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Publication numberUS2384810 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 18, 1945
Filing dateMay 13, 1940
Priority dateMay 13, 1940
Publication numberUS 2384810 A, US 2384810A, US-A-2384810, US2384810 A, US2384810A
InventorsCalleson Amos, Edgar A Calleson
Original AssigneeCrown Cork & Seal Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 2384810 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 18, 1945. A. AczALlJsoN ET AL CONTAINER Filed May 15, 1940 4 sheetsheet 1V 0572208 Calleson Calleson www Q4 w'- mw Sept- 18,1945. y A, CALLESON ETAL' 2,384,810 lCONTAINER y Filed May 15, 1940 `4 sheets-'sheet 2 -.2322306 Ca Z esp l 10 I d nacazzes/m,

A. CALLESON ET AL Sept. 18, 1945.

CONTAINER Filed May 15, 1940 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 W ,m W E ma@ s mi www Patented Sept. 18, 1945 UNITED STATES PATENTCOFFICE CONTAINER Amos Calleson and Edgar A. Calleson, Merrick, N. Y., assignors to Crown Cork & Seal Company, Inc., Baltimore, Md., a corporation of New York Application May 13, 1940, Serial No. 334,876

(C1. zzo- 1) 35 Claims.

This invention relates to containers and is particularly directed to improvements in metal receptacles of the can type.

It is an important object of the invention to provide a metal container which is devoid of the usual conventional side and top seams generally associated with -metal cans, whereby the container is strong, presents a nice appearance, and is capable of simple and cheap production.

Another object of the invention is to provide a container having but two parts. In the case of the preferred construction the can includes (1) a body portion having an integral top in which is located an integral filling and pouring mouth and closure receiving means, the entire axial and circumferential dimensions being drawn from a single cup-shaped blank, and (2) a bottom which may be suitably secured to the body as by welding or seaming. In a modified form of the invention, the container has (1) an integral bottom and body likewise drawn from a single cup-shaped blank and (2) a top similarly drawn from a cupshaped blank and united as lby welding or soldering to the body to form a substantially integral structure, the t-op also having an integral pour ing mouth or spout and closure receiving finish.

A further object of the invention is to provide a drawn container having a cap-receiving finish which permits the container to be sealed by means of a crown" or crimped cap, and characterized by a relatively flat sealing surface extended outwardly to fonm an overhanging shoulder of greater diameter than the portion of the container immediately therebeneath, whereby the cap may be tightly locked thereon, the locking shoulder being preferably in the form of a curled bead rigidly supported by the container wall.

Also, it is an object of the invention to provide a metal container of this character drawn in such a manner that the end used to form the cap-receiving iinish is the least-drawn and most ductile end, and, therefore, the more suitable end for that metal working operation, because it has characteristics such as gauge, hardness and ductility more nearly approaching those of the metal in the original sheet from which it is drawn than the metal at the other end of the container.

Another object is to provide such a container in which the side wall, top and cap-receiving finish are drawn from a. single blank, and in which the metal at the mouth and cap-receiving finish are relatively undrawn or worked as compared to the metal at the other end of the container, thus providing metal for forming the lip-finish and in the iinished lip which is more ductile and more i are placed directly upon ice or set upon a shelf,

plished after the' body is formed, and the decorav readily workable than the metal at the other end of the container.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a container of this type in which the metal ofv the container wall increases in gauge from the mouth to the bottom of the container, the metal at the mouth being unincreased in gauge as compared to the metal of the original stock, whereas the metal of the wall from the top to the bottom of the container is substantially increased in gauge from that of the original stock.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a container drawn from a single cup-shaped blank having a cylindrical body terminating in an integral frustro-conical top provided at its apex with an integral cap receiving finish in the form of an external bead of larger diameter than the portion of the container wall immediately therebelow, whereby to provide a locking shoulder, and preferably overlying and supported upon an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall which forms the container mouth and closes the bead.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a pouring opening or mouth for the container which is defined by an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall merging into the body portion without interruption whereby the contents may readily iiow without danger of collecting or foaming in the container or around the mouth thereof, the wall being extended to form an overlying closed bead by which it is substantially concealed.

It is another object of the invention to provide a container in which the entire interior wall is smooth and unobstructed. Hence, the bottle may be provided with a continuous protective lining and may also be thoroughly washed and drained without permitting collection of the washing fluid within the container or about the pouring opening thereof. In like manner, the exterior of the container is smooth and easy to maintain clean. This is important, in .that where the containers the container may be readily wiped with a cloth to remove dust and/or moisture and produce a. nice appearing package.

A further` object of the invention is to provide a 'container which may beibetter decorated than the usual "tin cans. That is to say, with the present container, the decorating may be accomtion may cover the entire body and top Portion of the container. This 1sv a decided improvement, in that in the decoration of conventional metal cans it is necessary to apply the decoration to the metal before it is formed to shape and in such seamed containers, it is required that areas adjacent the seams be left vacant because the soldering heat injures any decorative coating along the seam lines.

The container is useful for dry, liquid or plastic contents, such as foods. medicines, oils. etc.. and iinds particular utility in the case of pressure or carbonated beverages, e. g., beer. Because of the strength of the container, the contents may be heated therein, for example at sterilizing or pasteurizing temperatures without danger of causing leakage or distorting the shape of the container.

Before explaining in detail the present invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and arrangement of parts illustrated in the accompanying drawings. since the invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that thephraseology or terminology employed herein is for the .purpose of description and not of limitation, and it is not intended to limit the invention claimed herein beyond the requirements of the prior art.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a sectional view of a preferred form of metal container.

Figure 2 is a similar view of a modied form of container.

