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Publication numberUS2387330 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1945
Filing dateMay 18, 1942
Priority dateMay 18, 1942
Publication numberUS 2387330 A, US 2387330A, US-A-2387330, US2387330 A, US2387330A
InventorsJohnson Clarence W, Sterling John G, Wright Milton H, Wright Robert T
Original AssigneeStenographic Machines Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ribbon feeding mechanism for stenographic machines
US 2387330 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 23,l 1945. c. w. JOHNSON Erm. 2,387,330

RIBBON FEEDING MECHANISM FOR STENOGRAPHIC MACHINES Filed May 18, 1942 6 Sheets-Sheet l Illillrllil .0ct. 23, 1945. c. w. JoHNsoN Erm. 2,387,330

RIBBON FEEDING MECHANISM FOR STENOGRAPHIC MACHINES 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 18, 1942 Oct. 23, 1945. c. w. JoHNsoN ETAL 2,387,330

RIBBON FEEDING MECHANISM FOR STENOGRAPHIC MACHINES Filed may 18, 1942 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 Oct. 23, 1945.

c. w. JoHNsoN Erm. 2,387,330

RIBBON FEEDING MECHANISM FOR STENOGRAPHIC MACHINES Filed may 1a, 1942 rs sheets-sheet 4 sa y 91 Oct. 23, 1945. c. w. .JOHNSON Erm. 2,387,3310

RIBBON FEEDING MECHANISM FOR STENOGRAPHIC MACHINES Filed May 18, 1942 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Oct. 23, 1945. c. w. JOHNSON ET Al.

RIBBON FEEDING MECHANISM FOR STENOGRAPHIC MACHINES Filed May 18, 1942 6 Sheets-Sheet G wy @my /Msff CGH/W mame/M ma ,JMfwm N;

Patented Oct. 23, 1945 2.387,3 RIBBON FEEDmG MEcnANrsM Foa sTENo- GRAPHIC moms Clarence Johnson and John G. Sterling, Chi- 1 cago, vand Milton H. Wright and Robert 'l'.

Wright, Lake Bluff. lll., signora to Stenographic nois Machines, Inc., a corporation of Illi- Appumionmy 1s, 1942, serial No. 443,466

This invention relates chines of the type which spoken word. Such machines are used in reporting conferences, court procedure, and the like, and in business oiiices for recording dictation.

The machines now commonly used have certo stenographic ma# is used to record the tain disadvantages which this invention seeks to avoid, and some of the of the invention,'therefore. are as follows: To employ a ribbon mechanism that will provide uniform type impressions on the paper fed through the machine as long as the ribbon fabric remains undamaged and requires little or no attention over long in the ribbon mechanism that is substantially less expensive than the ribbons now commonly used in stencgraphic machines, and one which requires less attention from'the operator; to hold the weight oi' the machine to a minimum by the use of a simpliiled ribbon assembly: and to improve the appearance of the machine by reducing the size of the ribbon assembly to make it possible to reduce the overall size of the machine and otherwise permit streamlining. i

The above constitute some of the principal objects and advantages of the present invention, others of which will become apparent from the drawings and a reading of the following description, in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of the machine fully assembled:

Fig. 2 is an enlarged side elevational view taken from the left-hand side of the machine taken onthe line 2 2 of Fig. 1 with a portion of the front end of the machine broken away;

Fig. 3 is a side elevational view taken on line 3 3 of Fig. 1;

Flg. 4 is an enlarged vertical, longitudinal sectional view through the entire machine taken on line 4 4 of Fig. 1, a portion oi' the front of the machine being broken away:

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of the machine with the casing removed and showing particularly the ribbon, ribbon mechanism, type bars. and the relationship of these parts in the machine;

Fig. 6 is a vertical transverse sectional view through the rear portion of the machine taken on line 8 8 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 7 is a-detail viewl of the universal bar frame, clutch, and ribbon mechanisms;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged vertical sectional view through the ribbon feed pressure roller taken on the line 8 8 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged vertical sectional view through the ribbon guide taken on the line 3 3 of Fig. 5; and

Fig. 10 is an enlarged vertical sectional view through a modified form of the ribbon guide, the view corresponding to Fig. 9.

