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Publication numberUS2388513 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1945
Filing dateDec 31, 1942
Priority dateDec 31, 1942
Publication numberUS 2388513 A, US 2388513A, US-A-2388513, US2388513 A, US2388513A
InventorsZwickel Elmer L
Original AssigneeZwickel Elmer L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aerial toy
US 2388513 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1945.

E. L. ZWICKEL AERIAL TOY Filed Dec. 31, 1942 3 Sheets-Sheet l jA/VE/VTJR.

Nov. 6, 1945. E. L. ZWICKEL AERIAL TOY Filed Dec. :51, 194-2 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 55 JJWENTJJZ.

Nov. 6, 1945. E. L. zw|cKEL AERIAL TO! 5 Sheets-Shet 5 Filed Dec. 51, 1942 Patented Nov. 6, 1945 7 Q 1 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AERIAL TOY Elmer L. Zwickel, Chicago, Ill.

Application December 31, 1942, Serial No. 470,714

10 Claims. (CI. 4677) The invention relates to an instructive and Fig. 5 is vertical sectional view of the missile entertaining device and more particularly to a. container, taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 2. novel toy consisting of an organization of ele- Fig. 6 is a plan view of the blank from which ments including a novelly constructed aircraft the fuselage is formed.

arranged and operable to simulate an air attack 5 Fig. '7 is a plan view of the wing blank.

on ground objectives. 7 Fig. 8 is a. plan view of the stabilizer blank.

The device generally is concerned with th con Fig. 9 is an enlarged detailed sectional view struction and organization of a game apparatus of the flap and tab interlock used for joining intended to afford considerable entertainment various P t Of the fuselageand develop a players ability to physically re- 10 10 is a detail of a p y Constructionact to mental impressions gained by observa- Fig. llisadetail ofapulley part.

tion. The invention is concerned primarily with the An object of the invention i t provid an construction and functions of the aircraft I l aerial toy with controlled means remotely operbest illustrated in Figs- 1 and which may be able to release missiles. l5 used independently of the other parts of the Another object is to provide an aerial toy with comp ete g e pp AS best Shown i novel means to retain missiles. the game y include a playing fi 0 ta Another object is to provide an aerial toy area i otherwise provided pref formed from sheet material scored and die-cut era'bly on the mslqe faice bottom of for easy assembly and positive interlocking at its 539 box or other contamer m whlch the apparatus various parts. enclosed when not in use. The playing field or Another object is to provide a sheet blanked taiget'area may i q Vamus F out to provide complemental aerial toy parts prmted theyeon deslred movable oblects which, when assembled, are positively interas shlps' bmmmgs tanks may be locked. lectively arranged thereon.

Another object is to provide a knock-down assenimmgihe game the box aerial toy formed of Sheet material blanked and portion I3 is positioned end to end with the box top Hi, as shown, and suitable uprights I! are easy assembly and Whmh Substan' inserted, one in each outside end wall of each box portion These uprights may be of one piece Another object is. to provide a game including a playing field or targetand an associated aerial but It 18 Preferred that they be provided m two or more sections as shown so as to readily fit toy movable into a selective POSltlOIl'fOI dischargwithin the box when disassembled Any acceptr mg mlssnes w ed structure may be employed in providing these i p oblect Is provlde aerla'l game uprights such as for example the tubular telewnslstm? of of reafmy as sembled scoping structure illustrated. In the. operation parts whmh be easlly and qu1k1y dlsassem' of the instance apparatus it is necessary that one bled and Store? asa compact of the uprights extend higher than the other so The foregomg and such other oblects of the that a trolley l8 connected at its ends'to the invention as will appear hereinafter as the de- 40 upper ends of said uprights 111 be inclined down.

scription proceeds will be more readily underwardly towards th box portion having the t stood from a perusal of the following specificap therein tion, in which reference is made to the accom- 11; l become vid t h w v that other panying drawings;wherein1 means than that illustrated may be utilized to 1 is perspective view of the improved ga support a trolley in an inclined position above showing it set up and in use. a playing field or any other object which it is Fig. 2 is a longitudinal central sectional view desired to use as a target. For example, the through the fuselage of t e a r t ing opposed ends of the trolley can be attached readpart of adevice. ily to suitably positioned chairs or other ar- Fig. 3 is a vertical transverse sectional view ticles of furniture or the like which may be availtaken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2. able.

Fig. 4 is an inverted plane "view of a portion The trolley I8 is adapted to support a toy ai of the fuselage showing parts of the bottom wall .crait, such as, for example, the airplane l9 illusbroken away to better illustrate its constructrated, in a manner to permit said aircraft to tion; taken on line 44 of Fig.2. l gravitate along the inclined trolley into a position over and above the target area l2. At any time during the travel of said aircraft along said trolley the player may, in a manner to be better understood as the description proceeds, actuate means within the aircraft to release suitable missiles 2| therefrom which gravitate freely towards the target-area.

