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Publication numberUS2387779 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1945
Filing dateApr 12, 1941
Priority dateApr 12, 1941
Publication numberUS 2387779 A, US 2387779A, US-A-2387779, US2387779 A, US2387779A
InventorsStrauss Ray C
Original AssigneeStrauss Ray C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carrier unit
US 2387779 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 30 1945. R. c. STRAUSS 2,387,779

CARRIER UNIT Filed April 12 1941 7 Sheets-Sheet l 32 5 INVENTOR. y U

ATTORNEY.

0d. 30, 1945. C STRAUSS 2,387,779

CARRIER UNIT Filed April 12, 1941 '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 :4 52 fa C. Sins/216s INVENTOR. ATTEST- 9/5 6.411% BY ,iz s,

ATTORNEY.

Oct. 30, 1945. R R. c. STRAUSS 2,387,779

' CARRIER UNIT Filed April 12, 1941 7 Sheets-Sheet s Pay 6. ,Szrazzss INVENTOR.

Armsrv BY 44 Jan C W ATTORNEY.

Oct 30, 1945. R Q s' uss 2,387,779

CARRIER UNIT Filed April 12, 1941 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 REY C Jzrazzss @UZINVENTOR.

ATTORNEY.

Oct. 30, 1945.

R. C STRAUSS CARRIER UNIT Filed April 12, 1941 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 fay 15 frazzss x2712 ENTOR.

ATTzsT- ATTORNEY.

Oct. 30, 1945. R. c. STRAUSS CARRIER UNIT Filed April 12, 1941 7 Sheets-Sheet 8 Kay (1 Jzrazzss 1N VENTOR.

ATTEST- Get. 30, 1945. R. c. STRAUSS CARRIER UNIT 7 Sheets-Sfiet 7 Filed April 12, 1941 Pay C. 52922 ass XZ7UZINVENTORZ ATTORNEY.

Patented Oct. 30, 1945 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CARRIER UNIT Ray C. Strauss, Madison, Wis. Application April 12, 1941, Serial No. 388,293

2 Claims. 21. 224-29) This invention relates to luggage or parcel carriers adapted to be removably mounted on the roof of vehicles, such as automobiles and the like.

With the use of the all-steel roof construction in present day motor vehicles, I have found that it is feasible to removably mount a luggage carrier on the roof of such vehicles. The carrier may be rigid, but preferably is collapsible and maypresent a continuous or a discontinuous load hearing surface. The collapsible carrier may be removed from the vehicle roof and folded or collapsed into a relatively small space and stowed in a small space in the vehicle when not in use.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a carrier unit which may be removably mounted or secured on a vehicle roof and which distributes the weight ofthe luggage or other articles over alrelatively large area of the vehicle roof.

Anotherobject of this invention is to provide a carrier which'may be easily and quickly mounted or removed from the vehicle roof.

Another object of this invention is to provide a carrier which may be removably mounted on the vehicle roof without marring the roof, or without permanent fastening means on the roof or vehicle body, or without permanently fastening the unit to the roof or other portions of thevehicle.

A further objectof this invention is to provide means whereby the carrier maybe secured to the roofs of vehicles of various Widths and curvatures. I Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the-detailed descriptlon and the claims which follow which are to be considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein;

Fig.1 is a perspective view of a carrier made in accordance with my invention mounted removably on a vehicle roof.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view, at an enlarged scale, of the draw-up means for securing the carrier to the vehicle roof.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the carrier of Fig. 1, illustrating the unit in collapsed position.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of one end of a carrier unit illustrating a modified form of connecting means between the pontoons forming the carrier.

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of another modification of a carrier made in accordance with my invention.

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the carrier unit of Fig. 5 illustrating the unit in collapsed position.

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a further form of carrier unit made in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view, at an enlarged scale, of one form of bracket adapted to secure the carrier to the vehicle roof.

Figs. 9 and 10 are perspective views of further forms of carriers or grid racks made in accordance with this invention.

Fig. 11 is a perspective view of a carrier unit in which the pontoons extend transversely of the vehicle roof.

Fig. 12 is a perspective view, at an enlarged scale, of one end of a pontoon of the carrier unit illustrated in Fig. 11. I

Fig. 13 is a perspective view of another modification of the carrier unit in which the pontoons extend transversely of the vehicle roof.

Fig. 14 is an end view of one of the pontoons of the carrier unit of Fig. 13.

