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Publication numberUS2385176 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 18, 1945
Filing dateOct 20, 1943
Priority dateOct 20, 1943
Publication numberUS 2385176 A, US 2385176A, US-A-2385176, US2385176 A, US2385176A
InventorsWhite Hobart S
Original AssigneeWhite Hobart S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telescope sight mount
US 2385176 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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Patented Sept. 18, 1945 Scent UNITED STATES vPATENT ,OFFICE 6 Claims.

This invention relates to a mount or means whereby a telescopic sight may be supported on a rie or other firearm in a manner such that the telescope sight will always be in accurate alignment with the bore of the firearm when in use.

In particular, the invention is designed to provide a simple and durable structure which permits quick detaching of the telescope from the rifle and allows clip-loading bolt action rifles to be loaded from clips without detaching the telescope. The mount enables the telescope to be Y l; osition to clip-loading position and vice versa in a second or less.

V The use of iron sights on the rifle is permitted ,by shifting the telescop to the cl 0 q ng posi- "tioni e cies, or n e e cing the telescope when the use of iron receiver peep sights is desired. The mount does not interfere with the conventional base for receiver peep sights.

It should be understood that the term shooting position refers to the position of the telescope directly over the bore of the rifle, and the term clip-loading position denotes the position when the telescope is swung upward and to the left for inserting a clip of cartridges in the gun or for using iron sights on the gun.

Fundamentally, the mount is a structure having a shaft attachable to a telescope and which is journaled in a suitable sleeve mounted on the receiver of the gun. The sleeve has a slot enabling detachment and attachment of the shaft, and also has enlargements in the slot, or notches, engageable by arms extending from the shaft to the telescope, said notches permitting the swinging of the telescope from clip-loading position to shooting position and vice versa.

The more specific objects and advantages will become apparent from a consideration of the following description taken in connection with accompanying drawing illustrating an operative embodiment.

In said drawing- Figure 1 is a view in side elevation showing my improvements applied to a rifle, the latter being fragmentary;

Figure 2 is a top or plan view offthe parts of Figure l;

Figure 3 is a vertical section taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is a cross-sectional view passing through the plane of the click latch used for the telescope mounting shaft; and

Figure 5 is a longitudinal section taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 3.

Referring specifically to the drawing wherein like reference characters designate like or similar parts, Il! represents a small firearm such as a Model '70 Winchester rifle. It is to be understood that my improvements may be used on firearms, particularly the small type; generally. Of such rifle I0, the barrel is shown at II and the receiver at I2, the illustrations being fragmentary.

A conventional sighting telescope shown at I3 in the drawing is in shooting position, directly over and almost touching the receiver. It is, however, movable in the path of the arrow at the top of Figure 3, s0 as to be placed in clip-loading position, that is the positioning that facilitates the loading of the rie from clips or the use of iron sights. l

Said telescope I3 is carried by a rod or shaft which may be hollow as shown, or solid, as preferred, and from which a pair of clamp arms I5 extend radially, the same being integral with or Welded to the shaft I4. The clamps are slit and somewhat resilient as shown, in order to have bands I6 encircling the telescope tightly clamped thereto by means of screws I'I passing loosely through openings I8 in terminal arms I9 of the clamps and being screw-threaded in openings 20 in the main portion of such clamps. I'hus the telescope may be adjustably and removably secured to the rod or shaft I4.

Said shaft or rod I4 is snugly journaled 4in a sleeve or barrel 2I of a suitable mount generally designated 22. The mount is secured in place as by means of screws 23 directly to the receiver I2, as shown.

The sleeve or barrel 2| has a longitudinal slot 24 in the top thereof and extending from end to end, and the sleeve along one side of its Wall at the slot 24 is enlarged to provide notches at 25. By reason of this construction, the shaft I4 may be applied to thel sleeve by sliding it longitudinally into the latter with the clamp arms I5 passing through the slot 24 to a position where they may be turned on the axis of the shaft, into and out of the notches 25. y

By tightening the tapered thread screw caps 32, the sleeve 2I may frictionally bind the shaft I4 to any desired degree inV order to hold the shaft and accordingly the clamp arms I5 and telescope in any desired position of adjustment or swinging of the arc suggested at the top of Figure 3.

