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Publication numberUS2385915 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1945
Filing dateMar 20, 1944
Priority dateMar 20, 1944
Publication numberUS 2385915 A, US 2385915A, US-A-2385915, US2385915 A, US2385915A
InventorsElias Blanco, Oakley Hagedorn David
Original AssigneeElias Blanco, Oakley Hagedorn David
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Connector socket
US 2385915 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 2, 1945. D. o. HAGEDORNWET AL 2,385,915

CONNECTOR SOCKET I Filed March 20, 1944 T I lOb I IS 27 7 11. v E: n to 1'5 m mfg,

JD :1 via! UnkfeL Hagclarn:

Patented bet. 2, 1945 CONhlECTOR. SOCKET David Oakley Hagedorn and Elias Blanco, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application March 20, 1944, Serial No. 527,257

Claims.

The general purpose of this invention is the provision of a simple, effective socket for electrical connections, and one which is economical in manufacture and highly reliable in use. The typical and illustrative form of socket which is described in the following detailed description is adapted particularly to use asone member of a wire or cable connector; but it will be understood that that form'and particular use of the invention are but typical and that the invention may be put to uses other than that of forming a wire or cable terminal.

There are several different aspects of novelty in the invention, which will be best understood after consideration of the specific and illustrative embodiment which will be explained in detail. For the purpose of that detailed explanation reference is made to the accompanying drawing in which,

a piece of seamless tubing) the feature of the invention to which I am now-referring resides in improved formation of the tubular body. Preferably, as will be described, that tubular body is formed by rolling a sheet metal blank into tubuformation is'secured by an extended rolling op- Fig. 1 is a plan of a typical sheet metal blank from which the socket is formed;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a completed socket;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section of a completed socket, and taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 5,

Figs. 4, 5, 6 and 7 are enlarged cross sections taken respectively on lines 44, 5-5, 66 and 1-1 of Fig. 2, and

Fig. 6a is a section similar to that of Fig. 6, showing a variant.

In the present preferred form of the invention the major portion of the socket consists of ambular formation, preferably cylindric. This cylindric formation is adapted at one end to receive a standard connector pin, also preferably cylindric. The other end of the cylindric formation is formed into a solder cup for the reception and soldering of a wire or cable, when the socket is used as a wire or cable terminal or as one member of a wire or cable connector. The formation of the wire-receiving solder cup" is one of the novel aspects of my invention; the cup being so formed, by formation of the wall of the tubular body, that the solder cup is entirely isolated from the pin-receiving interior of the tubular body. The solder cup formation therefore completely excludes the possibility of solder entering the pin-receiving portion of the socket and thus interfering with the proper and free reception of the pin or interfering with the making of a good electrical connection.

Another feature of the invention resides in the formation of the tubular pin-receiving body of the socket. .Although it is of course possible, as will be recognized, that the tubular body portion be constructed without joints or seams (as from eration which rolls about the tube one or. more straps which are initially formed as integral extensions of the original blank. In a tube which is formed in that manner, the wound straps perform the function of holding the rolled tube to its proper form and dimensions,v and the slit (and/or the wound straps) give to the tube a certain amount of resilient diametral expansibil ity which assures good contact with a connector pm.

The foregoing and other and further detailed aspects of the invention will be now more fully understood from the following specific description of the particular illustrative embodiment of the invention which is preferred for practical i use.

In the drawing the original sheet metal blank is shown in Fig. 1, comprising, in this "case, a rectangular body portion l0 and two straps II and I2 which extend laterally from one of the longitudinaledges of body l0. In the form here shown, oneof the straps I2, is located at or near one end of blank body I0; and the other strap II is spaced from strap 12 and located between the two ends of body In. An end portion, 10a, of body l0 extends (to the left in the drawing) beyond strap ll. And the portion lb of the body, lying between straps II and I2, is here shown as provided with a longitudinal slit l3, for purposes which will appear. The length of blank body I0 corresponds to the length of the finished socket including the solder cup, as will appear; and the transverse width dimension W of the blank body corresponds generally to the circumferential dimension of the formed socket. The'length dimensions L of the straps II and I2 is preferably substantially greater than the dimension W, for purposes which will also appear. Starting with such a blank as is shown in Fig. 1, the blank is rolled about a longitudinal axis, using blank edge 20 as the starting edge. The rolling is preferably done at such a diameter that the resulting cylinder which is formed-from body the tubular body wall and the inner cup wall being an integral extension of the remaining arcuate portion of the tubular body wall but relatively reversed in curvature, the inner cup wall being integral with the outer cup wall and in direct contact with it.

3. An electric connector socket, comprising as one integral unit a tubular body and a semi-tubular conductor-receiving solder cup extending from one end of the tubular body, the cup being of arcuate cross-section and double-walled, the outer and inner cup walls being integral with each other and with the body wall, and the outer cup wall body wall being longitudinally slitted with a continuous slit throughout their lengths.