For the purposeof disclosing the present inmore important objects periods oi' time; to use a ribbon 6 Claims. (Cl. 197-168) vention in compliance with section 4888 of the Revised Statutes, a speciiic embodiment of the invention has bee'n selected, but,obviously, many modifications may be made without departing from the present invention.

'I'his is a continuation-in-part of applicants copending application Ser. No. 309,582, filed December 16, 1939.

GENERAL ORGANIZATION Referring to Fig. 1, the machine forming the subject matter of the present invention has a plurality of keys, generally indicated at 25, operatively connected to type bars 28 acting against a platen 21. Between the type bars 28 and the.

y ed on the machine, and a clutch 30, operatively connected to the keys 25 through suitable mechanism, rotates the platen 21 during a depression stroke of the keys, and at the end of the stroke an impression corresponding to the key being depressed is made on the paper.

As shown in Fig. 1there are 22 keys, 21 of which represent fletters of the alphabet; and, by combinations of these letters, dictation is recorded phonetically. 'I'he twenty-second key, indicated at 3| in Fig. 1, represents an asterisk.

Referring to Fig. 6, the machine comprises, generally, a base 36, a machine frame or chassis 31 supported on the base and secured thereto by machine screws 38, and a casing 39 enclosing the frame and tting over the base. Legs 40 are secured to the underneath face of the: base 36, and screws 4l hold the legs in place and are threaded into lugs 42 formed integrally with the casing 39. The platen 21 and the various other parts making up the machine proper are supported on the chassis 31.

Sracmc DETAILS or :um MACHINE Machine frame or chassis The chassis 31 comprises spaced legs 43 and 44 joined together at the top near the forward end by a relatively heavy horizontal spool supporting member 45 (Fig. 5) and near the other end by a transverse member 18. The dimensions of the various members making up the chassis are kept within extremely close tolerances, and, when assembled, the chassis forms a sturdy frame for the machine.

Key lever assembly Referring to Fig. 1, the keys 25 are secured to the end of levers generally indicated at 46, which are fulcrumed on a key lever shaft 41 journaled in the chassis at 48 and 49 respectively.- Before being installed in themachine, the key levers 43 are mounted onto the shaft 41, and spacers on veach side of each key lever are threaded onto the shaft.

Bell crank and type bar4 assembly The free ends of the key levers 48 terminate in arcuate surfaces I8 (Fig. 4) engaging the arms 'of bell crank levers 88. Referring to Fig. 4. these bell crank levers are mounted on a bell crank shaft 88 journaled in the sides 43 and 44 of the chassis.

Referring to Fig. 4, each bell crank lever has an upwardly extending arm 10 and a substantially horizontal arm 1|, the latter of which has a relatively flat surface 12 for engaging the arcuate surface 58 of the corresponding key lever. At the free end of the upwardly extending arm 10 of each bell crank lever, the type bar 13 is pinned; and, as a key 28 is depressed. rotating the key lever 48 about its axis 41, the cooperating faces 12 and |58 of the bell crank lever and the key lever, respectively. transmit the thrust of the key lever through the bell crank to rotate the upwardly extending arm 10 in a counter-clockwise direction, thereby moving the type bar 13 toward the platen 21.

Referring to Fig. 6. the type bars rest on a cradle 14 having upwardly extending guides 18 between which the type bars 13 move. 'I'he cradle has horizontally extending legs 18 and 11 (Fig. pivotally mounted on a cradle and type bar supporting frame 18 by machine screws 18 and 80 threaded into vertical arms 8|' and 82` projecting upwardly from spaced portions 8| and 82 of frame 18. the heads of the screws serving as trunnions about which the cradle 14 pivots. The frame 18 may be pinned or otherwise properly secured to the sides 43 and 44 of the chassis.

