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Publication numberUS2385732 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 25, 1945
Filing dateJul 16, 1943
Priority dateJul 16, 1943
Publication numberUS 2385732 A, US 2385732A, US-A-2385732, US2385732 A, US2385732A
InventorsRedding William Halbert
Original AssigneeRedding William Halbert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Barometer interpreter
US 2385732 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 25, 1945 w. H. REDDING 2,335,732

' BAROME'IIER INTERPRETER Filed July 16, 1945 Patented Sept. 25, 1945 UNITED STATES PATEN OFFICE 2,385,732 V "BAROMETER INTEBBRETER WilliamHalbertzltedding; lhil'adelphia, Pa. I Ap lication Jul-y 16, 1943-, Serial No. 495,020

The principalobjectof this invention is to provide an inexpensive device for interpretin barometer readings and for indicating simply and intelligiblythe significanceof the. barometric indications. I

In the attacheddrawing, Fig. l is a face view of an interpreter made in accordance with the invention;

. Fig. 2 is a sectionon the line 22. Fig. 1, and Fig. 3 is an exploded perspective View showing the three major elements of the device.

With referenceto the drawing, the device consists essentiall'yflf three discs designated [,2 and 3 respectively which. maysuitably he made .of

cardboard orany other-sufficiently strongand durable sheetv material. These .discs,.as. hestshown in Fig. 2, are secured together in concentric, .relationby means of a rivet Asothat they maybe rotated one with respect to the others. v'Ihedisc I, which constitutes the base elementris of greatest diameter and carries in .theeouter peripheral portion thereof a scale Iilcorresponding to the dial scale of .a barometer, the main divisions oi this scale represented by the numbers 27 to 30 indicating atmospheric pressures and the secondary divisions represented by the numbers. ,1 to 9 indicating tenths of the main division, .all in accordance with .barometic practice. Inside of the scale .i, thedisc I contains .a number of radial lines or markings G which divide areas of the disc surface at. opposite sides. of the pin 4 into a. number of segmental sections indicated. ge erally by the referenceenumeral v'l, as best shown in Fig. 3. Each one. of. these segmental sections contains a legend pertaining to. weather conditions .in terms of forecast and the segments. are arranged on the disc with respect tothe scale 5 in a manner to afford, in conjunction with the discs 2 and 3 as hereinafter described, an accurate forecast of the weather basedllpon any given barometric reading.

Actually, .the segmental spaces are divided into two groups which appear respectively at opposite sides of the disc center as viewedin Fig. 3.

The disc 2 contains. two radially disposed se mental apertures or windows 8 and 9 and these apertures are adapted to register, withjthe segmental spaces 1 of the underly n disc I, the legends on this latter disc being covered and rendered invisible by the-disc 2 except as to those which, in any position of relative adjustment of the discs I and 2, may appear through the windows 8 and 9. The disc 2 comprises also a pointer 9 which may be formed as an integral part of the disc, as illustrated. The apertures 8 and 8 .are'arranged at oppositev sides of thedisc 2.50 as to coact respectively-with :the. segmental sections "or the separate groups referred to above.

The disc 3,-which in assembly .overlies the disc 2-, also comprises i two radially disposed segmental atthe sametime. When, for-example, the apertures8anct istra-re inemgistration, as in Fig. 1, the-aperture 8/01 the: disc 2, which is indicated in broken lines in 1,. will occupy a position otfsetrf-rom theaperture I2 of the disc 3. -When the apertures :9 and I2 register with each other, the aperture 8 will be correspondingly displaced with respect to the aperture H. The disc 320011- tains also a segmental 'slot- I3 which is positioned so as. to receive the pointer element 9 of the disc Zin the manner-shown in Fig. 1. Slot I3 is concentric withxthe discs so that relative movement between the discs hand -3 -is permitted, although angularextent-of this relative movement is limited by the lengthoi =the slot. This slotis dimensioned to permit relative movement of the discs .2 and 3 to an extent required to bring the re- .spective pairs of apertures =8--I' I and 9-H selectively into registered condition. With reference to-Fig. 1,.-it will be noted thatv when, the pointer 9 is alt-the. right-hand end of the slot 13, the apertures'8. and II will be inregistration; and when the pointer 9 is at the opposite end of theslot I3, as indicated in broken-.lineathe apertures 9 and 12. will be in registration. The disc .3 also carriesatits periphery/a projecting pointer II which coacts with the scale .5 on the disc I, as