4. An electric connector socket comprisin as one integral unit a tubular body and a semi-tubular conductor-receiving solder cup extending from one end of the tubular body, the cup being of arcuate cross-section and double-walled, the outer and inner cup walls being integral with each other and with the body wall, and the outer cup wall and body wall being longitudinally slitted with a continuous slit throughout their lengths, and a spirally wound strap extending integrally from the tubular body wall at one edge of the slit and surrounding the tubular wall.

5. An electric connector socket comprising as one integral unit a tubular body and a semi-tubular conductor-receiving solder cup extending from one end of the tubular body, the cup being of arcuate cross-section and double-walled, the outer and inner cup walls being integral with each other and With the body wall, and the outer cup wall and body wall being longitudinally slitted with a continuous slit throughout their lengths, and a spirally wound strap extending integrally from the tubular body wall at one edge of the slit and surrounding a portion of the tubular body wall adjacent its other end.

6. An electric connector socket comprising as one integral unit a tubular body and a semi-tubular conductor-receiving solder cup extending from one end of the tubular body, the cup being of arcuate cross-section and double-walled, the outer and inner cup walls being integral with each other and with the body wall, and the outer cup wall and body wall being longitudinally slitted with a continuous slit throughout their lengths, and a spirally wound strap extending integrally from the tubular body wall .at one edge of the slit and surrounding a portion of the tubular body walladjacent the cup.

'7. An electric connector socket, comprising as one integral unit a tubular body and a semi-tubular conductor-receiving solder cup extending from one end of the tubular body, the cup being of arcuate cross-section and double-walled, the outer and inner cup walls being integral with each other and with the body wall, and the outer cup wall and body wall being longitudinally slitted with a continuous slit throughout their lengths, and two spirally wound straps extending integrally from the tubular body wall at one edge of the slit and, respectively, surrounding portions of the tubular wall adjacent the cup and adjacent the opposite body end.

'8. An electric connector socket, comprising as one integral unit a tubular body and a semi-tubular conductor-receiving solder cup extending from one end of the tubular body, the cup being of arcuate cross-section and double-walled, the outer and inner cup walls being integral with each other and with the body wall, the outer cup wall and body wall being longitudinally slitted with a continuous slit throughout their lengths, and the body wall having at least one other longitudinally extending wall slit spaced circumferentially from the first mentioned slit.

9. An electric connector socket, comprising as one integral unit a tubular body and a semi-tubular conductor-receiving solder cup extending from one end of the tubular body, the cup being of arcuate cross-section and double-walled, the outer and inner cup walls being integral with each other and with the body wall, and the outer cup wall and body wall being longitudinally slitted with a continuous slit throughout their lengths, and two spirally wound straps extending integrally from the tubular body wall at one edge of the slit and respectively, surrounding portions of the tubular wall adjacent the cup and adjacent the opposite body end, and the body wall having another wall slit extending longitudinally between the two wall-surrounding straps and spaced circumferentially from the first mentioned slit.

10. In electric connector sockets of the type comprising a tubular pin-receiving body, the improvement which comprises that the tubular body wall has a longitudinal slit extending throughout its length, and two spirally wound straps extending integrally from the tubular body wall at one edge of the slit and, respectively, surrounding portions of the tubular wall adjacent the two body ends, and the body having also at least one other longitudinal wall slit extending between the two wall-surrounding straps and circumferentially spaced from the first mentioned slit.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2689337 *Apr 4, 1952Sep 14, 1954BurttShaped metal contact
US2954540 *Dec 12, 1957Sep 27, 1960Gen Precision IncBrush block
US3121602 *Apr 27, 1962Feb 18, 1964Ulrich TuchelConnector
US3249910 *Jul 19, 1963May 3, 1966Emerick TothElectrical connector with solder resistant surfaces
US5209681 *Mar 26, 1992May 11, 1993Amp IncorporatedElectrical contact with the anti-solder wicking tab
US5340230 *Dec 30, 1992Aug 23, 1994Osram Sylvania Inc.Seamless wire connector
US7186123Sep 14, 2001Mar 6, 2007Fci Americas Technology, Inc.High density connector and method of manufacture
US7470160 *Jun 6, 2007Dec 30, 2008Tyco Electronics CorporationCard edge cable connector
US7476110Jan 29, 2007Jan 13, 2009Fci Americas Technology, Inc.High density connector and method of manufacture
US8167630Sep 27, 2010May 1, 2012Fci Americas Technology LlcHigh density connector and method of manufacture
US8851933Mar 11, 2013Oct 7, 2014Kerdea Technologies, Inc.Releasable electrical connection
USRE31742 *Mar 28, 1983Nov 20, 1984Allied CorporationUnitary hooded electrical contact
DE2203435A1 *Jan 25, 1972Aug 24, 1972Amp IncElektrisches Verbinderelement fuer gedruckte Schaltungen
EP0562579A1 *Mar 24, 1993Sep 29, 1993The Whitaker CorporationElectrical contact with anti-solder wicking tab
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/851, 439/874
International ClassificationH01R13/115, H01R13/11
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/111
European ClassificationH01R13/11B