Referring now to the specific construction of a selected form of aircraft IS, the body or fuselage 22.ther.eof preferably is formedfroma suitable piece of sheet material such as cardboard, pressboard, fibre-board, heavy paper or the like, which is die-cut for ready separation (punch-. out) from a larger sheet and suitably scored and slotted to facilitate an interlocking of certain.

portions upon being properly foldedinto the desired shape. fuselage 22 consists of a top wall 23, sidewalls 24, and a bottom wall 25, all preferably interconnected at their tail portions along scored lines 26 and having complemental slottedv flaps 21 and tabs 28 at their free forward-end portions. When the sheet isfolded along the scored lines 26 to provide an elongated body or fuselage, preferably tapering at each end, the complemental tabs 28 and flap 21, and tabs 29 and flaps 3| on the complemented-edges of the tailportion, are. interlocked. The forward or nose portion of the fuselage may be suitably closed by overlapping flaps 32 having complemental ina terlocking tabs 33 and slots 34-as shown.

A win portion 35, best shown in Fig. 7, also is formed from a piece of sheet material and is adapted to be fitted transversely through aligned slotted openings provided in the fuselage at the junctures of the top wall with the side walls, as at 36. Inadvertent shifting of the wing is prevented by providing thereon partially severed portions 31- which arefolded upwardly against the opposite edges of the fuselage top wall 23-after the wing is in place. These portions 31 constitute spaced hanger arms between which a suitable roller. 38 or other nonfriction element is journaled and by means of which the aircraft is suspended for free movement along the trolley IS.

The wing 35 also has a flap 39 on its leading edge of a length slightly greater than the width of the top wall. As best shown in Figs. 2 and 3 this flap is folded downwardly at an incline to interlock with inclined slots 40, one provided in the upper edge of each fuselage side wall 24. A tab 4| is also provided in the fuselage top wall 23 for interlocking engagement with a slot 42 centrally located on the leading edge ofsaid wing. It should be apparent that the wing 35 is securely interlocked with the fuselage side walls and that the top wall 23 is interlocked with the wing, thereby providing a rigid adequately reinforced structure for withstanding any strain imposed thereon while suspended.

The stabilizer 43 illustrated in Fig. 8 preferably has parallel slots 44 extending inwardly from one edge for interlocking engagement with the fuselage side walls 24 when' the former is mounted in place. If desired, a rudder 45, best illustrated in Fig. 2, may be mounted on the rear end'of the fuselage top wall and a propeller 46 may be affixed to the fuselage nose in any suitable manner, such as for example, by a pin forced through the four material thicknesses covering the nose end;

Inadvertent withdrawal of the various tabs 28', 29 and 33 from their complemental slots may be prevented by providing eachstabwith a As best illustrated. in Fig. 6, the

suitable lip 50 which tends to move out of the plane of its tab after the latter is inserted through its slot.

The fuselage 22 is provided with a suitable receptacle or container 41 within which one or more missiles 2| are adapted to be placed. This receptacle may best be formed by cutting a suitable fiap 48 in the fuselage top wall and bending said flap downwardly at an incline into the body thereof during assembly. The flap 48 is retained in such folded down position by inter- =locking engagement of tabs 49, provided on its opposed edges, with suitable slots 5| in the fuselage side Walls. The cutting and dislocation of the flap leaves an opening in the fuselage top wall through which the missiles are loaded. The fuselage bottom wall is similarly provided-With a flap 52 having like tabs 53 on its opposed edges which interlock with slots 54 in the fuselage side walls to retain said flap in an upwardly inclined position. As best shown in Fig. 2, the top wall flap 48 terminates short of the fuselage. bottom wallthereby leaving a space 55. for reception of a closure 55 for the bottom wall opening.

The closure 56 also is formed. of sheet material and as shown in Fig. 4, it is substantially tapered lengthwise to conform to the fuselage tail contour and terminates in a narrow extension 51 which projects rearwardly of the tail portion. The forward or enlarged end of the closure member has transversely extending opposed tabs 58 each ofv which extends through one of a pair of guide openings 59 provided in the fuselage side walls. The closure member 56. normally is positioned as illustrated. in Fig. 2 so as to close the fuselage bottom wallopening to retain the missiles 2| in the receptacle. Movement of the closure member 56 is effected manually by remote control by means of a cord 6| or other flexible element which is always maintained within easy reach of the player.

In use, the aircraft is positioned and held at the highest end of the. trolley H! with the control cord 6| hanging slack and the closure 56 in its closed position. The aircraft is then released and it gravitates downwardly along the trolley. Its rate of travel can be increased or decreased by increasing or decreasing the degree of trolley incline. This movement carries the aircraft over the target area and, at any time believed to be opportune by the player, the closure control cord BI is tensioned momentarily. This draws the closure 55 rearwardly the length of the guide openings 59 and the missile or missiles are freed and drop from the fuselage onto the target area. The aircraft is then returned to the high end of the trolley and reloaded. In order to facilitate recording of hits upon any specified target area or other object, the missiles 2| may be provided with a piercingelement, such as for example, a needle. point 62, so as to be retained at the pointoffimpact until manually removed.