Figure 3 is a detail sectional view of the top and a preferred form of cap receiving portion of the container of Figures 1 and 2.

Figure '4 is a detail view of a modified construction associated with the container of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is an enlarged detail view of the top and cap receiving portion having a crown cap applied thereto, for the containers shown in Figures 1 and 2.

Figure 6 is a sectional view partly broken away showing one form of seam constructionfor securing the bottom of the container shown in Figure 1 to the body.

Figure 7 is a sectional view of the top partly broken away and showing a modified form of mouth and closure receiving finish.

Figure 8 is a sectional view of the body partly broken away and particularly showing av preferred form of the bottom and the manner in which the same is secured to the body.

Figures 9 to 22 illustrate the manner in which the container is formed from a blank of metal, Figures 20, 21 and 22 showing in detail the formation of the lmouth and crown receiving bead shown in connection with Figures 1 to 5. l

Figure 23 is a view illustrating the formation of the hemmed edge of the cap receiving bead during the curling of the bead.

Figure 24 is a fragmentary vertical sectional 'view showing a modified form of top, or top portion, and

Figure 25 is a view diagrammaticaliy showing the varying gauge orthickness of the metal forming the container wall, as hereinafter described.

Referring to Figure 1, the preferred form of the container of the present invention has a body I0 which is devoid of seams and is preferably cylindrical or of uniform diameter, but may be of any desired cross-sectional shape such as square, oval, etc., and has an integral frustro-conical top I I. The top has an upper portion forming a vertically extending cylindrical neck i 2 integral with the conical top Il and terminating. in an integral cap receiving portion or finish denoted as a whole -at I3. The body, top, neck and cap-receiving portions are drawn from a single blank of metal as shown in Figures 9 to 22 so that this part of .the container is completely devoid of seams.

Referring to Figures 3, 5 and 20 to 22. the capreceiving portion is in the form of a hollow sealing bead I4 which is circumferentially seamless or devoid of Joints or seams of any character. The interior wall I5 of the bead is inclined inwardly and upwardly from the neck I2 forming a smooth, continuous, conical inwardly tapering pouring opening or mouth for the contents, This bead is formed as shown in Figures 20 to 23 by curling the free edge I B of the metal beyond the end of the inclined wall lli outwardly. downwardly, upwardly and inwardly about the neck into a circumferentially continuous and circular hollow sealing lip or bead disposed adjacent to and overlying the entire surface of the inclined wall I5, as shown.

-The sealing bead, as shown most clearly in Figures 3 and 5, preferably overlies so as to conceal substantially completely, the inwardly and upwardly inclined wall I5 with the outer surface of which it is preferably substantially in contact so as tov be supported when under pressure. In I manner, there is provided a support for the bead to resist crowning pressures at the under-wall portion nearest the greatest diameter of the bead and substantially directly from the straight wall I 2 of the neck. Thus, there is a minimum amount of radially projecting unsupported portion of the bead. Not only is the appearance of the container improved by the concealment of the inclined wall i5, but the bead is rigidifled and the contact of its inner edge portion with the wall I5 closes the bead and prevents ingress of foreign matter which would otherwise tend to collect within the bead. Since the bead is of larger diameter than the portion of the container, i. e., the neck, immediately therebelow, it provides a freely engageable locking shoulder for a crown cap having the desired maximum rigidity, because of the formation above described,

.The free edge it oi the sealing bead may be plain, as shown in Figures 3 and 4, but it is preferably folded or hemmed as shown at Il in Figures 1 and 5. This free or folded edge preferably is substantially in contact with, so that in use it may rest upon and be supported by, the outer surface of the inclined wall l5 adjacent its juncture with the neck I2. This support is obtained by turning the inner edge portion of the bead, so that, as shown in Figures 3 and 5, one bead surface near the inner :bead edge substantially parallels and overlies the inclined wall I5 in contact. or substantially so, therewith. The hemmed edge oi Figure 5 not only avoids splitting of the metal during forming of the bead, but also aids in pre- -venting distortion when a crown cap is applied or pried off of the bead, since the reinforce of the hem resists distortion of the bead under pressure and also assists in fthe formation of a bead of the desired contour.

The hemmed edge precludes the formation oi cracks or splits in the edge during formation of the bead or during use of the container. If, incident to this forming operation, there takes place slight or incipient cracking of the free edge of the bead which is not readily observable, because 2,884,810 the free edge is turned under, the hemmed crfolded formation prevents such splits from enlarging and breaking the body of the bead, as

when the bead is strained during application of a crown cap. Moreover, the hemmed edge malntains the shape of the bead under the high crownish including a continuous, circular crown-locking shoulder` I9. Since the bead is of greater overall diameter and circumference than the portion of the neck immediately therebelow, the inwardly bent locking shoulders I9 of the crown cap 20, as shown in Figure 5, may be firmly locked or crimped beneath the continuous shoulder I8 to form a highly satisfactory seal. The crown cap 29 has a cushion liner 2| engaging the top 22 of the bead I4 and flowing downwardly therefrom about the bead. In some cases, a center spot is ailixed to the cushion liner 2|, as well known.

It is to be noted that the bead vis-flrmly supported on the top oi' the container-by having its free.` or hemmed edge overlying or resting upon the lower end of the inclined wall I5 and that capping strains are transferred directly from the v Ibead to the neck I2 and thence to the container body.