A plate 83 extends across the tops oi the type bars 13. and is screwed to the cradle at 84 and 88. The type bars move back and forth guided by cradle 14 and this plate 83.

Referring to Figs. 4 and 5, upper and lower spring racks 38 and 81 extend between the spaced portions 8| and 82 of the frame 18 and are secured to horizontal arms 8|" and 82" by screws 88. Upwardly extending hooks 80 along the edges of each rack serve as attachment members for springs generally indicated at 8i between the arm of the bell crank levers and the hooks 80 on the spring racks. An integral hook 82 is Y provided on each arm 10 of the bell crank levers for attachment of the springs 8|.l The hooks on adjoining levers are placed with one above the other. and the springs are staggered as shown in Fig. 4 to provide room for all the springs. Upon the return stroke oi' the levers 25. after having been depressed, it is the force of the springs 9| on the upper arms of the bell cranks 10 which returns the type bars 18 to their normal positions, indicated in Fig. 4. By attaching these springs to the vertical arms of the bell cranks, substantially all backlash due to clearance between pivoted joints is taken up by the springs, thereby greatly aiding in maintaining adjustment and reducing noise in the machine. 'I'here is one spring provided for each bell crank lever, making adjustment of the key lever action very simple. It may be desirable to attach these springs directly to the type bars themselves 'ather than to the vertical arms of the bell crank evers.

A plate 84 nts over the top of the spring assembly and includes a downwardly extending aange 3l covering the ends of the springs. This flange is provided with ears 83 for attachment to the spring supporting frame 13. The plaie 34 has downwardly projecting'fianges 333 on opposite sides thereof with ears 33| for engaging the top surface of the arms 3| or 32", as the case may be.

Referring to Fig. 5, the numeral bar 32 is secured to one end of a numeral bar frame comprising a pair of spaced numeral bar levers |33 and |0|, fulcrumed at |32 and |03, respectively, and joined at their free ends by a numeral bar brace |04.

Referring to Figs. 4 and 6, a plate |03 is se cured to the underneath side of the cradle 1,4 and has an outwardly extending flange 88. Between this flange and the far end of the numeral bar lever |00 is attached a link |08, adiustably se cured to the lever |00 in the slot |81. Link |06 is slotted, as shown in Fig. 2, so that a screw driver may be inserted in vone of the slots and twisted to change the length of the link, thereby providing quick and simple adjustment for the link. In this manner, the stroke of the numeral bar is adjusted. On depressing the numeral bar 32, the numeral bar frame pivoting about its fulcrum |02 and |03 raises the cradle 14 through the connecting link |08. By raising this cradle, the type bars swing about their pivot points 33 to bring the lower type 34 on the end of the bars into operative alignment with the platen.

A spring 88 extends between a projection from the lower plate |08 underneath the cradle 14 to a spring clip 81 extending downwardly from a transverse framing member |84 between spaced portions 8| and 82 of frame 18 and integral therewith. This spring is in tension, resiliently holding the cradle 14 in its normal operating position shown in Fig. 4.

Adjustable stop pads |03 and |08 are fastened to the upper surface of the numeral bar brace |04. and they engage the machine chassis to limit the stroke of the numeral bar.

Universal bar assembly Referring to Figs. 2, 3, and 7, a universal bar frame I0 is shown comprising a pair of universal levers and H2, one on each side of the machine, fulcrumed between its ends at H3. Between the forward ends of the levers, a universal bar ||4 extends across the machine and is in the form of an upwardly opening channel member H5 carrying a feit cushion i I8. Between the opposite ends of the universal levers and |i2 is a universal bar brace ||1, also of channel shape, carrying a pair of adjustable pads ||8 (Fig. 4) of felt or other suitable material which engage the machine chassis to limit the stroke of the universal bar. This construction of the universal bar frame makes a very rigid member which improves operating conditions and greatly increases the rigidity of the entire machine. At the rear end of the universal lever ||2 is an upwardly extending projection ||8 having an inclined upper surface |20.

