUS 2382828 A, US 2382828A, US-A-2382828, US2382828 A, US2382828A
InventorsBernard J Staneslow
Original AssigneeMoore Business Forms Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety record paper
US 2382828 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Au8 14 1945 l B. J. sTANEsLow i 2,382,828

SAFETY ECORD PAPER Filed July 51, 194C 4 morn/8.1-

Patented Aug. 14, 1945 SAFETY RECORD PAPER Bernard J. Staneslow, Niagara Falls, N. Y., assignor to Moore Business Forms, Inc., a. corporation oi.' Delaware i Application July 31, 1940, Serial No. 343,941

9 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in safety record paper including in its composition a substance that is solvent to the dyes in inks such as used in ordinary commercial carbon or transfer paper, and to such safety paper as employed in manifolding assemblies including record paper and interleaved carbon or transfer paper. The improved safety paper is solvent to the dyes in the carbon paper causing the dyes to be extracted from the carbon copy made on the paper surface, and to penetrate the fibers of the record paper, whereby the inscriptions cannot be erased, nor are they subject to eradication by chemical action.

It is a general object of the invention to provide an improved safety paper that can be advantageously employed either for receiving separate and independent inscriptions or in manifolding assemblies of record and carbon paper so that the dyes used in the inscribing material or ink or in the carbon paper ink and impressed upon the paper surface by the inscribing action are caused to penetrate into the fibers of the paper in such a manner that it cannot be easily erased or eradicated.

A further object is to provide an improved safety paper that can be used in manifolding assemblies including carbon or transfer paper, and is translucent so that inscriptions made on one side thereof can be read at the other side and at the same time the paper is capable"ofreceiving inscribed or printed data and the inscription is not subject to erasure.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved safety paper solvent to dyes in the carbon paper ink, and that is resistant to the spreading of the dye penetrating the paper fibers and of good color contrast with the paper, thus assuring clear, well defined writing characters that can be easily read.

Still another object is to provide an improved translucent safety paper of the nature mentioned i that is not greasy or tacky, and that will satis- A further object of the invention is to provide a safety paper, solvent to the dyes' used in commercial carbon papers but resistant to bleeding" or penetration independently of inscription of the dyes of the carbon paper as employed in manifolding assemblies in which the carbon paper is interleaved with the record paper and kept in this assembled relation for considerable periods of time prior to or after the making of the inscriptions.

A further object is to providean improved method of incorporating in the paper the materials for rendering it ltranslucent and solvent to the dyes of the carbon paper ink.

A further object is to provide an improved composition that can be easily applied to ordinary record paper, such as that including wood or vegetable fibers, for rendering the paper translucent and also-solvent to .the dyes.

Further objects of the invention will be in part pointed out in the following detailed description of certain illustrative but preferred embodiments of the invention, and will be in part obvious as the disclosure proceeds.

The invention accordingly comprises an article of manufacture having the features, properties and relation of elements, and alsocomprises the several steps and the relation of one or more of such steps to each of the others, which will be exemplified in the article and method hereinafter disclosed, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the claims.

For a more comprehensive disclosure of the nature, objects and advantages of the invention refdit erence is had to the following detailed description and to the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a partially diagrammatic view of a record assembly embodying the invention; and

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a record sheet capable of use in a record assembly and embodying the improvements.

Although the improved record paper is capaf ble of being used singly or in various forms of manifolding assemblies of the nature shown in Fig. 1 of the drawing, it can, for example, be used also -ln connection with record assemblies of the long continuous'traveler type embodying a plurality of interleaved long continuous record and transfer strips and it can be used in the form of ioose sheets adapted to be interleaved with other loose record sheets and loose carbon sheets .for inscription in typewriting machines 'or the like or for manual inscription.

.in the record assembly shown in the drawing there is a topor original record sheet B, a duplicate record sheet 3, a triplicate record sheet 1 and a double faced carbon or transiertsheet sheetcapable of receiving having transfer material on both its upper and lower surfaces. The duplicate record sheet C embodies the improvements of this invention and is treated as herein described to render it solvent to the dyes used in coating the transfer surfaces of the transfer sheet 8. The triplicate record sheet l can also be similarly treated if desired. In the assembly shown the safety record sheet i is positioned in overlying relation with reference tothe transfer sheet I so that the inscriptions made by the transfer sheet are positioned on the under surface of the sheet l. For this reason the record sheet t is transparent so that the inscriptions made upon its undersurface may be read at the upper surface thereof. In cases where the inscriptions are made on the upper surface of the safety record sheet 8 it is unimportant that this record sheet be translucent. 'I'he record sheet 6, shown in Fig. 2, can be used in a record assembly such as mentioned, or it can be separately interleaved with record and carbon sheets for manifold inscription, or used singly for recording inscriptionshaving dyes in the inscribing material or ink.