The bead Il is not uniformly curved, as Iwill be noted, but it extends outwardly from the mouth with a relatively fiat top surface -indicated at |22 in Figure 3 and at 22' in Figures lli and 22, and then curves continuously downwardly, inwardly and upwardly, so that its inner edge portion rests upon the outer surface of the inclined wall I5 approximately at its lower edge where it joins the neck I2. 'I'he inclined wall I5 and the top surface ofA the bead thus form abead of such crosssection that its area increases in dimension along axial lines of the container outwardly from the mouth and the upper and innerportion of the bead at the mouth is substantially V-shaped in cross-section. Such a formation affords a bead which is very rigid to resist deformation in use and particularly under crowning pressure. Moreover, this formation provides a relatively wide substantially flat top-sealing surface, indicated at 22' in Figures 5 and 22. This flat surface assists in obtaining a suitable seal, particularly with closures of the center spot type in which the sealing surface must lbe engaged entirely around the mouth, partly by the center spot and partly by the cushion liner of the cap.

'In drawing the container to its final body diameter and length (Figure 17) where it is ready for the neck and cap-finish formation, we maintain the metal of the neck I2 and top 36 substantially unworked and undrawn, as compared to the metal at the other end, and, therefore, suitable for the severe lip-forming operation. It is also non-increased in gauge or thickness as cornpared to the metal oi the body at the bottom end, thus providing for the lneck and cap finish formation a metal which is substantially more workable than the thickened metal at the open 4bottom-end of the container. This is desirable, since the final neck and lip finishing operations are relatively severe. Moreover, the metal of the entire body and top (Fig. 1'7) increases in gauge in the direction of the open bottom-end, thus providing a relatively strong rigid body while ,maintaining the metal at the neel: and up por.

pressure beverages.

tion of the gauge moresuitable for the dnishing operations. 'I'he metal in the toprll'and at the upper end of the neck I2 (Fig. 17) has also the lowest Rockwell hardness of any of the 'metal in the container and hence, of ductility, it is the most suitable to withstand the working incident to the curl or bead-forming operation. Hence, it is not necessary to stop the operation in order to anneal and reduce the brittleness of the metal to be used in the cap-receiving finish which isadapted. to withstand very high crowning pressures incident to the use of automatic crowning apparatus. Such apparatus may be employed without danger of distorting the sealing bead or the container to obtain a firm,

tight seal between the cap and the sealing bead.

The body I9 at its lower end, as shown in Fig ure 1, is provided with an inwardly directed continuous projection 2l' which', in one form of lthe invention, forms a seat against which the bottom 23 rests. I'he bottom is provided with a sealing flange 2l and the body is provided with 'a sealing flange 21B, which flanges are folded together and rolled or folded inwardly as shown at 29 in such a manner that a strong joint isfprovided which is wholly within the vertical confines of thecontainer. This joint, moreover, forms a support for the-container when it, stands in upright position. The customary sealing mediums may be used, if desired, at the seam between the bottom and body.

l As will be appreciated, the container is not only useful for contents which are abnormally heavy, but will also be equally satisfactory with so-called in that it -will resist expan-- sion strains without leakage or bulging -or distortion of the container.

The container may be of various sizes and in one -practical embodiment has an overall height of about 415/16" to 5" andthe body diameter is about 2%". The distance from the Ibottom edge of .the container to the projection 24 is about 1%" and from the projection to the base of the conical top about 3%," and from the base of the top tothe finish about 1*/2". The height ofthe cone is aboutll/z" to 1%" and the angularity oi' the apex angle is substantially 80.

In Figure 8, there is shown a container having a bottom Iwhich is inwardly concave and united by another form of seam in which the seaming flanges are folded outwardly so that the seam ex-k tends beyond the confines of the vertical cylinthen downwardly as shown at 28, forming a very satisfactory and strong construction, and at the same time enabling the container tostand upright without difilculty.

The conical top II' of the container shown in Figure 2 is formed as a separate part, but includes the integral neck I2 and locking lip I3', thewhole being drawn from a single blank of metal.v The open end of the body is provided ywith an integral conical rim 29 and the top and body are assembled =by applying the conical top II' over the rim 29, as shown in Figures 2 and 4 to form a frictional metal to metal contact joint along a single peripheral line which may be electrically welded or soldered to give a substantially integral structure. In some cases, the

from the standpoint 4 'to denne a shoulder as at 3l, and then inwardly as at 32 to form a hollow bead 33 or sealing lip disposed adiacent to and above the wall I5. As will be noted, the bead is of greater diameter than the wall l5 which is immediately therebelow. This bead forms a finish or cap-receiving means for a crown or crimped cap and the shoulder 3l has a curvature, as in the forms of Figures 1 and 2, adaptedto provide suillcient rigidity to resist the thrust applied during application of a crown cap. The upper surface of the bead is flattened as at 34 to assure sealing engagement with the cushion liner 2| of the cap and the free edge may be turned inwardly into a hem 35 or outwardly into a similar hem.

. If it is not desired to use a sealing composition in connection with the seams for securing the bottom of the container to the body, We sometimes so compress the overlapped and interfolded portions of the seaming flanges, as shown in Figures 1 and 6, as to produce in eiect a compacted and densifled metal joint. This joint is strong and thoroughly leakproof by reason of the densied overlapped metal layers and does not require the use of plastic sealing means.

It is to be understood that the container body and top shown in Figures 1 and '7 or the container body and bottom, and top shown in Figure 2, are each drawn from a suitable metal blank whereby the structure is not only free of seams, but has the required strength.

The container is formed of cold-rolled steel although hot-rolled steel may be employed. The gauge of the metal may vary, but it is quite thin and susceptible of the -deep drawing operations employed for manufacturing the various forms of the invention.

