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Publication numberUS2384667 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1945
Filing dateApr 14, 1944
Priority dateApr 14, 1944
Publication numberUS 2384667 A, US 2384667A, US-A-2384667, US2384667 A, US2384667A
InventorsCharles G Dowd
Original AssigneeCharles G Dowd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper currency
US 2384667 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 11, 1945. I c. G. DOWD 2,384,567.

PAPER CURRENCY Filed ADril 14, 1944 IN VEN TOR.

azj mrr ATTORNEYS Patented Sept. 11, 1945 '13,

' OFFICE 2,384,667 PAPER CURRENCY Charles G. Dowd, Fetters Hot Springs, Oalif Application April 14, 1944; Serial No. 531,048

' Claims. (01. ass-8) l This invention relates to currency and it is oneobject of the invention to provide a new type of Currency which resembles paper money but combines therewith gold orother metal of the value shown upon the paper certificate. Another object of the invention is to provide a paper certificate having metal so combined therewith that the metal willbe disposed between thin sheets of paper or laminations which are adheringly secured in face to face engagement with each other and serve to protect the thin strands ofgold from being worn away or accidentally detached from the paper.

Another object of the invention is to so arrange the gold strands that ends of one strand will terminate at side edges of the certificate as terminals and thus permit electric current to be passed through the strands to test the strands for quantity and quality of metal and thus determine whether the certificate is genuine government issue or a counterfeit.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing wherein the figure shows a paper certificate with one layer or paper lamination partially removed to show the arrangement of gold strands.

This improved currency may be referred to as a gold certificate as it consists of layers or laminations l and 2 formed of paper, one sheet of paper being printed in the usual manner for a face and the other printed for a back. The sheets of paper are thinner than those now used for printing paper money but their combined thickness will correspond to such thickness so that the feel of the paper will be the same as paper money now in use.

Before the paper sheets or laminations l and 2 are glued in face to face engagement with each other an arrangement 3 of strands of gold wire are disposed between the paper sheets and when the sheets of paper are glued to each other the strands of gold Wire will be protected from wear and also protected against accidental displacement. It is also desirable that one of the sheets of paper, preferably sheet 2, have applied to its inner surface numbers 4 in gold leaf indicating the value of the currency as well as several numbers and other figures which will serve for identification. Therefore the currency bears a hidden indication of its value in gold leaf numbers as well as having this value printed upon outer surfaces of the paper sheets as shown at 5 and in as many other places upon outer surfaces of the sheets as desired.

; UNITED STATES PATENT sists of a plurality of rings 6 disposed in concentric relation to each other and straight strands I and 8 which are disposed in spaced parallel relation to each other in crossed relation to the rings 6. Portions'of' the strands l and 8 which cross the rings are soldered thereto as shown at 9 to .hold them together in conductive engagement with each other and ends of the strands l terminateat the outer ring 6 whereas the strand 8 projects from the outer ring and is of such length that its ends terminate and are soldered to a steel'ring'or barterminals ID at side edges of the paper sheets. At the extremities of the strand 8 the steel terminals ID are exposed at the edges of the paper sheets so that when testing the certificate it may be placed in a machine having magnetic terminals for engaging the steel terminals IO and current caused to flow through the wire strands and energize the volt meter if the wires are of the proper quantity and gold quality. As an example it will be assumed that in a one dollar certificate the group 3 of strands and rings will contain ten grains of gold capable of conducting one volt while in a two dollar certificate the group 3 will contain twenty grains of gold and be capable of conducting two volts. For other certificates the proper quantity of gold threads or strands will be used and it will be readily understood that when a certificate is placed in a testing machine set to test certificates of a predetermined denomination, current of the predetenmined voltage may pass through if a certificate contains the proper quantity of gold whereas if a larger or smaller quantity is used, the registering device of the testing machine will detect such variation in quantity (detection being accomplished through employment of the unique combination of properties of gold; namely, the degree of conductivity, the specific gravity and the extent to which gold is repelled by magnetic force).