The key levers 46 rest on the universal bar |I4 so that, upon depression of a key 25 (Fig. 8), the universal bar is moved downwardly, pivoting the levers and ||2 about their pivot points |13 to raise the projecting portion ||8 of universal lever ||2.

As is best shown in Figs. 4 and 8, the key levers 48 have a raised portion 300 directly over the universal bar ||4 to elevate the normal position of the universal bar and provide a maximum amount of room between the bar land the base `movementrof the keys and the numeral bar. This ,stop bar `comprises a downwardly opening channel member 231 attached to the forward end of sides 44 and 45 of the chassis by angle members 238 and 239, screwed to the sides by machine screws 239. Screws 240 and 24| secure the lower flanges of the angles 238 and 239, respectively, to the channel member 231 of the stop bar 236. As shown in Fig. 4, a felt block 242 is fastened inside the channel member 231, and the lower surface of this block engages the key levers 46 and the numeral bar levers and I0 I. As shown in Fig. 4, the upper flanges of the angle members 238`and 239 are slotted at 243 so that the stop bar 236 may be moved up and down in this slot to adjust the stroke of the keys and numeral bar. The screws 239', when tightened, ilx the position of the stop bar.

Endless ribbon inkingdevz'ce and ribbon drive bon spool |13. Guide plates |14 and |15 are fastened to the sides of the arms 16 and 11, respectively, by machine screws |16, and these plates have backwardly extending guide arms |11 for guiding the ribbon into the passage between the type bars 13 and the platen. Additional guides |18 and |19 extend outwardly and downwardly from the sides of plate 94 (Figs. 4 and 5). Spaced outwardly from each of the guide members |11 is a vertically extending guard |80 (Figs. 5 and 9) and the ribbon passes between this guard and the guide member |11. A small guide strip |0| extends outwardly from the cradle 14 on each end tting over the spaced guard |80, and serves to prevent'climbing of the ribbon.

A modification of this arrangement is shown in Fig. 10. A U-shaped insert |80 is held by friction within the U-shaped guides formed by the guide plates |14 or |15 and its respective upstanding guard |80. This insert is readily removable, and can be placed on the ribbon and then inserted in its proper place below the guide strip 8| A second modification would involve inverting the U-shaped insert so as to eliminate the use of the guide strip I8 I.

Each of the ribbon guiding devices on the ends of the cradle are identical, so for present purposes one only will be described. Referring to Fig. 9, the guide strip |8| has a tail-piece 324 bending downwardly and made of some suitable spring material, The strip is secured to the cradle 14 by machine screw 85 having a shoulder 325 providing space between the screw head and the cradle, and the screw, when threaded into place, bears against the upper surface of the tailepiece 324 of the strip |8|, tending to straighten the tail-piece, thereby resiliently holding the strip |8| in place on the cradle 14. The guide strip |8| when in place ts in a small recess 326 lo-r cated in the upper end of guard |80.

Referring again to Fig. 5, when it is des1red to replace the ribbon 28, the guide strips |8| are rotated about the screws 84 or 85, as the case may be, to permit raising of the ribbon out of the guard |80 (Fig. 9) and lowering of a new one into place within the U-shaped guard |80. Strips 8| are then returned to their position, shown in Figs. 5 and 9, to cover the gap at the top of guard |80 to prevent the ribbon from climbing.

Referring to Figs 4 and 5, the spool |13 in- 'cludes a top flange |82, a bottom flange |83, and

a core |85, secured to the top and bottom flanges by tongues |89 and |89' extending above and below, respectively, the core |85. Fastened to the bottom flange |83 is a ribbon spool gear |90 spaced below the lower flange |83 along the outer periphery thereof, and having a plurality of spaced slots |92 in the depressed portion |9|.