Fig. 15 is a perspective view of the carrier unit of Fig. 13 illustrating the unit in collapsed 'position.

Fig. 16 is a perspective view of a further embodiment of the carrier unit of this invention wherein a continuous load bearing surface is illustrated. I

Fig. 1'7 isa perspective view of the carrier unit of Fig. 16 illustrating the unit in collapsed position.

Figs. 18 and 19 are perspective views of further forms of carrier units. made in accordance with my invention.

It is Well known that it is not possible to place parcels or luggage of substantial weight directly upon the vehicle roof. I If such attempt is made, 'the weight of the luggage, unless it is extremely light in weight, will depress the roof, and may permanently dent the roof. Although the weight may not be sufficient to dent the roof, the article may be of such nature and construction that it would permanently mar the surface. I have discovered that if the weight is distributed .over a substantial area of the vehicle roof, articles of considerable weight may be placed on the roof without denting or permanently injuring the sur- I to the roof. and supported by the roof. The ribs or other load bearing surfaces or members are preferably connected together to form a collapsible unit or may be more or less permanently joined, as will be described more fully hereinafter. It is apparent that the unit may be provided with a closure or cover member so as to afford protection to the luggage or other articles in inclement weather, and to protect the articles from the elements, if desired. The unit is provided with brackets which are adapted to grip the eaves or sills or edge portions of the vehicle roof whereby the unit is securely mountedremovably on the roof. The brackets may be provided with means for adjustment to accommodate roofs of various widths, within certain limits.

The construction illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 comprises a collapsible carrier unit or grid rack which may be folded into a relatively small space, as clearly illustrated in Fig. 3. In Fig. 1, the carrier unit is shown mounted removably upon the roof I of a motor vehicle. The carrier comprises a collapsible unit 2 and a plurality of brackets 3. The brackets 3 may be constructed of band or strip steel, or web or other more or less flexible straps, and are more or less flexible.

The brackets are preferably arcuate as illustrated more clearly in Fig. 3. The brackets terminate in hook-like extremities 4 which are adapted to grip the sill 5 of roof I. The tie member or intermediate portion of the bracket may be formed in two sections, as illustrated, the adjacent or overlapping portions being provided with cooperating apertures 6 which permit rough adjustment of the unit for various widths of roofs. The two sections are connected by bolts 6a which may, if desired be provided with wing nuts. The opposite extremity of the bracket is pivotally secured to an angle member i by satisfactory means such as a rivet 8 or bolt. In order to prevent marrin of the surface of the roof, a satisfactory resilient or elastic material 9, such as rubber or cork, may be secured to the lower surface of the bracket. The angle member I is in turn secured to the longitudinal terminal pontoon Ill by means of a bolt II. The bolt permits the carrier to be drawn tightly across the roof, thereby retaining the carrier on the roof. The brackets serve to tensionally secure the connected pontoons between the sills of the roof.

The collapsible unit or grid rack 2 comprises longitudinal end sections [2 and I3 which may be identical in construction. The end section l2 comprises a longitudinal pontoon ID in the form of a slat having corner blocks I4 and I5 rigidly secured to the slat adjacent its ends. A bar It is rigidly secured to the upper ends of corner blocks l4 and IS. A plurality of struts I1 are secured to slat l and bar is to rigidify the end section.

' tour of the roof.

A tongue it having a slot I8 is secured to corner,

I4 and projects transversely from the block. An angle member 20 is rigidly secured to 'corner block l and projects transversely therefrom. .A transverse bar 2! is mounted pivotally on angle member and is adapted to be pivoted'into a. position substantially parallel to ion- Situdinal bar l5 when the carrier is removed from the vehicle roof and collapsed. The free end of transverse bar 2| is provided with a thumb screw 22 which is adapted to cooperate with the slotted tongue ll of the laterally opposite corner block to securely fasten the free end of bar 2| to the tongue.

A plurality of spaced pontoons in the form of block slats 23 and 24 are connected by pivotally mounted links 25 and. 26 and span the space betwe n links 25 are pivotally secured to end pontoons It! at one end and to pontoons 23 at the other end. Links 26 are secured pivotally to pontoons 23 at one end and to pontoons 24 at the other end. The lower surface of pontoons I0, 23, and 24 is preferably provided with elastic or resilient material 21, such as felt, cork or rubber to prevent marring of the surface of the roof. Pontoons I0, 23 and 24 are preferably curved so as to conform to the longitudinal con- Transverse bars 2| may be curved so as to conform approximately to the transverse contour of the roof.