Referring to Figures 9 to 22, the body' l0, top Il and neck i2 are drawn from a cup-shaped blank. That is to say,r the entire axial and circumferential dimensions are drawn from a single blank. The drawing is continuous yin immediately succeeding'steps to increase the depth and decrease the diameter of the blank, as shown in Figures 9 to 13, inclusive, to provide a relatively deep cup (Figure 13), the body of which is cylintained relatively undrawn and close to the initial gauge which may be selected as the most suitable for forming the container. The metal which has been least increased in gauge and least reduced in ductility (Fig. 17) is used to form the cap-locking bead. It is, therefore, possible to proceed with the formation of that bead without discontinuing theoperations to anneal the metal to be included in the bead before forming the bead. The metal adjacent the open end of the container (Fig. 17) is more brittle and heavier in gauge than the original sheet from which the body is drawn and than the less worked metal in the neck portionl2 and top I l. While the heavier metal of the body, because of its relative lack of ductility and brittleness would be comparatively unsuitable to receive a cap finish, particularly at the lower open end, nevertheless it has the strength to provide the required body-rigidity. While the metal at the wider open end indicated at Illa in Fig. 1'7 is the most increased in gauge and least du'ctile, it has suicient ductility to permit, without previous annealing, formation of the bottom flange (Fig. 19) and of end seams (Figs. l, 6 and 8).

This increasing of the gauge of the metal, which is accomplished during the drawing operation, has the further advantage of permitting the use of initial sheet stock of thinner gauge than would otherwise be suitable, at least for the body. In other words, while the initial stock may be of sufficient thickness for the lip, top and neck formation, but not of sulcient rigidity for the body, the latter may be given during the drawing operation, by increasing the metal gauge, the desiredrigidity and strength suitable not only to prevent bending of the body, but also for receiving the seamed bottom. Moreover, a structure in which the gauge of the metal progressively increases from the lip to the bottom may be made more economically and at higher speed and more uniformly than drawn structures in which the drical and curves at l I into a closed end 36. This body is characterized by a gauge which increases from the curved portion! la continuously to the open-end from a point Just below the curved portion l l, the gauge increases from that of the initial metal of the cup-shaped blank of Figure 9 to the open end. This increase in gauge is due to the fact that as the cup is decreased in diameter, the excess metal is not all used to increase the length, but some is worked so as to increase the thickness of the wall progressively from near the top to the open end, thus providingaI container body side wall which progressively increases in thickness. This not only facilitates manufacture, as hereinafter described, but also provides a container body of increased strength and rigidity.

As shown in Figure `13, the body portion has been finally formed and subsequent operations (Figures 14 to 22) form the top, neck and lip. In forming the. top and in partially forming the neck (Figgauge is uniform, or substantially so, throughout the height of the container.

'I'he neck is drawn to final form and the closed end 36 is severed as shown in Figure 18. Referring to Figures 18 and 19, the metal at the marginal edge 31 of the neck is now given a slight or portion outward curl, as shown at 38 in Figures 19 and 20. As shown in these figures, this curl is carried sufliciently to cause the edge to hem in a subsequent operation. We prefer that in this partial curl, the free edge of the metal be carried outwardly and downwardly to insure a proper folding and yhemming thereof during the second or nal curl.

The foregoing drawing operations illustrated in Figures 9 to 19, inclusive, may be performed following the method and by means of apparatus of the character disclosed in our Patent No. 2,337,182, dated December 21, 1943. In such apparatus, the dies are formed so as to permit and cause the metal to flow during the drawing operation to progressively increase the gauge from the top and lip portion to the bottom of the container during the drawing operation. Although the gauge of the metal increases from the top to the bottom of the container, there is no decrease in the internal diameter as shown by the drawgauge. l wall structure resistant to bending or denting and ings. this being due to the fact that the dies are of uniform diameter, as shown in the patent above mentioned. In other words, the variation in diameter corresponding to the gauge variation is entirely external. As described in said patent, the v.operations are immediately successive and uninterrupted, except for the .time required to transfer the`blanks from onel operation to another, and the cup is progressively reduced in diameter and increased in length substantially evenly and uniformly around its circumference so that relatively little trimming of the edge is` necessary after the drawing has been completed. Thereafter, as a continuous operation, the

metal above the inclined wall I is curled outwardly and inwardly to a partially curled bead, as shown at 39 in Figure 21. In this operation, the pre-curl 38 is formed into a hem 40 and aids in preventing splitting or cracking during the curling. The operation of forming the pre-curl 38 in the hem 40 is illustrated in Figure 23, wherein a curling die is diagrammatically illustrated, Figure 23 shows the successive steps in the hemmededge formation as the curling'die bends the precurled edge outwardly in progressing toward the hem and second curl shown in Figure 21. Figure 23 illustrates the intermediate stages in the tnv. the hardness does Inot exceed the hardness of the metal in the wall near the bottom of the container, notwithstanding the working involved in forming the neck. This reducing hardness of the wall from the bottom toward the top is due to the use of the least increased in gauge metal to serve for the top and lip of the container, and

thus aords forthe severe working involved in forming the lip, metal which is more suitable in characteristics hereinbefore described, to withstand this working than the metal at the other end. The variation in gauge is illustrated, for example, in Figure 25, wherein the metal originally used was substantially .0132 and was deoxidized cold rolled black plate. While this particular metal was initially .0132, we have used successfully metal of a gauge of .0125.

while we have described the container as having a cap-receiving portion, particularlyl adapted to receive a crown type of cap, this may be varied to receive'any of the usual commercially available" closures.

formation of the curl shown in Figure 21, and,

as will be observed, the edge is completely hemmed before the second curl, illustrated in Figure 21,

is well under way. This formation of the hem` substantially before the completion of the curling, as shown in Figure 23, serves'to prevent splitting of the edge during the severe working of the might be formed as an independent step prior` to the curling.