The spool supporting member 45 has an upwardly extending boss |93 around which the spool |13 fits. Between this boss and the combined lower ilange |83 and spool gear |9| is a collar |94 whose lower edge projects below the lowermost face of the spool gear to serve as the bearing for the spool on the top surface of the member 45. The spool is held in place over the boss |93 by a thumb screw |95 threaded into the top of the boss and having a knurled head to furnish gripping means.

Around the core of the spool between the upper and lower flanges is wrapped a fabric |96 adapted to absorb ink and to impart the ink to 'the ribbon 28 as it comes into contact with the fabric. In the top ange |82 of the spool is a plurality of openings |91 through which ink is fed onto the fabric |96. Thus, the spool |13 serves as an inking well for constantly replenishing the ink supply on the ribbon.

Referring to Figs. 4 and 5, it is to be noted that the underneath portion of spool supporting mem-4 ber 45 has grooves |98 and |99 for receiving a ribbon feed shaft 200 passing the full Width of the machine and journaled in legs 20| and 202 of the spool supporting frame 45 and in sides 43 and 44 of the chassis. Screws 203 and 204 thread into the opposite ends of the shaft 200; and, at one end, between the head of the screw 203 and the chassis, is a washer 205, while at the other end a rubber disk 206 is inserted between the head of the screw 204 and the side 44 of the chassis, having a core 201 forming the center of the disk. This core projects beyond the inner face of the disk 206 to provide a bearing surface 201. Groove |99 is provided with a transverse slot 208 extending entirely through the thickness of the spool supporting member 45. In this slot, mounted on shaft 200, is a driving pinion 209 secured to the shaft by a machine screw 2|0. This pinion is directly below the slots |92 in the ribbon spool gear |90; and, as shown in Fig. 5, the teeth 2|| of the pinion 209 project into these slots |92. The spacing of the teeth on the pinion 209 corresponds to the spacing of the slots |92 around the ribbon spool gear; and, on rotating the pinion, the spool |12 is rotated about the boss |93.

Referring to Fig. 2, extending upwardly from the universal lever is an arm 2|2 projecting over the top of the rubber disk 206 having on its free end a downwardly extending driving pawl 2|3 pivoted to the arm 2|2 at 2|4. A spring 2|5 rests against the back of the driving pawl 2|3 urging the lower curved edge of the pawl against the rubber disk 206. On the outer face of the curved portion of the driving pawl is a friction surface 2|6 engaging the rubber disk. On the other side of the disk 206 is a. drag pawl 2I1 curved at its lower end 2 I8 and having a roughened surface 2I9 engaging the rubber disk 206, and the pawl is pivotally secured to the side 44 of the chassis by the screw 220. A spring 22| engages the upper end of the drag pawl 2I1, forcing the pawl against the disk 206.

As the universal bar frame II4 pivots in a clockwise direction about its axis II3 in response to depressing a key 25, the upwardly extending arm 2I2 rotates about the axis II3 in a clockwise direction to move the pawl 2 I3 downwardly, applying a torque to the disk 206 through the roughened surface 2I6 of the pawl. During this motion of the disk 206, the drag pawl 2I1 is moved upwardly to release the friction between the roughened surface 2I9 and the rubber disk 206 to permit turning of the disk. Upon the return stroke of the key 25, the universal bar frame H4 returns in a counter-clockwise direction to its former position, moving the arm 2l2 and driv- Aing pawl 2| 3 in a counter-clockwise direction.

While traveling in this direction, the pawl pivots about its axis 2I4 to release the gripping action between the roughened surface 2 I6 and the disk 206, thereby dragging the pawl over theperipheral surface of the disk, and at the same time the frictionvbetween the roughened surface 2I9 of the drag pawl 2 I1 and the disk 206 rotates the drag pawl in a clockwise direction about its pivot point 220 to increase the frictional resistance of the drag pawl on the disk, thereby locking the disk and preventing counter-clockwise direction thereof.