In mounting the carrier unit on the roof, the collapsible unit is extended or opened and placed upon the roof. The hook-like extremities 4 of the brackets 3 are placed over the sills or eaves 5 of the roof and the bolts ll of the brackets are drawn tight. The carrier is thereby secured to the vehicle roof and will support considerable weight without denting or marring the surface of the roof.

In removing the carrier or rack from the roof. the bolts H of the brackets are loosened and the hook-like extremities 4 are removed from the sills or eaves of the roof. Upon loosening the bolts I l, angle members 1 may be pivoted, and the brackets may be swun into a position substantially parallel to the pontoons, as illustrated in Fig. 3. The carrier unit is then removed from the roof and transverse bars 2| are pivoted into a position substantially parallel to longitudinal bars,l8. The unit may then be collapsed or folded. As illustrated in Fig. 3, the pontoons 23 are folded into positions adjacent longitudinal bar l6, while pontoons 24 remain adjacent to and in the plane of the end pontoon or slat I0. As is apparent from Fig. 3, the two links adjacent the end sections may be shorter than the intermediate links to permit the pontoons or slats adjacent the end sections to be collapsed under the longitudinal bars and transverse bars. In the collapsed condition, the carrier may be stored in a small space.

It is to be understood that the end sections and pontoons may be constructed of wood or metal, as desired. In the embodiment illustrated, the pontoons are supported on the roof by a continuous surface contact with the roof along the length of the pontoons. The transverse bars and links are preferably formed of metal.

In Fig. 4, I have illustrated a modified form of collapsible carrier unit. The longitudinal end sections 30 and transverse bars II may be identical to the corresponding elements illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. This modification dimers in the connecting or linkage system connecting the end sections and the intermediate spaced pontoons. The linkage system comprises cross links or a pantograph linkage consisting of links 32 and 22 joined pivotally at their centers 34 and at their upper ends 35 and at their lower ends 38 and to the pontoons 31. The free ends of the cross links are provided with slots 24 and 29 and are secured pivotally to the corner blocks 40. Thumb screw 4| may be provided-between corner block 40 and the cross linkage to permit adjustment or limitation of the action of the linkage.

In Figs. 5 and 6, I have illustrated a modification of the carrier unit or grid rack which is particularly adapted to steel or metal fabrication. The unit may be collapsed readily into a relatively small space for storage purposes. The load bearing surface is supported upon the roof by means of depending edges, the edges distributing end slats lo. The

the weight of the luggage over a substantial portion of the roof area;

In Fig. 5, the carrier unit is shown mounted removably upon the roof 4! of a motor vehicle. The carrier unit comprises a series of spaced, connected pontoons 42 provided with an upwardly extending railing 43 and means comprising brackets 44 for removably mounting the pontoons on the vehicle roof and t'ensionally securing the pontoons between the sills of the roof. The brackets 44 are similar in construction to brackets 3 described hereinbefore. The brackets 44 are secured pivotally to an angle member 45 which is in turn secured to pontoon 42 by means of bolts 45. The bolts permit the pontoons to be drawn tightly across the roof and thereby retain the unit on the roof. The brackets are preferably covered with rubber, felt, cork or other material to prevent marring the surface of the roof.

The pontoons 42 comprise pan having depending longitudinally extendin skirts 41 and depending transversely extending skirts or ends 48. The pans may be formed in any desired manner, and it is apparent that this construction is adaptable to a drawing operation. The curvature of the longitudinal skirts may be formed by any desired manner, corrugation of the skirts has been found convenient and practical. The pontoons may be formed with an over-arc or a greater curvature than the curvature of the vehicle roof. Upon mounting the unit on the vehicle roof and placing a load on the pontoons, the pontoons will be pressed in-to conformity With the curvature of the roof and the depending longitudinal skirts will contact the roof along their 1 lengths. For illustrative purposes, the longitudinal skirts are shown deeper than the lateral skirts 48, however, the lateral skirts or ends may be of the same depth as the longitudinal skirts. Rubber channels 49 or channels of felt, cork or like materials are secured to the longitudinal skirts, and, if desired, to the lateral skirts, to prevent marring of the surface of the roof. The adjacent pontoons are joined by links 50 which are secured pivotally to the transverse skirts or ends 48 as by means of rivets or bolts.