Thereafter, the curl 39 is closed by axially pressing the same toward the inclined walli5 and a hollow bead having a flat sealing surface 22' is formed as above described.

As will be observed, the sealing bead is curved to provide not only a sealing surface, but a locking shoulder as illustrated in Figures 1 to 5, inclusive. The curvature of this bead is of the character adapted to provide suillcient rigidity to resist the thrust applied during the application of a crown cap. This is likewise true of the curvature embodied in the form villustrated in Figure 7.

There is thus provided a container, the entire body, top and cap-receiving nish of which are drawn from a single blank in immediately succeeding drawing operations without the necessity for annealingI any portions of the blank between these operations, or thereafter. The container is lcharacterized by a wall structure in'`which the gauge of the wall metal increasesfrom the top or cap-receiving lip to the bottom of the container at or adjacent which it has the maximum This increasing gauge provides a strong one adapted to receive a seamed bottom in a flanging or bending operation. The wall strncture is further characterized by a substantially increased Rockwell hardness near Ithe bottom as compared to the top of the container which receives the capping force. In the neck of the In Figure 24 we have showna modified i'orm` of top portion which may be utilized in. any of the containers previously described. The novel distinguishing characteristics of the top shown in Fig. 24 include a series of grooves 4l spaced vertically along the conical top portion by intervening at portions I2. It will bev noted that these flat portions are all in the same conical surface or inclined plane, as viewed in cross-section (Fig. 24). By having intervening grooves, as distinguished from projections, a surface which is less likely to be marred in handling is provided, and the positioning of the ilat surfaces constituting a major portion of the conical top in the same inclined plane, as distinguished from stepping these surfaces or arranging them in different planes, permits a construction requiring less drawing of the initial shell shown in Fig. 9 than would be required if stepped flat surfaces ar' ranged in diil'erent planes are employed. In some instances, a grooved or irregular top, as distinguished from a at-surfaced top, such as shown in Figs. `l and 2, is found preferable. -In.

this figure, we` have shown an externally embossed ri'ng or bead 45, which together .with the projection formed by the bottom seam (Figs. 6

' and 25) will serveto protect` the decoration on the body of the container and also will strengthen the container at or adjacent the shoulder where the body merges into the top. This bead may be formed in any suitable manner, either during the drawing operation or subsequently. If desired, a similar bead adjacent the bottom may be used to advantage in the -form shown in Figs. 1 and 2 where' there is no external. projecting bottom seam. i

This application is acontinuation-in-part of our applications Serial No. 58,746, illed January ll, 1936 for Metal package and method of making same, and Serial No. 129,068, iled March 4, 1937, for Container and method of making same."

We claim:

f l. A metallic container for beer and similar beverages having a drawn body of substantially uniform diameter, a conical top integral with the body and smoothly joining vthe same, an upstanding neck of reduced diameter integral with the apex portion of said top whereby the body, top and neck are free of-side and top seams,

i the body having a separate bottom secured thereinwardly to provide a pouring lip and having an externally projecting shoulder of greater diameter than the immediately adjacent lowerk portion of the neck whereby to be adapted to lock thereon a crown cap, the shoulder having a curvature adapted to provide suicient rigidity to resist the thrust applied during application of a crown cap, the gauge of the metal of said container when drawn increasing in thickness substantially progressively from the neck to the bottom and the metal in the pouring lip being nearest the original thickness of the metal from which the container is drawn and being less drawn than the metal of the body of the container.

2. A metallic container for beer and similar beverages having a drawn body of substantially uniform diameter, a conical'top integral with the body and smoothly joining the same, an upstanding neck of reduced diameter integral with the apex portion of said top whereby the body, top and neck are free of side and top seams, the wall of the container increasing in thickness substantially progressively from the neck to the bottom. when drawn, the body having a separate bottom secured thereto, the neck having its mouth portion projected inwardly to provide a pouring lip and having an externally projecting shoulder formed by a substantially closed bead extending beyond the wall of the portion of the neck immediately therebelow and substantially contacting said wall wherebyto be adapted to lock thereon a crown cap, said bead having its inner edge hemmed, the shoulder having a curvature adapted to provide suiiicient rigidity to resist thethrust applied during applicationof a crown cap.

3. A metallic container for beer and similar beverages having an integral body, conical top and neck of reduced diameter terminatingin a iinish adapted to receive a crown cap, the body, top and neck having their entire axial and circumferential dimensions drawn from a single cupshaped blank. the bottom portion of which forms the top and neck, the wall of the container increasing in thickness substantially progressively from the neck to the bottom, the body being of substantially uniform diameter, the top beine,r conical and smoothly joining the body, said neck being integral with and joining the apex portion of the top and upstanding therefrom, whereby the body, top and neck are free of side and top seams, the body having a separate bottom secured thereto, the neck having its mouth portion projected inwardly to provide a sealing lip and having an externallyv projecting shoulder of greater diameter than the immediately adjacent lower portion of the neck whereby to be adapted to lockthereon a crown cap, the shoulder having a curvature adapted to provide suicient rigidity to resist thrust thereon during application of a crown cap.

4. A metal container for beer and other beverages having a cylindrical body and an integral frustro-conical top, said body and tom being drawn from a single blank whereby the container body and'top are devoid of side and top seams, the top having an upper portion above the cone thereof which has been least subjected to the drawing action and is of thinner gauge, lower Rockwell hardness and more ductile than the other metal of the containerl and a cap receiving nish formed from said upper portion.