'I'he disk 206 is mounted on the ribbon spool shaft 200 with flattened sides of the shaft engaging complementary flattened sides of the core 201 to make a positive drive between the disk and the ribbon feed shaft. Thus, it is seen that, upon depressing a key 25, the disk 206 drives the ribbon feed shaft in a clockwise direction; and, upon the return stroke of the key, holding pawl 2 I 1 prevents rotation of the shaft in the counterclockwise direction.

As previously pointed out, the pinion 209 fixed to the shaft 200 drives the ribbon spool I13 so that, as the disk 206 drives the shaft 200, the ribbon spool I13 is rotated in a clockwise direction.

Referring to Fig. 5, a pair of ribbon pressure rolls 222 and 223 force the ribbon 28 against the fabric on the ribbon spool I13 to provide a drive for the ribbon and to aid in the inking operation. A relatively narrow spool contacting surface 340 is embossed on the periphery of the rollers 222 and 223, as best shown in Fig. 8, to concentrate the pressure on the ribbon against the spool in the center portion of the ribbon. This concentrated pressure assures proper inking of the ribbon in the region where the type strikes. Each of these pressure rollers 222 and 223 is mounted in a ribbon roll bracket 224 comprising upper and lower flanges 225 and 226, respectively, (Fig. 8) with a connecting web 221. The bracket is pivotally mounted on the spool supporting member 45 at 228, and the roller 222 or 223, as the case may be,- is rotatably mounted at the free end of the bracket, as indicated at 229.

Referring to Fig. 8, a lift pin 230 secures the roller 222 or 223 to its corresponding bracket; and, when the roller is in its operative position against the ribbon 28 around the spool |31, the pin is lifted, as shown in Fig. 8, with its lower edge resting on the top surface 23I of the supporting member 45. When it is desired to remove the ribbon 23 from the machine or perhaps lift the spool I13 away from the machine, the bracket 224 is rotated about its pivot point 228 away from the ribbon spool I13 until the pin 230 drops into a recess 232 in the supporting member, in which case the pin drops until the shoulder of the head 233 comes in contact with the top flange 225 of the bracket. When it is again desired to place the pressure roller 222 or 223 against the ribbon spool I13, the pin 230 is lifted by grasping the head 233 and raising the pin until the shoulder 234 engages the lower surface of the top flange 225 of the bracket, raising the pin out of slot 232 to permit rotation of the bracket to the operative position of the roller.

The pin 230 is flattened at diametrically opposite sides adjacent to the top thereof, as indicated at 332, and the opening in the top flange 225 of bracket 224, through which the pin passes, has corresponding straight edges cooperating with the flattened sides 350 to prevent turning of the pin.

A spring 235 acts on the bracket 224 to hold resiliently the roller 222 or 223, as the case may be, against the spool I13.

The use of the continuous ribbon lessens the cost of operation of the machine, because its initial cost is less than the reversible ribbon normally used, and its life is considerably longer. The inking well in the spool I13 constantly' refreshes the ink supply on the ribbon, thereby always assuring uniformly clear impressions on the paper.

The endless ribbon may be folded to accommodate a very small space to facilitate carrying in the machine case. Since it is used in conjunction with an inking well, it may be procured dry and free from ink and installed on the machine in that condition. If desired, the ribbon may be partially or fully inked before installing. After installation. the ribbon mechanism may be turned by hand a few times to ink the ribbon.

It is common practice in machines of this type to lemploy a length of ribbon operating between two spools with a reversing mechanism. Considerable vertical space is required for the operation of this mechanism. By using the endless ribbon, a considerable reduction in machine height may be effected.