In both the ring or shooting position, as shown in the drawings, and the clip-loading position to which the parts maybe swung, as suggested .by the curve in Figure 3, they are adapted to be 55 held -by a, suitable latch 26, engageable in the respective positions mentioned with recesses at 21 and 28, provided in the rod or shaft I4. Latch 26 may be of any desired shape, for instance that shown, or even a ball. A housing 29 is detachably screw-threaded or otherwise attached to the sleeve 2l and it mounts the latch 26 and the coil spring 3D. The coil spring 30 is retained by a press flt plug 3|, or other suitable means. It will thus be seen that the shaft or rod I4 and the telescope are adapted to be latched in both the shooting and clip-loading positions. The latch will be displaced automatically as the telescope is moved from one position to the other and will also produce a click in so doing.

I preferably provide means to close the ends of the slots 24 and such means may take, for example, the form of caps 32 screw-threaded or otherwise detachably connected at 32 to tapered screw portions at the terminals of the sleeve 2|. These caps can normally be manipulated by hand after the shaft I4 is in place and removed singly or together, as preferred, in detaching or replacing the shaft.

If desired, coin slots 34 may be provided diametrically on the caps 32 to facilitate application and removal by means of a, coin or screw driver. Such caps 32 are also preferably externally knurled as shown.

Various changes may be resorted to provided they fall within the spirit and scope of the invention. In particular, the sleeves may be made thicker at each end, so as to strengthen the ends and make the use of end caps 32 unnecessary.

I claim as my invention:

1. A telescope sight mount for rifies and the like, comprising a shaft adapted to be attached to a telescope with arms extending radially from the shaft to telescope-mounting clamps, said shaft snugly but rotatably journaled in a sleeve mount adapted to be connected to a firearm with sleeve parallel to the bore of the firearm, said sleeve mount having a longitudinal slot to accommodate the clamp arms and thus enable longitudinal insertion of the shaft into the sleeve and detachment of the shaft from the sleeve, the sleeve having notches forming enlargements of the slot lo cated so as to enable the clamp arms to move into and out of the same circumferentially with respect to the sleeve so that a telescope may be moved from clip-loading to shooting position and vice versa.

2. A telescope sight mount for rifles and the like, comprising a shaft adapted to be attached to a telescope with arms extending radially from the shaft to telescope-mounting clamps, said shaft snugly but rotatably journaled in a sleeve mount adapted to be connected to a firearm with sleeve parallel to the bore of the firearm, said sleeve mount having a longitudinal slot to accommodate the clamp arms and thus enable longitudinal insertion of the shaft into the sleeve and detachment of the shaft from the sleeve, the sleeve having notches forming enlargements of the slot located so as to enable the clamp arms to move into and out of the same circumferentially with respect to the sleeve so that a telescope may be moved from clip-loading to shooting position and vice versa, and means coacting with the sleeve to adjust snugness of fit around shaft and reinforce sleeve.

3. A telescope sight mount'for rifles and the like, comprising a shaft adapted to be attached to a telescope with arms extending radially from the shaft to telescope-mounting clamps, said shaft snugly but rotatably journaled in a sleevemount adapted to be connected to a firearm with sleeve parallel to the bore of the firearm, said sleeve mount having a longitudinal slot. to accommodate the clamp arms and thus enable 1ongitudinal insertion of the shaft into the sleeve and detachment of the shaft from the sleeve, the sleeve having notches forming enlargements of the slot located so as to enable the clamp arms to move into and out of the same circumferentially with respect to the sleeve so that a telescope may be moved from clip-loading to shooting position and vice versa, and means coacting with the sleeve to adjust snugness of fit around shaft and reinforce sleeve, said means being caps screw-threaded to the sleeve ends with tapered threads.