shown in Fig. .1, whereby the disc may be placed in predetermined position with respect to the disc I in accordance with 'the barometer reading. The operation oi thedevice is as follows:

The. barometer reading, is taken both as to pressure and to direction in which the pressure maybe undergoing change. Let it be assumed, for example, that thebarometer shows a pressure of 30.4 and isrising. The disc 3 is then adjusted with respect to the disc. I so that the pointer I4 is, directed .to' 30A onthe scale 5' (seeFig. 1).

Also since the pressure is rising, the discs Zand 3 are relatively adjusted so that the pointer '9 will be directed to the marking I-5 on the face of the disc 3 which is designated by the word risthese circumstances, displaced from the aperture l2 of the disc 3 so that the solid underlying that this forecast is generally fair, probably cool,

Fig." 1 the legend storm -ticul'ar barometer reading.

position for indicating particular relationships between that position and at least two non-"coni ing, the said pointer then being at the right hand end of the slot I3 and the apertures 8 and I l of the discs 2 and 3 being in registration with each other. The window 9 of the disc 2 is, in

portion of the disc 2 will obstruct the latter aperture. The registered apertures 8 and II, however, will expose a portion of the face of the disc I containing the segmental sections 1 and one of these sections w iil register with the apertures and will 'be visible therethroughj The legend appearing in this segment will give the weather forecast in accordance with the barometric readL-J ing, and in the present instance, it is to. be noted variable winds. This forecast in other' words corresponds to a reading of 30.51 on the barome; v ter scale under rising pressure conditions. If however, the pressure, as indicated 10 .1 w'the. barometer, is 30.4 and the pressure is falling, the

pointer!) would then'be shifted to the left hand "end of the slot 13 to a po'sition'opposite the marking IS on the'face of the disc 3 which bears the designation ffalling. Under these condi- 5 tions, the apertures 8 and II willbe out of registration' but the aperture 9 will have been moved to'a position under theaperture l2 so that a segmental sectiorrof the surface of the disc will be visible therethroug'h. This will be in the area at the opposite side of the disc occupied by the other group of segmental sections-and as indicated in brewing in direction of winds will appear.

f It will be apparent that' for'some settings of the discs, parts of two of the segmental sections- 1 "may appear within the registered apertures of thej'discs 2"and 3a I'he legend's however appearing predominate in the window will nevertheless 'constitute-the proper forecast for the par- 40 1. In "a barometer interpreter, a base element carrying 'afbaro'rnetric scale and a plurality of legends related to weather forecast and differing 4: as to position with respect to the scale, and a secill 'ond element relatively adjustable with respect to the base element to selective positions on the scale andhaving meansjefiective in any scale tig uous legends of saidplurality, one'of said relafltionships pertaining to a rising and the other to a falling barometric pres'sureand means for indicating which of said relationships pertains to the said rising and which to the said falling presr V 1" f I 2. In a barometer interpreter, a base element "carrying abarometric scale and a plurality of legends relatedto weather forecast and differing as to position with respectto thev scale, and a second element relatively adjustable with respect to the base element to'selective positionsv on the scale'jand having means effective in any scale position for indicating, particular relationships be- V tween that position; andat least two non-con- 'tiguous legends of said plurality, one of said relationships pertaining to a rising and the other to a falling barometric pressure, and means relatively adjustable with respect to the second elementlin accordance with a changing pressure conditionfor rendering said indicating means mefiective forindicating one or other of said rel ig i ip 3.. In a barometer interpreter, base element carrying barometric scale, and a plurality of legends related to weather. forecasts and differing as to position with respect to the scale, said legends being divided into two groups one of V which groups pertainsto a rising and the other to a falling barometric pressure condition and a second element relatively adjustable with respect to the base element to selective positions on the scale and having means effective in any scale position for indicating particular relationships between that position and at least one of the legends of each of said groups. 7 v 4. In a barometer interpreter, a base element carrying. an annularly arranged barometric scale and a plurality of legends referring to weather tvforecasts' similarly annularly arranged at the inner.s ide of said scale and related to the latter,