It is to be noted that the ribbon spool I13 is relatively large in diameter in proportion to the over-all width of 'the type carried by the type bars 26, and for purposes of simplicity this width may be referred to as the width of the line of type. This large size for the ribbon spool |13 allows the ribbon to remain in contact with the peripheral surface of the spool for a relatively long time, even during high speed operation of the machine. Proper inking of the ribbon is thereby insured, and, in addition to this, adequate traction between the ribbon and the spool is provided so as to allow the spool to move the ribbon across the faces of the type at a-suificient rate to insure heavy and well defined ink impressions on the paper. As shown, the spool I13 has a diameter corre sponding to somewhat in excess of half the width of the line of type.

The spool I13, as shown, is disposed entirely within the horizontal projection of the line of type, and in fact is on the perpendicular bisector thereof. This makes it possible to provide avery compact and simple ribbon assembly and allows the over-al1 size of the machine to be reduced below that required with previously known arrangements.

The simplicity and compactness of the ribbon mechanism is insured without detracting from the emciency of the machine. The relatively large traction surface, as well as the relative disposition of the various parts of this mechanism, effects a soft operating touch that is an advantage particularly to high speed operation of the machine.

Machine frame or chassis The machine frame or chassis is made up oi four main parts, including the two sides 43 and 44, joined together at the front by the spool supporting member 45 and at the back by frame 18, pinned and screwed in place as indicated at 244 (Fig. Across the back of the chassis connecting the sides is the substantial transverse member |84 (Fig. 4), also pinned and screwed in place. The chassis so constructed is extremely accurate in its dimensions between the side members, and is sturdy, so that there is no relative movement between the framing members tending to throw the machine out of adjustment. 'I'he stop bar 23B gives further rigidity to the forwardmost portion of the frame.

Machine casing Referring to Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6, the casing 39 includes a pair of sides 249 and 250 having vertical portions 25| and 252, respectively, at the back and upper part of the machine, with outwardly bulging portions 253 and 254, respectively, curving from a point at the back of the machine (Fig. l) to beneath the lower bank 255 of the keys, and a front side 258 curving forwardly from the terminating points of the sides to an apex directly below and in front of the four vowel keys indicated at 251.

As best shown in Figs. 2, 3, and 4, a substantially horizontal top 258 connects the upper vertical portions 25| and 252 of the sides and extends from the back of the machine to a point immediately .to the rear of the numeral bar 32. A vertical partition 259 extends from this forward portion of the top 258 down behind the numeral bar.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 2. a removable plate 268, whose upper surface is flush with the upper surface of the top 258 of the machine, fits into an opening 25| (Fig. 6) to finish oi the top of the machine. This plate rests along its forward edge on a pair of lugs 261 and 268 extending outwardly from the casing. On each side of the plate near the rear thereof is a pin 265 backed by a spring 335. A lug 253 extends downwardly from the casing and has a recess into which the end of pin 265 enters to hold the cover plate in place.

The plate 250, being flat and substantially flush with the top of the machine, serves as a small nat area upon which the paper feeding off the platen may be folded back for making pencil notations thereon. Upon removal of this plate 260, the ribbon and ribbon mechanism together with the type bars and their supporting plate are made accessible for cleaning and repairs.

We claim:

1. In a stenographic machine of the class described having a machine chassis, a platen rotatably mounted on the chassis, a plurality of type bars operating against the platen, and an inked ribbon passing between the type bars and the platen, a substantially U-shaped guide for guiding the ribbon. a substantially U-shaped insert adapted to receive the ribbon and removably Cil held in the guide, and a removable cover member closing the opening at the top of the U.

2. In a stenographic machine of the class described having a machine chassis, a platen rotatably mounted on the chassis, a plurality of type bars operating against the platen, and an inked ribbon feeding between the type bars and platen, a substantially U-shaped guide for guiding the ribbon, and a substantially U-shaped insert adapted to receive the ribbon and removably held by the guide.