The record and transfer sheets shown in Fig. 1 may be bound together in the assembly by means of attaching devices. such as the stitching or staples i, so that Ithe sheets lie close together in face-to-face contact, but for convenience they are shown diagrammatically as being separated slightly so asto reveal the structure and arrangement more clearly. Also. blank forms may be applied or printed on the record surfaces of the record sheets, including .the safety record sheet i.

As mentioned, the safety record sheet I is treated in accordance with this invention. to render it solvent tothe dyes used, in the transfer coatings of .the transfer sheet l. In cases where the inscription is to be received on the under surface of the safety record sheet C, this sheet is also treated in accordance with this invention to render it translucent so that the inscriptions can be read from the upper surface. The treatment to make the sheet i translucent has been selected in accordance with this invention to make the and holding in a satisfactory manner the transfer inscriptions, and also to make it similarly capable of receiving and holding printed impressions, such ,as the blank forms and headings that are applied by ordinary printing operations, such-as letter press.

Commercial carbon paper inks, such as used for making the transfer surfaces of' carbon papers, usually contain dyes or coloring matter, and the safety record sheet I has been treated in accordance with this invention to render it solvent to the dyes ordinarily-used. such, for example, as

methyl violet dye, crystal violet dye, victoria blue base. negrosine black base, and .the like.

For the purpose of rendering the safety record sheet solvent to the dyes oi' the carbon paper ink, it is found effective to treat it with a substance such' as an organic ester, obtained by the action of acids on alcohols. y As an example of such an ester diglycol laurate is mentioned as being especially eilective, and also glyceryl monoricinoleate has been found to be satisfactory. This material is conveniently applied by forming a solution in a volatile liquid, such, for example, as methyl algohol, the esters being easily dissolved in the alcohol as later described. In cases where it is desirable to make the safety paper translucent as, for example. where it is used in the manner disclosedinl'imlof the drawing, an oilisusedthat practice to be effective in the treatment of the safety paper for the accomplishment of the results mentioned may be given as follows:

l Gallons Pale castor oil of a viscosity of about 148 poises at 25 C Pale castor oil of,l a viscosity of about 32 poises at 25 C Diglycol laurate neutral 5 Methyl alcohol-; 35

The different ingredients mentioned are stirred together to give a homogeneous solution, the different materials being easily soluble in the methyl alcohol.

Instead of diglycol laurate, glyceryl monoricinoleate can be substituted to give about the same results. Also, in order to neutralize the odor of the castor oil, an aromatic substance may be added to' the solution. For this purpose the equivalent of an extract obtained from the tonka bean may be used. 'I'his extract can be dissolved ina light pale oil such as castor oil and then added tofthe composition or solution above mentioned. To prepare the aromatic extract for use in the above formula about one pound is dissolved in 2200 cubic centimeters of light pale oil, using heat. About 400 cubic centimeters of this solution added to the above formula gives a satisfactory result. I

In cases where translucency of the paper isnot 4Q required, the castor oil may be omitted from the above typical formula or varied considerably. But it is noted that the oil mentioned when incorporated in the paper ha.r some slight solvent eii'ect upon the dyes in the carbon paper ink, although much less in degree than that of the esters mentioned. Also the oil aids in giving body to the residual material in the paper to avoid objectionable spreading-of the dye colors, thus promoting the permanent legibility oi' the inscriptions. v

The composition above described is of such a nature that it can be easily applied to the paper to render the latter solvent to the dyes and also -to provide a good degree of translucency. At the same time, the oil and other materials are of such a nature that the treated paper is capable of receiving and holding in a commercially satis- .factory manner the inscriptions as well as the printed matter. The paper may be the ordinary commercial grades of record paper made of wood or vegetable ber or cellulose.

Various methods may be employed for applying the solution to the paper such, for example, as spraying the solution upon the surface of the paper or immersing the paper in the solution so that the paper is treated throughout the inscrip- .tion-receiving area thereof. An effective method is to run strips of the paper over or in contact with wicks oi felt or textile fabric that dip into the solution contained in a receptacle. 'Ihe typical formula given above is suitable for application by the wick method. 'Ihe solution or composition when thus applied is absorbed into the ,body of the paper and the volatile liquid, such as the methyl alcohol may then bel evaporated as,

for example, by subjecting. the treated paper to heat. This may be done by passing the paper .through a heated oven.