a disc rotatably secured to the base'element conmentrical with the scale and' overlying said legends, means providing for adjustment of said f'disc to any given position with respect to the sc ale,'said'disc having therein a pair" of apertures through which, two separate ianddilferent of said legends are exposed whenthe disc is in the said adjusted positions, and means adjustablewith respect to the disc forblanlgin'g 'out (ins orthe other of said apertures in accordance with the direction of change in barometric pressure.

In a barometer interpreter, a base element carrying an annularly arranged barometric scale, and a plurality of legends referring to weather forecasts in similarannular arrangements at the .inner side of said scale and related' to' the lat- ,ter, said legends being separated into two'separate groups,a disc rotatably secured to the base element concentrical with the'scale andfover- Ilying said legends, means providing for adjust' ment of said disc to any given'position withrespeot to the'scale, said 'disc having therein a pair i'of apertures associated respectively with said groups of legends and through which one legend .at least of each of said groups is 'exposedwhen the disc is in the adjusted positions andmea ns adjustable with respect to the disc for blanking but one or other of said japertures inaccordance with the direction of change in barometric pressure.

6. Ina barometer interpreter, a base element .carrying an annularly arranged barometric scale, and a plurality of legends referring-to weather forecasts insimilar annulararrangements at 'the inner side of said scale andrelated'to the latter, said legends being separated into two separate groups, a disc rotatably secured to the baseel'ement" c0,ncentrical with the scale and overlying blank out the respective apertures injthe latter'in accordance, with ,the direction of change in barometric pressure. in n I H

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2427976 *Jun 8, 1944Sep 23, 1947Posson Chester ATax withholding chart
US2508273 *Mar 30, 1948May 16, 1950Irving P KrickWeather forecasting device
US2521930 *Sep 10, 1945Sep 12, 1950Mcpartlin William DTrig-meter
US2532061 *Mar 25, 1946Nov 28, 1950Murry GlickFishing guide
US2532984 *Apr 20, 1948Dec 5, 1950Tihiflgs CorpoPerpetual calendar
US2640280 *May 29, 1950Jun 2, 1953Irving StoneChild's drawing device
US2854765 *Nov 2, 1955Oct 7, 1958Ida RicklessEducational device descriptive of weather conditions
US2924025 *May 6, 1957Feb 9, 1960 Question and answer device
US2989811 *Jul 1, 1960Jun 27, 1961Bradley Milton CoEducation device for teaching decimals and fractions
US3364599 *Jul 30, 1965Jan 23, 1968Nathan PolskyEducational device for teaching time
US3418728 *Jul 27, 1966Dec 31, 1968Ramon E. CouceyroPunch card interpreter
US3513568 *Aug 28, 1967May 26, 1970Shuford Emir H JrEducational device
US3529366 *Sep 5, 1967Sep 22, 1970Le Roy V AlwinDevice for correlating three input variables
US3534905 *Jul 3, 1968Oct 20, 1970Leo KullMenstrual cycle indicating device
US4756423 *Aug 7, 1986Jul 12, 1988Holtsch MetallwarenherstellungIndicator for taking medication
DE19500218C1 *Jan 5, 1995Feb 29, 1996Foerster & Rothmann GmbhPressure manometer, e.g. for use in filter systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/217, 40/495
International ClassificationG01L19/08, G01L19/16
Cooperative ClassificationG01L19/08, G01L19/16
European ClassificationG01L19/16, G01L19/08