3. In a stenographic machine of the class described having la machine chassis, a platen rotatably mounted on the chassis, a plurality of type bars operating against 4the platen, and an inking ribbon passing between the type bars and the platen, a substantially U-shaped guide for guiding the ribbon, and a removable member cooperating with the guide to hold the ribbon in the guide, said removable member comprising a U- shaped insert adapted to be removably held by the guide and further adapted to straddle the ribbon.

4. In a stenographic machine of the class described, a plurality of type arranged horizontally in a straight line, a ribbon guide disposed adiacent to each end of the line of type, a horizon- 1tally disposed ribbon drum spaced horizontally with respect to the type and lying with its center substantially on the perpendicular bisector of the line of type and adapted to rotate about a vertical axis, the diameter of the drum corresponding at least to half the length of the line of type, an endless ribbon disposed acrossthe face of the type, Varound the guides and over the periphery of the ribbon drum, means feeding ink to the periphery of the ribbon drum, and means imparting rotary motion to the ribbon drum so as to feed the ribbon over the type.

5. In a stenographic machine of the class described, a plurality of type arranged horizontally in a straight line, a ribbon guide disposed adjacent to each end of the line of type, a horizontally disposed ribbon drum spaced horizontally with respect to the type and lying within the horizontal projection of the ends of the line of type and adapted to rotate about a vertical axis, the diameter of the drum being greater than half the length of the line of type, an endless ribbon disposed across the face of the type, around the guides and over the periphery of the ribbon drum, means feeding ink to the periphery of the ribbon drum, and means imparting rotary motion to the ribbon drum so as to feed the ribbon over the type.

6. In a stenographic machine of the class described, a plurality of type arranged horizontally in a straight line, a ribbon guide disposed adjacent to each end of the line of type, a horizontally disposed ribbon drum spaced horizontally with respect t0 the type and lying with its center substantially on the perpendicular bisector of the line of type and adapted to rotate about a vertical axis, the diameter of the drum being greater than half the length of the line of type. an endless ribbon disposed across the face of the type, around the guides and over the periphery of the ribbon drum, means feeding ink to the periphery of the ribbon drum, and means imparting rotary motion to the ribbon drum so as to feed the ribbon over the type.

CLARENCE W; JOHNSON. JOHN G. STERLING. I MILTON H. WRIGHT.

ROBERT T. WRIGHT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2508780 *May 13, 1947May 23, 1950New Dictatype Company IncTypewriter ribbon mechanism
US2761539 *Dec 29, 1954Sep 4, 1956IbmRe-inking ribbon spool
US3050172 *Jun 24, 1959Aug 21, 1962Lundeberg Edgar CTypewriter ribbon device
US4289413 *Jan 19, 1979Sep 15, 1981Stanley SeplinCartridge and ribbon for use with a single spool stenotype machine
US4415283 *Jul 27, 1982Nov 15, 1983Baron Data SystemsShorthand machine having active tactile feedback
US4469456 *Sep 25, 1981Sep 4, 1984Fitzgerald H DianeDisposable ribbon carrier for a stenograph reporting machine
US5493654 *Aug 9, 1994Feb 20, 1996Infogrip, Inc.Chordic keyboard system for generating a signal in response to a chord that is assigned using a correlation based on a composite chord-difficulty index
US5576706 *Feb 3, 1994Nov 19, 1996Infogrip, Inc.Methods and apparatus for using multiple keyboards connected in a daisy chain to a keyboard port of a computer
US5642108 *Dec 29, 1994Jun 24, 1997Infogrip, Inc.In a data processing apparatus
DE869491C *Nov 23, 1950Mar 5, 1953Robert KoreskaFarbbandeinrichtung fuer Schreibmaschinen
Classifications
U.S. Classification400/92, 400/202, 400/194
International ClassificationB41J11/62, B41J11/00, B41J3/00, B41J3/26
Cooperative ClassificationB41J11/62, B41J3/26
European ClassificationB41J3/26, B41J11/62