The railing comprises corner posts 5| and 52 and a longitudinal bar 53 which is rigidly secured to the corner posts, as by welding. A hinge plate 54 is secured to the lower end of each of the corner posts, as by welding. The hinge plates 54 are secured pivotally to transverse sk'rrts or ends 48 of the outer or terminal pontoons 42. A transverse bar 55 is secured pivotally to the upper end of corner posts 5|, as by means of rivet 56. The free end of transverse bar 55 is provided with a longitudinally extending slot 51. A thumb bolt 58 is provided in posts 52 which are adapted to cooperate with slots 51 and secure the free ends of the transverse bars 55 to posts 52. In the collapsed condition, the transverse bars 55 may be pivoted so as to lie adjacent longitudinal bars 53. The railing may be conveniently formed from angle iron, as illustrated. The depending sides of the bars may be curved slightly, if desired, to render the bar arcuate to conform more or less to the contour of the roof.

In mounting the carrier unit on the vehicle roof, the 'unit is opened or extended. Transverse bars, 55 are pivoted from their longitudinal posi tions into transverse positions. Thumb bolts 58 are drawn tight to secure the free ends of transverse bars 55 to corner posts 52. The unit i then placed 0n the vehicle roof. The hook-like extremities of brackets 44 are placed over the ills of the roof. The bolts 48 are drawn tight to secure the carrier on the roof. The carrier unit will support considerable weight without denting or marring the surface "of the roof.

In removing the unit from the roof, bolts 45 are loosened and the hook-like extremities of the brackets removed from the sills of the roof.

The brackets may be pivoted into a position substantially parallel to skirt 4! of pontoon 42, and the angle members 45 may be pivoted to bring the bracket into the position illustrated in Fig.

6. The unit may then be removed from the roof.

Thumb bolts 58 are loosened and transverse bars 55 may be pivoted under the longitudinal bars 53. In collapsing the unit, the pontoons may be stacked one upon the other, and one side rail pivoted so that it will rest upon the top pontoon, as clearly illustrated in Fig. 6. In the collapsed position, the unit occupies a relatively small space.

In Fig. 7, I have illustrated a further modifica tion of the carrier unit. In this modification, the pontoons comprise load bearing surfaces or platforms 5| which are spaced from the surface of the roof 62 by depending longitudinal angle members 63 and 84 which may be integral with the load bearing surface or may be secured thereto, as by welding. The lower surface of the angle members may be provided with a covering of rubber. cork, or the like material to prevent marring of the surface of the roof. The pontoons are connected by means of links 65 to provide some flexibility between the pontoons so that the unit may be adapted for use on roof having various contours. The unit is provided with upstandin corner members or posts 66 which may be formed from angle iron and may be secured to the pontoons as by means of welding. The upper ends of longitudinally adjacent corner members 66 are connected by a longitudinal bar 51 secured to the members by rivets, bolts or Welding The carrier unit is secured removably to the vehicle roof 62 by means of supporting members 68 and 89. The supporting members illustrate various bracket constructions which may be em ployed to secure the carrier to the roof. The supporting members may be mounted removably on the vehicle roof by means of brackets 12, 13, I4 and 15.

Supporting member 68 comprises a tubular transverse bar .10 secured to corner posts 56 by means of bands H; The tubular bar comprises telescoping tubular members 18 and 11, each of which has its end portion turned downwardly at substantially right angles, as illustrated at 18 and 19, respectively. The opposite end of tubular member 16 is fitted with a threaded plug 80. Tubular member 1! is provided with an outwardly projecting sleeve 8|. A threaded stem 82 having a thumb screw head 83a passes through sleeve 8! and is threaded into plug 80.

Bracket I2 comprises a hollow head 84 adapted to receive the depending end 79 of tubular member 11. The head 84 is reenforced by an arcuate plate or tubular element 83 which may be secured to longitudinal bearing plate 85 and tie member 86. Bearing plate 85 serves to distribute any weight which may be placed on the supporting member. Tie member 86 may be more or less flexible and is arcuate to permit the tie member to conform to the contour of the shoulder of the roof. Tie member 86 terminates in a hook-like element or member 81 which is adapted to grip the sill or eave of the roof. To further strengthen the bracket and prevent marring of the surface of the roof, the arcuate plate 84, bearing plate 85 and the base of the tie member 86 are molded in rubber 88. The intermediate portion of tie member 86 may be provided with a covering of rubber or cork, if desired. The depending end I9 of tubular member I'! may be secured to the bracket by means of a bolt 89.