5. A metallic container having a drawn body of substantially uniform cross-section, a conical top integral therewith ad a cylindrical neck of reduced diameter integral with -the apex portion of said top and upstanding therefrom whereby the body, top and neck are free of side and top seams, the neck having an inwardly bent wall portion dening a mouth and the metal extendingwfrom the mouth being turned outwardly into a bead projecting over said inwardly bent wall portion and beyond the wall of the neck portion immediately therebelow whereby to be adapted to form a locking shoulder for the skirt of a crown cap, said bead having its wall overlying the cutside surface of said inwardly bent wall portion substantially in contact with said portion and forming a substantially closed head, whereby the bead is supported to receive a crown cap.

6. A container having a drawn body, and a top anda neck integral therewith, the neck having a wall portion defining a mouth, and the metal extending from the mouth being turned outwardly into a bead projecting beyond the wall of the portion of the neck immediately therebelow whereby to be adapted to form a locking shoulder for the skirt of a crown cap, said beadl having its wall disposed adjacent to and completely overlying and concealing the outside surn face of said wall portion, whereby the bead is supported to receive a crown cap, and a crown cap crimped over said bead.

7. A container having a drawn integral body and conical top, the -top having a mouth portion formed by a wall projected inwardly and upwardly and terminating in an externally projecting outwardly curved portion forming a substantially closed bead providing 4a shoulder of greater diameter than the top portion immediately therebelow whereby to be adapted to lock thereon Sa crown cap, the lower portion of the bead substantially resting upon the inwardly projectingwall and having a curvature adapted to provide suicient rigidity to resist the thrust applied during application of a crown cap,

8. A container having a drawn integral body and top, the top having a mouth portion formed by a wall projected inwardly and upwardly and terminating in an externally projecting outwardly curved por-tion forming a substantially closed bead having a hemmed inner edge and providing a shoulder of greater diameter than the top portion immediately therebelow whereby to be adapted to lock thereon a crown cap, the bead substantially resting upon the inwardly projecting wall and having a curvature adapted to pro- Vvide suilicient rigidity to resist the thrust applied during application of a crown cap.

9. A drawn metal top for containers having an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall portion dening a mouth, and the metal extending from the mouth being turned outwardly into a circumferentially seamless bead having a locking shoulder for the skirt of a crown cap, and having a portion of its wall adjacent to and overlying the outside surface of said inclined wall portion substantially parallel and in contact with the inclined wall, whereby the bead is supported to receive a crown cap, said bead having its outer wall of arcuate curvature to provide a bead the cross-sectional dimensions of which along lines axial to the conl tainer increase in a direction radially outward of the container whereby to provide a relatively iiat top portion aicrding a substantial area of contact with the cushion liner of a cap.

10. A metal top for containers having a frustro-conical body portion terminating in an upstanding neck of reduced diameter extended to have a wall portion defining a mouth, and

by to form a locking shoulder for the skirt of a,

crown cap, said bead having a portion of its wall disposed substantially in contact with and in position to be supported by the outside surface oi' said wall portion. whereby the bead is supported to receive a crown cap. i

11. A drawn metal top for containers havin an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall portion deining a mouth and the metal extending from the mouth being turned outwardly into a closed circumferentially seamless bead having its inner edge parallel with and overlying the outside surface of the inclined wall portion and substantially in contact with said portion so as to be supported thereby and being of greater diameter than the portion oi' the top immediately therebelow 'whereby to form a locking shoulder for the skirt of a cap.

12. A drawn metal top for containers having an inwardly extending wall portion dening a mouth, the metal extending from the mouth being turned outwardly into a circumferentially seamless substantially closed bead of greater diameter than the wall portion immediately therebelow whereby to form a locking shoulder for the skirt of a crown cap, said bead having a hemmed edge disposed substantially in contact with and overlying the outside surface of said inwardly extending wall portion, whereby the bead is supported by the said wall portion to receive a crown cap.

13. A container having a drawn body whereby the same is devoid of side seams and an integral top, the top having an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall portion defining the container mouth and the metal extending from the mouth being turned outwardly into a closed bead having a hemmedinner edge portion overlying and completely concealing the outside surface of the inclined surface, the bead being of greater diameter than the surface of the top immediately therebelow and thereby forming a locking shoulder for the skirt of a cap, and a crown cap crimped over said bead.

14. A container having a drawn body and an integral top whereby the same is devoid of top and side seams, the top having an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall portion dening a mouth and the metal extending from the mouth being turned outwardly into a substantially closed bead having a hemmed inner edge portion disposed adjacent to and overlying and substantially contacting the outside surface of the inclined wall portion and forming a locking shoulder for a skirt of a cap extending outwardly beyond the wall of the top immediately therebelow.

15. A container having a drawn body, a conical top integral therewith and an upstanding neck of reduced diameter integral with the apex of said top 'whereby the body, top and neck are free of side and top seams, the neck having an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall portion defining the mouth of the container and the metal extending from the mouth being turned outwardly into a closed bead having a hemmed inner edge, the wall of the bead contacting surface to surfacevthe outside surface oi the mouth and forming a locking shoulder for a skirt of a cap extending outwardly beyond the wall of the neck immediately therebelow.

16. A container having a body and a top, the

seamless bead overlying the inclined wall portion in position to be supported thereby projecting upwardly from the top, the neck at its upper end having an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall portion deilning the container mouth and the metal extending from the mouth being turned outwardly into a closed circumferentiallyV seamless bead resting upon the outside surface of the inclined wall portion of the neck and pro- Jecting radially beyond the wall of the neck below the inclined wall portion to form a locking slimlider for the skirt of a cap.