When the alcohol has been removed by evaporation, as described, the oils and ester remain in the paper being non-volatile and non-drying. The treated palper is not tacky nor greasy, is nondrying and is stable to aging, these qualities being promoted both by the oils and 'by the-solvent materials. Also, it is resistant to solvent action sometimes referred to as bleeding," that is the action on .the dyes in the carbon paper independently of inscription when the paper is made up in the form of permanent manifolding assemlblies 4such as shownv in Fig. 1, and kept in this assembled relation for considerable periods of time prior to or after the making of the inscriptions.

When transfer inscriptions are made upon the surface of the safety paper; .the dye solvent acts upon the transfer inscription extracting the dye gradually from the transferred material or ink and causing it to penetrate into the treated paper. The amount and depth of the penetration of the dye into the paper :gradually increases with time.

This produces a stronger colored copy than that of an original carbon copy. Also, the copy cannot be removed from the paper by erasure Without destroying the writing surface and it cannot be destroyed by chemicals. The extracted dye does not spread in the treated paper so that the original impressions of the type characters are maintained well defined, providing permanent clear legible inscriptions.

Since certain changes may be made in the above improvements and different embodiments of theinvention could b'e made Without departing from the scope thereof, it is inten-ded that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting'sense.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: 1. A method of treating paper tomake safety record paper, including, applying to the paper substantially throughout its inscription receiving area a solution in a volatile liquid of oil together with a substance solvent to dyes in inscribing material and causing the solurtion to be absorbed into the body of the paper, said solvent substance being selected from the groupconsisting of diglycol laurate and glyceryl monoricinoleate, and then evaporating the volatile liquid by application of heat.

2. A safety record paper treated substantially throughout its inscription receiving area with oil and a substance solvent to dyes in ink used for treated area to penetrate into the fibers of the paper, rendering such later inscriptions substantially permanent and resistant to erasure or eradication, said solvent substance being selected from the group consisting of diglycol laurate and glyceryl monoricinoleate. l

3. A safety record paper treated substantially throughout its inscription receiving area with inscribing the safety record paper, so as to cause f the dyes applied later lby inscriptions on said' dglycol laurate, thus rendering the paper solvent to dyes in the inscribing material used for inscribing the same and causing .the dyes applied later toy inscriptions on said treated area to penetrate into the fibers of the palper, rendering such later inscriptions substantially permanent and resistant to erasure or eradication.

4. A safety record paper treated substantially throughout its inscription receiving area with l pale castor oil and diglycol laurate, thus rendering the paper translucent and solvent to dyes in the inscribing material used for inscribing the same and causing r,the dyes applied later by in'- to dyes in the inscribing material used for inscribing the same and causing the dyes applied later lby inscriptions on said treated area to penetrate into the fibers of the paper, rendering such later inscriptions substantially permanent and resistant to erasure or eradication.

6. A method of treating paper to make safety record paper, including, applying to the paper substantially throughout its inscriptionI receiving area. a solution in a volatile liquid of oil together with a substance solvent to dyes in inscribing material, said solvent substance being selected from the group consisting of diglycol laurate and glyceryl monoricinoleate, and then evaporating the volatile liquid.

'1. A composition for treating paper to make safety record paper, including, a solution in more than three parts by volume of methyl alcohol, of approximately one part by volume of castor oil of relatively high viscosity in the Vicinity of about 148 poises at 25 C., one part by volume of castor oil of relatively 16W viscosity in the vicinity yof about 32 poises at 25 C., and one part of an organic ester solvent to dyes in inscribing materials, said ester being selected from the group consisting of diglycol laurate and glyceryl monorinicoleate. d

8. A manifolding assembly including record and transfer material in superposed transfer relation, said transfer material including a dye, certain of the record material .that is in transfer relation with the transfer material being safety paper resistant to erasure of inscriptions thereon made by said transfer material and including a substance solvent to the dye in the transfer material causing the dye to penetrate the safety paper to promote erasure resistance, said safety on made by said transfer material and includingVv diglycol laurate to act as a solvent to the dye in the transfer material causing the dye to penetrate the safety paper to promote erasure resistance, said safety paper being resistant to bleeding of the dye independently of inscription.

BERNARD J STANESLOW.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3833395 *Sep 11, 1972Sep 3, 1974Burroughs CorpContinuous form computer print-out document protection system
US3837888 *Apr 25, 1972Sep 24, 1974Kores Holding Zug AgDuplicating material
US4149738 *Oct 5, 1977Apr 17, 1979Milton WilkowTamper-proof page assembly
US4397483 *Oct 15, 1981Aug 9, 1983Mitsubishi Paper Mills, Ltd.Pressure sensitive recording paper
Classifications
U.S. Classification503/227, 283/72, 428/199, 428/211.1, 106/244, 428/914, 427/144
International ClassificationD21H21/46
Cooperative ClassificationY10S428/914, D21H21/46
European ClassificationD21H21/46