A similar bracket may be secured to the deending end 18 of tubular member I6. The supporting member is secured to the vehicle roof by placing the hook-like members 81 of the brackets under the sills or eaves of the roof and drawing up threaded stem 82 until the hook-like members of both brackets grip the opposite sills,

Bracket 73 comprises a longitudinal bearing plate 90 and an upwardly projecting yoke. The yoke consists of a split tubular element 9| and a bifurcated portion 92, the leg portions being se cured to bearing plate 90 as by welding. A tie member 93 passes through the bifurcated portion of the'yoke. the outer end of the tie member terminating in a hook-like member 94, while the inner end terminates in an upwardly projecting lug 95 havin a threaded opening therein. A threaded stem 96 is threaded in the opening in lug 95 and passes through an opening in yoke 9|. Tie member 93 is preferably more or less flexible so that on drawing up the stem 96 or the stem 82, the tie member will conform more or less to the contour of the shoulder of the roof. Bearing plate 90 and tie member 93 may be provided with a covering of rubber or the like to prevent marring of the surface of the roof.

A similar bracket may be secured to the depending end I9 of tubular member TI. The supporting member is secured to the vehicle roof by placing the hook-like members 94 of the brackets under the sills or caves of the roof and drawing up threaded stem 96 until the hook-like members of both brackets grip the opposite sills or eaves.

Supporting member 89 comprises a tubular transverse bar 91 secured to the rear corner posts 66 by means of bands 98. The tubular bar comprises telescoping members I and IOI which may be of a construction similar to the telescoping members of bar ID. The end portion of member I00 is turned downwardly at, substantially right angles at I02.

Bracket It is similar to bracket '12. having a longitudinal bearing plate and an arcuate upstandin plate or tubular member which are preferably molded in rubber. The tie member comprises a liook like member M3 adapted to grip the sill or eave of the roof and a threaded bar I 04 having one end bent at substantially rightangles, as at I05. The bracket is provided with an aperture adapted to receive the bent and I05 of the threaded bar I04.

As is apparent, a similar bracket may be secured to the opposite end of the tubular bar. The supporting member is secured to the vehicle roof by placin the hooklike member I03 of the brackets under the eaves or sills of the roof and drawine u': the threaded bars I04 until the booklike mem rs of both brackets grip the opposite eaves or sills.

The end portion of telescoping member IOI is provided with a series of indents or cut-out sections I06 which cooperate with bracket I5.

Bracket I5 comprises a longitudinal bearing plate IIl'I, an upwardly extending stirrup I08 and a tie member I09. the tie member terminating in a hook-like member H0. The upper end of the stirrup I08 passes over tubular member IOI. A dog III is mounted pivotally in the stirrup and is provided with a threaded bolt II2 which is adapted to cooperate with the indents I06 in the tubular member IM to secure the tubular member to the stirrup and bracket.

Plates 0r angle members II3 may be secured to supporting members 68 and G9. The plates may be spaced to provide means for supporting a boat, a canoe, or other articles. With this construction, the unit serves efiiciently as a combination luggage carrier and boat carrier.

It is apparent that the supporting members 68 and 69 may be used to support relatively long articles such as skiis, ladders, and the like. If desired for such purposes, the pontoons may be dispensed with. The ladder or other relatively long articles is lashed to the supporting members.

The carrier unit of Fig. 9 is provided with two pontoons comprising load bearing surfaces or platforms I I4 provided with depending longitudinal angle members H5 and H6, which may be provided with rubber, cork or like material on their under surface to prevent marring of the surface of the roof. The pontoons are connected or joined by links H! to provide some flexibility.

between the pontoons so that the unit may be adapted for mounting and use on roofs having various contours. The unit is provided with a railing comprising corner posts I I 8 which may be secured to the corners of the pontoons by suitable means such as welding. Longitudinal bars H9 and transverse bars I20 are secured to the upper ends of corner posts IIB, as by means of bolts which are threaded into the corner posts. The bars may be formed from tubul r metal, if desired.