It is proposed to have the testing machine equipped with lamps emitting light which will pass through the paper but not pass through the gold strands and the gold leaf used for the forming of figures 4 and all other figures or letters used for identification and the hidden values and the design of the group 3 of wire strands will be disclosed. It will thus be seen that the certificate will bear a quantity of gold having a predetermined value and also hidden value-identifying means. Since the strands are very thin, and preferably no thicker than fine fibres or hairs, they will not prevent the certificate from The arrangement of strands of gold wire con 56 being folded or crumpled when in use and the certificate may be handled in the usual manner when counted or folded for insertion into a pocket book or purse.

Then there is always the acid test, if in doubt, when gold is used in this kind of currency.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is:

1. Currency comprising sheets of thin paper adheringly secured in face to face engagement with each other and a plurality of metal rings disposed in concent'ric relation to each other and of predetermined monetary value disposed be: tween said paper sheets.

2. Currency comprising sheets of thin paper adheringly secured in face to face engagement with each other, and an arrangement of concentric metal strands of predetermined monetary value disposed between said paper sheets with portions thereof secured to steel ring exposed at marginal edges of the paper sheets.

3. Currency comprising sheets of thin paper adheringly secured in face to face engagement with each other, and an arrangement of metal strands disposed between said paper sheets and consisting of endless strands in concentric relation to each other and other strands crossing the endless strands and secured in conductive engagement therewith, one of the last mentioned strands having portions projecting from the endless strands andterminating in a steel ring at marginal edges of the paper sheets.

4. Currency comprising'sheets of thin paper adheringly secured in face to face engagement with each other, an arrangement of concentric gold strands and a plurality of straight gold strands disposed in spaced parallel relation to each other and in crossed relation to the concentric gold strands, the straight gold strands being connected to the concentric gold strands at their points of contact, disposed between said paper sheets said concentric gold strands and said straight gold strands being of predetermined monetary value, the outer face of one sheet being marked to designate the value of the certificate, and the inner face of one sheet bearing a value indicating mark of metal impervious to light.

5. Currency comprising sheets of thin paper adheringly secured in face to face engagement with each other, and an arrangement of concentric gold strands and a plurality of straight gold strands disposed in spaced parallel relation to each other and in crossed relation to the concentric gold strands, the straight gold strands being connected'to the concentric gold strands at their points of contact disposed between said paper sheets said arrangement of concentric and straight gold strands having a predetermined monetary value and capable of passing electric current of predetermined voltage, portions of the strands being secured to steel rings exposed at marginal edges of the paper sheets.

CHARLES G. DOWD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4536013 *Mar 11, 1983Aug 20, 1985Gao Gesellschaft Fur Automation Und OrganisationMultilayered indentification card
US5161829 *Mar 9, 1992Nov 10, 1992James River Corporation Of VirginiaSecurity paper and method of manufacturing the same
US5471039 *Jun 22, 1994Nov 28, 1995Panda Eng. Inc.Electronic validation machine for documents
US5475205 *Jun 22, 1994Dec 12, 1995Scientific Games Inc.Document verification system
US5599046 *Jun 22, 1994Feb 4, 1997Scientific Games Inc.Lottery ticket structure with circuit elements
EP0085408A1 *Jan 27, 1983Aug 10, 1983Air Products And Chemicals, Inc.A process for the preparation of methylamines in the presence of a highly active catalyst for methanol amination
EP0373500A2 *Dec 7, 1989Jun 20, 1990Vittorio GiuseppeAnti-forgery system for paper money or other documents
WO1995035216A1 *Jun 21, 1995Dec 28, 1995Scient Games IncLottery ticket structure with circuit elements
WO2010110883A1 *Mar 23, 2010Sep 30, 2010Laurie JohansenPrecious metal thin-film laminate (pmtl)
Classifications
U.S. Classification283/83, 283/901, 283/85
International ClassificationB42D15/00, G07D7/00, G07D7/12
Cooperative ClassificationB42D15/0013, G07D7/004, G07D7/124, Y10S283/901
European ClassificationG07D7/00D, G07D7/12P, B42D15/00C