4. A telescope sight mount for rifles and the like, comprising a shaft adapted to be attached to a telescope with arms extending radially from the shaft to telescope-mounting clamps, said shaft snugly but rotatably journaled in a sleeve mount adapted to be connected to a firearm with sleeve parallel to the bore of the firearm, said sleeve mount having a longitudinal slot to accommodate the clamp arms and thus enable longitudinal insertion of the shaft into the sleeve and detachment of the shaft from the sleeve, the sleeve having notches forming enlargements of the slot located so as to enable the clamp arms to move into and out of the same circumferentially with respect to the sleeve so that a telescope may be moved from clip-loading to shooting position and vice verse, and catch means between the shaft and sleeve to retain the shaft in positions corresponding to shooting and cliploading, the catch means comprising a housing on the sleeve, a spring-loaded latch mounted in the housing, the latch engaging appropriate recesses on the shaft automatically when the shaft is turned to the above positions.

5. A telescope sight mount for rifles and the like, comprising a shaft adapted to be attached to a telescope with arms extending radially from the shaft to telescope-mounting clamps, said shaft snugly but rotatably journaled in a sleeve mount adapted to be connected to a firearm with sleeve parallel to the bore of the firearm, said sleeve mount having a longitudinal slot to accommodate the clamp arms and thus enable longitudinal insertion of the shaft into the sleeve and detachment of the shaft from the sleeve, the sleeve having notches forming enlargements of the slot located so as to enable the clamp arms to move into and out of the same circumferentially with respect to the sleeve so that a telescope may be moved from clip-loading to shooting position and vice versa, means coacting with the sleeve to adjust snugness of fit around shaft and reinforce sleeve, said means being caps screw-threaded to the sleeve ends with tapered threads, and catch means between the shaft and sleeve to retain the shaft in positions corresponding to shooting and clip-loading, the catch means comprising a housing on the sleeve, a spring-loaded latch mounted in the housing, the latch engaging appropriate recesses on the shaft automatically when the shaft is turned to the above positions.

6. A telescope sight mount for rines and the like, comprising a mounting having a longitudinal sleeve adapted to be attached to a firearm with sleeve parallel to the bore of the firearm, a shaft snugly but rotatably journaled in the sleeve, clamp means extending radially from the shaft to mount a telescope, a longitudinal slot at the vu unulvinlluurii. anni nuwlLw lo.

top of the sleeve to accommodate the clamp means when inserting the shaft in the sleeve and allowing removal of the shaft with telescope from the sleeve, enlargements of the slot to fit the clamp means extending from the shaft when the telescope is in shooting position, the clamp means being movable into and out of the slot enlargements when the shaft is turned for bringing the telescope from clip-loading to shooting position and vice versa, caps fastened to the sleeve at each end, the ends of said sleeve being tapered externally and in screw-threaded engagement with the internally tapered caps so as to reinforce the ends from opening at the slot and to adjust snugness of fit of the sleeve around the shaft ends as tightening the caps tends to close the slot and contract the sleeve radially at the ends, recesses in the shaft corresponding to shooting and cliploading positions, a housing on the sleeve, and a spring-loaded ball-end plunger click latch mounted by the housing and automatically engageable and disengageable with the recesses through turning of the shaft.

HOBART S. WHITE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2445087 *Oct 21, 1946Jul 13, 1948Rogers Earl BGun sight
US2529801 *Mar 31, 1947Nov 14, 1950Fisk George DHinged telescope gun sight mount
US2571935 *May 10, 1946Oct 16, 1951Howard Stokes RogerTelescopic sight mount
US2639507 *Dec 19, 1949May 26, 1953Pachmayr Frank ALatch means for telescopic gun sights
US7290660Jul 20, 2005Nov 6, 2007Tilman Paul AStorage system having a disposable vacuum bag
US7857514Dec 12, 2006Dec 28, 2010Reynolds Foil Inc.Resealable closures, polymeric packages and systems and methods relating thereto
US8438773Jun 2, 2011May 14, 2013OptiFlow, Inc.Articulating mount for weapon sight accessory
US8793921 *May 2, 2013Aug 5, 2014Brian TonelloTangent integrated tilt sight
DE1029267B *Apr 4, 1953Apr 30, 1958Armes De Guerre Fab NatLagerung des Zielfernrohrs an einer automatischen Handfeuerwaffe
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/128
International ClassificationF41G1/387, F41G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41G11/008
European ClassificationF41G11/00B8F