The pontoons may be secured to the vehicle roof by brackets of various constructions. as clearly illustrated in the drawings. The bracket I2I comprises a tie member I22 having a hooklike extremity I23 adapted to grip the sill of the roof. The opposite end of the tie member I22 is turned upwardly to form 2. lug I24. The upwardly extending lug I24 is provided with a threaded aperture adapted to receive thumb screw I25. The tie member extends through a slot in angle member H6. The thumb screw is journalled in an aperture in angle member H6. A similar bracket may be secured to the opposite side of the unit. The unit is mounted upon the vehicle roof by placing the hook-like members I23 under the sills of the roof and drawing up thumb screws I25 until the hook-like members grip the opposite sills of the roof.

The bracket I26 comprises a tongue I21 having a fold I20. a tie member I29 terminating at one end in a hook member I30 and at the other end in an upwardly turned lug I3I, and a threaded stem I32. Tongue I21 may be rigidly secured to angle member III; of pontoon H4. as by welding, riveting or other suitable means. The fold I28 is provided with threaded apertures adapted to receive the threaded stem I32. The threaded stem passes through an aperture in lug I3I.

A similar bracket may be secured to the opposite side of the unit. The unit is secured to the vehicle roof by placing the hook-like members I30 under the sills or eaves of the roof and drawing up the threaded stems until the hook-like member grip the opposite sills or eaves of the roof.

The bracket I33 comprises a hook-like member I34 and a strap I35 provided with a buckle I36. The strap may be secured to angle member IIS and passes through a suitable slot in the hook-like member I34. The unit is secured spaced pontoons I56 to the vehicle roof by drawing up the strap I35 and locking the strap in the buckle I36.

The bracket I31 comprises a tie member I38 terminating at one end in a hook-like member I39 and at the other end in an upwardly turned lug I40. A threaded stem MI is secured to angle member H6 and extends through an aperture in lug I40, the opposite end of the stem being provided with a thumb or wing nut MI. The unit is secured to the vehicle roof by drawing up thumb nut I'4I until the hook-like members grip the opposite sills of the roof.

If desired, a strap I42 provided with a buckle I43 and hook member I44 may be secured to the opposite sides of the railing, only one being shown in the drawings. Hook member I44 is adapted to grip the sill or cave of the roof. After the carrier unit is mounted and secured to the vehicle roof, the hook members I44 are placed over the opposite sills or eaves and the straps drawn tight and locked in the buckles to stabilize the railing. Plates or angle members 99 may be secured to bars I20 to provide means for supporting a boat or other articles. The carrier unit thereby serves as a combination lugg e carrier and boat carrier.

In Fig. 10, there is illustrated a relatively inexpensive carrier' unit made in accordance with my invention. The load bearing surface consists of a plurality of pontoons I45 in the form of wood slats which are connected by flexible links or straps I46. The pontoons or slats are in contact with the vehicle roof along their entire lengths. A railing I41 of any desired construction may be secured to the pontoons, trated in the drawings by broken lines. The unit is secured to the vehicle roof by suitable brackets.

In one form of means of securing the unit to the roof, a strap I48 is secured to the pontoons I45. A hook element I49 is attached to the strap adjacent each end and the free ends of the strap are secured to buckles I50, only one being shown in the drawings. The unit is secured to the vehicle roof by placing the hook elements I49 under the sills or caves of the roof and drawing tight the free ends of the strap.

In an alternative means of securing the unit to the vehicle, a bracket member II comprising a hook element I52, strap I53 and buckle I54 is employed. The strap I53 is secured to the terminal pontoon by means of staples I55 which are secured to the pontoons. It is obvious that a plurality of such brackets are employed. In securing the unit to the roof, the hook members I52 are placed under the sills of the roof and the straps I53 drawn tigh In the modification illustrated in Figs. 11 and 12, the unit comprises a plurality ofconnected, which extend transversely of the vehicl 'roof. The pontoons I56 comprise open-end box-like supporting members comprising a base I51, upwardly turned sides I58 and I59, which may be at substantially right angles to the base, and inwardly turned top sections or flanges I60 and I6I. The sides and flanges are preferably out along a plurality of lines, as at I62, to permit the units to be bent or curved to conform to the contour of the vehicle roof. The flanges I60 and I6I are clamped between plates I63 and I64. In adjusting the units for a particular roof, the bolts I65 are loosened and the box-like unit placed upon the roof. After the sections are bent to the desired contour, the flanges are securely clamped between plates I63 and I64 by drawing tight bolts I65.