19. A container having a body and a top provided with a pouring mouth, said mouth being formed from the metal of the top'by a wall extending from the top at an inward and upward inclination, the metal at the upperend of the inclined wall being turned outwardly into a closed circumferentially seamless bead 'overlying and substantially in engagement with the outside surface of said inclined wall. the bead being of greater diameter than the portion of the top immediately therebelow whereby to form a lockingV shoulder for the skirt oi' a crown cap, the inner edge of said bead being folded inwardly upon itself to provide a substantially hemmed edge portion.

20. A container having a drawn body providing side walls devoid of seams and a top provided with a pouring mouth, said mouth being formed from the metal of the top by a wall extending from the top at an inward and upward inclination, the metal at the upper end of the inclined wall being turned outwardly into a substantially closed circumferentially seamless bead overlying and substantially concealing the'outside surface of said incliied wall and substantially resting upon said wall, the bead being of` greater diameter than the portion of' the top immediately therebelow whereby to form a locking shoulderfor the skirt of a crown cap and a crown cap crimped over and interlocking withv said head.V

' 21. A container having a body of substantially cylindrical shape formed from a single piece of' metal devoid of seams and a top having its body portion of substantially conical shape and formed from a single piece of metal devoid of seams, said top including a neck of reduced diameter integral at one end with the apex of said conical body portion and terminating at its other end in an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall from which the metal is curled outwardly into a hollow bead forming a sealing lip and a locking shoulder for a. crown cap, said bead having its inner edge hemmed and overlying said inclined wall to be supported thereby and the bead extending outwardly beyond the Wall of the neck immediately therebelow. y

. 7 t'op'having an inwardly and vlliiilvldl' millineilw I wall portion defining the container mouth and" themetaiv extending from the wall portionbein'g? turned outwardly into a closed circumierentiallyh y and having a hemmed inner edge adjacent said wall portion, saidbead extending outwardly beyond the topf 22. A metallic container drawn from a single sheet of metal to form a body side wall, top and cap-receiving finish on'the top having an exter-` associo y'a pouring lip and projected outwardly to provide of the original sheet from which the container is drawn while the metal of the body is oia gauge 'in excess oi that of the original sheet and progressively increases in the direction of the bottom.

23. As an intermediate product in the formation of a container, a blank having a cylindrical body and a conical top formed with a neck, said blank having its neck substantially less worked and drawn than the other end of the blank and the wall of the blank increasing in gauge from the neck to the Yother end oi the blank, the neck having its mouth portion projected inwardly to provide a sealing lip and having an externally projecting shoulderof greater diameter than the immediately adjacent lower portion of the neck.

24. A method of forming a metallic container which consists in drawing a cup-shaped blank to form a cylindrical body, a conical top and a. neck at the 'closed end of the cup adaptedto be formed into a sealing lip when the closed end of the neck is removed, and controlling the ilow of the metal in the drawing operation to cause the gauge of the metal to progressively increase from substantially the neck to the other open end of the cupand'forining the end of the neck having the thinnestgauge and least worked metal and having a 'gauge nearest the gauge of the sheet from which?l the container is formed, with a mouth portion having a cap receiving sealing lip projecting inwardly and having projecting outwardly a shoulder-of greater diameter than the immediately adjacent lower portion of the neck.

25. A metallic container `for beer and similar beverages having a drawn body of substantially uniform diameter, a conical top integral with the body and smoothly joining the same, a neck integral with the apex portion of said top where..- by the body, top and neck are free of side and top seams, the body having a separate bottom secured thereto, the neck having its mouth portion projected inwardly to provide a pouring lip and curled outwardly into a substantially closed bead-f having a hemmed inner edge, said bead forniing an externally projecting shoulder oi greater diameter than the immediately adjacent lower portionof the neck whereby to be adapted to lock thereon a crown cap, the mouth portion and pouring lip including the externally project ing shoulder when drawn being formed of metal which is more ductile, and has a lower Rockwell hardness and thinner gauge than other metal of the wall of the container, the shoulder having a curvature adapted to provide suilicient rigidity to resist the thrust applied during application of a crown cap.

26. A metallic container for beer and similar beverages having a drawn body of substantially uniform diameter, a conical top integral with the body and smoothly joining the same, a neck integral with the apex portion of said top whereby the body, top and neck are free of side and top seems, the wall of the container increasing in thickness substantially'progressively from -the neckito the bottom when drawn, the body having a separate bottom secured thereto, the neck having its mouth portion projected inwardly to provide an externally projecting shoulder extending beyond the wall oi' the portion of the neck immediately therebelow whereby to be adapted to lock kthereon a crown cap, the mouth portion and pouring lip including the externally projecting shoulder being formed of metal of thinner gauge and nearest that of the original sheet from which the container is drawn, said lip portion being oi lower Rockwell hardness, and more ductility than other metal of the wall ofthe container, the shoulder having a curvature adapted to provide sufficient rigidity to resist the thrust applied during application of a crown cap.

27. A drawn metal top for containers having an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall portion defining a mouth, and the metal extending from the mouth being turned outwardly into a circumferentially seamless bead having a hemmed inner edge and having a locking shoulder for the skirt of a crown cap. said bead having a portion of its wall including the hemmed edge adjacent to and overlying the outside surface of said inclined wall portion substantially parallel and in contact with the inclined wall, whereby the bead is supported to receive a crown cap, said bead having its outer wall oi arcuate curvature to provide a bead the cross-sectional dimensions of which along lines axial to the container increase in a direction radially outward oi the container where- 4by to provide a relatively flat top portion aiordtop seams; the body having a separate bottom secured thereto, the neck having an inwardly and upwardly inclined wall portion defining a mouth, and the metal extending from the mouth being turned outwardly into a circumferentially seamless bead having a locking shoulder` for the skirt of a crown cap, and having a portion of its wall adjacent to and overlying the outside surface of said inclined wall portion substantially parallel and in contact with the inclined wall, whereby the bead is supported to receive a crown cap, said bead having its outer wall of arcuate curvature to provide a bead the cross-sectional dimensions of which along lines axial to the container increase in a direction radially outward of the container whereby to provide a relatively'ilat top portion aiIording a substantial area of contact lwith the cushion liner of a cap.