the railing being illus- The sides I58 and I59 are preferably provided I with tongues I66 and I61, respectively, which are turned inwardly. If desired, to strengthen the end structure, the tongues may be welded to the base I51 and the respective flanges. A cross bar I68 spans the open ends of the box-like units and is secured to the sides I58 and I59 and tongues I66 and I61, as by welding. The boxlike supporting units or pontoons are connected by links I69 which are secured pivotally to the tongues of adjacent supporting units or pontoons. A railing I10, similar in construction to the railing illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6, is secured to the corners of the terminal pontoons. The railing differs in that the transverse bars I1I are fixedly secured to the end or corner posts, and the iongitugiinal bars I12 are mounted pivotally to a corner post and secured to the opposite corner post by a thumb screw or bolt.

The carrier unit or grid rack is secured .to the roof I13 by means of brackets I14 which'comprise a tie gnember I15 provided .with a'plurality of spaced apertures I16 and which, terminates in a hook-like extremity I11. The bracket is secured to an angle member I18 by means of screw .,I19. The angle member is secured tofcros's bar "I68 of,the supporting members or pontoons I56fby means of bolt I90. Although each of the supporting members may be providedwithbrackets,

. collapsed position of it is, in general, entirelysatisfactd fyttc provide only the terminal members with thebracketsI".

In mounting the carrier on a vehicle roof, the opposite tie members I15 are adjusted roughly .to grip the eaves or sills oi the roof by securing the tie members to the angle members I18 by the proper aperture I16. The screw I is then drawn tight to secure the unit to the vehicle roof between the eaves or sills.

It is apparent that the supporting member or pontoon I56 may be used in pairs to support relatively long loads, such asskiis, ladders, and the like. In such use. two individual pontoons are mounted on the vehicle roof, one adjacent the forward end of the roof and the other adjacent the rearward portion of the rOOf. The ladder or other article is placed on the pontoons and may be secured to the pontoons by means of straps.

In Figs. 13, 14 and 15, I have illustrated a further modification of the carrier unit in which the pontoons I8I are collapsible and extend transversely of the vehicle roof. The pontoons comprise pans I82 which are maintained in spaced relation with respect to roof I80 by means of stanchions I83 which are preferably hinged to the depending sides of the stanchions I83. In the the carrier unit, the stanchions I83 may be pivoted into a position substantially parallel to the pans, as illustrated in Fig. 15. The pontoons are connected by links I84 which are secured pivotally to the depending ends of the pans. A railing I90, similar to the railing described in Figs. 5 and 6, may be secured to the pontoons.

The carrier unit issecured to the roof I80 by means of brackets [85. The brackets comprise a tie member I86 which terminates at one end in a hook-like member I81. The tie member I86 is preferably more or less flexible so as to be adapted to conform to the contour of the shoulder of the roof. The hook-like member I81 is adapted to grip the sill or cave of the roof. The opposite end 01' the tie member is bent upwardly to form a head member I88. The brackets are adjustably secured to the pontoons by means of bolts I89.

In mounting the unit on the vehicle roof, the stanchions are pivoted into positions substantially at right angles to the pans. The railing is extended and the unit placed on the vehicle roof. The brackets are placed over the eaves of the roof and the bolts I89 drawn tight. In removing the unit from the roof, the steps are reversed. After the stanchions are pivoted into positions substantially parallel to the pans, the pans are stacked upon each other and one side of the railing pivoted into a position substantially parallel to the top pan, as illustrated in Fig. 15.

Although the load bearing surfaces described and illustrated hereinbefore are discontinuous, it is entirely feasible to provide a substantially continuous load bearing surface, as illustrated in Figs. 16 and 17. In this modification, one of the terminal pontoons I9I comprises a load bearing surface I92 having depending longitudinal skirts I93 and I9l. The remaining pontoons I95 comprise a load bearing surface I96 having a single depending longitudinal skirt I91. The skirts are preferably Provided with a rubber or other covering to prevent marring of the surface of the roof.

The load bearing surfaces I96 of pontoons I95 are each provided with lateral slots I98. Rivets I99 are secured to load bearing surfaces I96 of the pontoons adjacent the skirts I91, and project upwardly through the lateral slots I98 of the adjacent overlapping pontoon. Load bearing surface I92 is provided with rivets 200 adjacent skirt I94 and which rivets project upwardly through lateral slots I98 of the adjacent overlapping pontoon I95. The load bearing surfaces I96 of the adjacent pontoons may be moved laterally of each other to collapse the unit, as illustrated in Fig. 1'7, the slots I98 sliding along the rivets.

A railing 20I, similar in construction to that described hereinbefore, may be secured to the terminal pontoons. Brackets 202 are secured to skirt I92 and similar brackets are secured to skirt I91 of the opposite terminal pontoon, and are adapted to tensionally secure the pontoons to the vehicle roof. The brackets 202 are preferably in line with slots I98 and rivets I99. On drawing tight the brackets, the pontoons are in effect pulled down into contact with the vehicle roof and tensionally secured between the eaves or sills of the roof.

The carrier units illustrated in Figs. 18 and 19 are provided with a container or duffel bag. In the carrier unit illustrated in Fig. 18, a plurality of pontoons 203, in the form of wood or metal slats, are connected by links 204 which may be of metal or fabric or other suitable construction. Brackets 205 are secured to the terminal pontoons and serve as means for removably mounting the carrier unit to the vehicle roof. A duffel bag 206 is mounted on the pontoons by means of straps 201 secured to staples 208. If desired, the bag may be permanently fixed to the pontoons, as by grommets.

In the unit illustrated in Fig. 19, the pontoons 209, in the form of wood or metal slats, are positioned within the duffel bag 2I0. The slats may be merely placed in the-bag; but I prefer to provide means for preventing the slats from shifting in position during use of the unit. Such means may comprise a band or strap 2I I which is secured to the bag at spaced intervals by means of grommets 2I2 or by other suitable means. as by stitching Or sewing the strap to the bottom of the bag at spaced intervals. The slats are posismall space for storage purposes when not in use.

By placing the slats or pontoons within the bag. it is not necessary to secure an elastic or resilient material to the under surfaces of the pontoons or slats to prevent marring of the surface of the vehicle roof by the pontoons. This type of construction provides a sattisfactory unit for supporting loads upon the vehicle roof and also provides a covering for the load.

In Fig. 20, I have illustrated an alternative means for providing adjustment of the brackets. The bracket 2I8 includes a hook-like member or element 2| 1 which is adapted to grip the sill or cave of the roof, an adjusting plate 2I8 and a tie member 2I9 which is secured to the pontoon 220. The hook-like element and tie member are provided with spaced apertures, as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3. A pair of spaced threaded nuts 22l are secured to plate 2I8 registering with spaced apertures in the plate. To prevent marring of the surface of the roof, the nuts are preferably covered with rubber, as indicated at 223. The bracket is adjusted by placing a desired aperture in tie member 2I9 and hook member 2I1 over the appropriate apertures in plate 2I8 and thread ing screws 222 into the nuts 22 I.

It is to be understood that the foregoing description is merely illustrative of my invention and that various modifications will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art, and may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention. For example, the pontoons may be formed with a nonyielding are or curvature to conform to the contour of the roof, or with an under-arc or lesser curvature than the curvature of the roof, or with an over-arc or greater curvature than the curvature of the roof, in the latter cases, the loading of the unit and the mounting of the unit causing the curvature of the pontoons to conform to that of the roof. The pontoons might also be rigidly joined to form a non-collapsible unit, if desired. It is also possible that for certain purposes, it may be desirable to omit the railing, or modifications of the railing may be desired. The surfaces or edges which contact the surface of the roof may be provided with molded rubber shoes or channels which are permanentl secured to such surfaces or edges.

I claim:

1. A carrier unit adapted to be removably mounted on the roof of a vehicle comprising a plurality of longitudinally extending pontoons each comprising a load bearing surface having depending skirts adapted to bear upon the roof, links pivotally secured to lateral depending skirts of adjacent pontoons, an upwardly extending railing secured to the outer corners of the terminal pontoons, and a pair of brackets secured to each of the terminal pontoons and adapted to secure the. pontoons on the roof, each of the brackets comprising a hook-like member adapted to grip a sill of the roof and a tie member secured at one end to the hook-like member and at the other end to the outer depending skirt of a terminal pontoon.

secured to the terminal pontoons and adapted to secure the pontoons on the roof, each of the brackets comprising an angle member secured to the outer longitudinal depending skirt of a terminal pontoon and a tie member terminating in a hook-like extremity secured to the angle member.

RAY-C. STRAUSS.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification224/314, 224/329, 224/325, 217/46, 190/100
International ClassificationB60R9/045, B60R9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB60R9/045
European ClassificationB60R9/045