29. The method of making a crown finish on the end portion of a sheet metal reecptacle whichVY comprises providing a blank having a neck'ter- -minating at its upper end in an inwardly tapering frusto-conical portion and an upwardly projecting cylindrical portion of reduced diameter, curling the cylindrical portion outwardly and downwardly along a toroidal path to provide an outwardly curled bead of greater diameter than the base of said frusto-conical portion, and then axially pressing said bead to partially flatten the bead and to cause the lower curled end thereof to contact the outer surface of said frusto-conical portion along a line adjacent the base thereof.

30. The method of forming a top portion for a metal container having an integral neck and -cap receiving portion which comprises drawing from a metal blank a seamless substantially uniformly circular neck having an inwardly and upwardly directed shoulder and a neck portion of reduced diameter above said shoulder, bending the free edge of the neck portion outwardly into an initial open curl, curling the neck portion including said initial curl outwardly into a hollow beadof suiiiciently larger, diameter than the neck openingand the initial curl so that during the curling said initial curl is flattened to form a hemmed edge'in the formation of the hollow bead and pressing said bead upon the outer surface of said shoulder with the bead substantially resting thereon. y

31. The method of forming a top portion for a metal container having an integral neck and cap receiving portion which comprises drawing from a metal blank a seamless substantially uni-A formly circular neck having an inwardly and upwardly directed shoulder and a neck portion of reduced diameter above said shoulder, bending the free edge of `the neck portion above said shoulder outwardly and downwardly to provide a hem, curling the said neck portion including said bent edge outwardly and downwardly into a hollow bead of larger diameter than .the iirst outward and downward bend and said neck and pressing said bead into engagement with the shoulder and positioning the beadover said shoul der with a portion of the bead projecting beyond the wall of the neck to form a cap locking shoulder and with the bead substantially resting on said neck shoulder.

32. The method of forming a .top portion for a metal container having an integral neck and cap receiving portion which comprises drawing from a metal Iblank a seamless substantitally frustoconical top terminating at its smaller end in an upstanding seamless substantially uniformly circular neck having an inwardly and upwardly directed shoulder and a neck portion of reduced diameter above said shoulder, bending ,the free edge of the neck portion outwardly into an initial open curl, curling the neck portion including said initial curl outwardly into a hollow bead of sufllciently larger diameter than the neck opening and the initial curl so that during the curling said initial curl is flattened to form a hemmed edge in the formation of the hollow bead and pressing said bead upon the outer surface of said shoulder with the bead substantially resting there- I 33. The method of forming a top portion for a metal container having an integral neck and cap receiving portion which comprises drawing from a metal blank a seamless substantially frustoconical top terminating at its smaller end in an upstanding seamless substantially uniformly circular neck having an inwardly and upwardly directed shoulder and a neck portion of reduced diameter above saidv shoulder, bending the free I edge of the neck portion above said shoulder outl wardly and downwardly to provide a hem, curll i l l l l il.

ing the said neck portion including said bent v edge outwardly and downwardly into a hollow bead of larger diameter than the first outward and downward bend and said neck and pressing said bead into engagement with the shoulder and positioning the bead over said shoulder with a portion of the bead projecting beyond the wall of the neck to form a cap locking shoulder and with the bead substantially resting on said neck shoulder.

34. The method of making container body blanks of the can type devoid of seams and having a body, top, and cap nish comprising drawing a cup-shaped blank of sheet metal and increasing its length and decreasing its diameter so as to form a cylindrical body having a closed end, drawing said body and forming a frusto-conical top portion integral with and extending from the cylindrical body and a cylindrical neck portion' at the top of the frusta-conical portion and integral therewith having an inwardly and upwardly directed shoulder and a neck portion of reduced diameter above said shoulder, bending the free edge of the neck portion outwardly into an initial open curl, curling the neck portion including said initial curl outwardly into a hollow bead of sufficiently larger diameter than the neck opening and the initial curl so that during the curling said initial curl is iiattened to form a hemmed edge in the formation of the hollow bead and pressing said bead upon the outer surface of said shoulder with the bead substantially resting thereon.

35. The method of making container body blanks of the can type devoid of seams and havend, drawing said body and forming a frustoconical top portion integral with and extending from the cylindrical body and a cylindrical neck portion at the top of the truste-conical portion and integral therewith having an inwardly and upwardly directed shoulder and a neck portion of reduced diameter above said shoulder, bending the free edge of the neck portion above said shoulder outwardly and downwardly to provide a hem, curling the said neck portion including said bent edge outwardly and downwardly into a hollow bead of larger diameter than the iirst outward and downward bend and said neck and pressing said bead into engagement with the shoulder and positioning the bead over said shoulder with a portion of the bead projecting beyond the wall of the neck to form a cap locking shoulder and with the bead substantially resting-on said neck shoulder.

AMOS CALLESON. EDGAR A. CALLESON.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification220/658, 220/906, 413/4, 220/62
International ClassificationB65D8/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D7/04, Y10S220/906
European ClassificationB65D7/04