It should be evident that avery entertaining organization is provided. wherein two or more players may cooperate to the extent of each operating the device a predetermined number of times and recording the number or value of hits in predetermined target areas. The device also tends to develop the ability of the player to coordinate physical re-action with observation. In other Words, a. player may become quite skilled in observing the. precise position required by the aircraft to cause, the missiles to hit a, predetermined target area; andv responding. instantaneously by tensioning the cord to discharge the missiles at the intended place.

While a conventional pulley 38 has been illustrated in the assembly views herein as preferred, the built-up punch-out pulley illustrated in Figs. and 11 may be provided. As there illustrated the pulley includes a hub 63 formed of a rolled sheet, having tabs 64 at its ends insertable in slots 65 in the pulley flanges or disks 66. A pin 61 pierces the centers of the discs for mounting the pulley on the hanger arms 31. Catching of the trolley IS in the slit at the joining of the hub to the disks is avoided by providing washers 68 at the hub ends.

Although an examplary form of apparatus has been illustrated herein it should be understood that the organization as a whole is capable of incorporating a variety of modifications and that the aircraft illustrated in detail may embody variations from the shape and precise structure shown providing such device includes means to retain and instantaneously release missiles upon elective operation without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A toy aircraft including an elongated body having top, bottom and side walls, hangers on said top wall adapted to be engaged with an elevated trolley whereby the aircraft can move substantially horizontally, a fiap formed in the top wall to define an opening when said flap is folded downwardly into said body, a flap in the bottom wall to define an aligned opening when said flap is folded upwardly into said body, means securing said flaps in such folded position to provide spaced front and rear walls of a receptacle having as its sides the side walls of said body, a movable closure for the bottom wall opening whereby at least one missile may be retained in said receptacle, and means operable to move the closure to discharge the missile.

2. A toy aircraft including a hollow body having a top wall, a bottom wall and connecting side walls, a flap partially severed from said top wall, a flap partially severed from said bottom wall, said flaps being in substantially vertical alignment and being folded each along an unsevered edge into the space between said side walls, said flaps and portions of the side walls defining a missile chamber, an obstruction for the bottom wall opening whereby a missile is retained in said chamber, and control means connected to said obstruction operative to move it from a closed into an open position to discharge the missile.

3. A toy aircraft including a body formed from sheet material folded to define a top wall, a bottom wall and connecting side walls, a sheet material wing portion insertable beneath the top wall through slotted openings at the junctures of said wall with the respective side walls, a flap on the leading edge of said wing portion, and said side walls each having an angularly disposed slot communicating with the respective slotted openings both to receive said flap when the wing portion is in place to reinforce the wing against flexing longitudinally and prevent its movement upwardly away from its contact with the side walls.

4. A toy aircraft including a hollow body having a top wall, a bottom wall and connecting side walls, a flap partially severed from said top wall,

a fiap partially severed from said bottom wall, said flaps being in substantially vertical alignment and being folded each along an unsevered edge into the space between said side walls, said flaps defining front and rear walls of a missile chamber,

, an obstruction for the bottom wall opening whereby a missile is retained in said chamber, and control means connected to said obstruction operative to move it from a closed into an open position to discharge the missile.

5. A toy aircraft including an elongated body having top, bottom and side walls, hangers on said top wall adapted to be engaged with an elevated trolley whereby the aircraft can move substantially horizontally, a flap formed in the top wall to define an opening when said flap is folded downwardly into said body, a flap in the bottom wall to define an aligned opening when said flap is folded upwardly into said body, means securing said flaps in such folded position to provide spaced front and rear walls of a receptacle within said body, a movable closure for the bottom wall opening whereby at least one missile may be retained in said receptacle, and means operable to move the closure to discharge the missile.

6. A toy aircraft including a hollow body having a top wall, a bottom Wall and connecting side walls, spaced partitions in said body to define with said side walls a missile receptacle, at least one of said partitions being inclined, said top and bottom walls having openings communicating with said receptacle, a longitudinally slidable closure for the bottom wall opening, and means operable to move said closure.

'7. A one-piece fuselage for a toy aircraft comprising a top wall, two side walls and a bottom wall, the top and bottom walls having openings therein defined by partially severed flap portions, said flap portions being foldable into the fuselage to define front and rear walls of a receptacle.

8. A toy aircraft including a hollow body having a top wall, a bottom wall and connecting side walls, said top wall having an opening, a flap partially severed from the bottom wall, said flap being in substantial alignment with the top wall opening and foldable upwardly between the side walls, said fiap defining an end wall of a receptacle having as its side walls the side walls of the body, and a movable closure for the opening formed in the bottom wall upon folding the flap.

9. A fuselage for a toy aircraft formed of a blank folded and interlocked to provide a bottom wall, side walls and a top wall joined along complemental edges by folds, said top and bottom walls each having an opening, at least one edge of the top opening being out of vertical alignment with the complemental end edge of the bottom opening, and an inclined transverse partition wall in said fuselage having its top and bottom edges in substantial registry with the said end edges respectively of said wall openings.

10. A fuselage for a toy aircraft formed of a blank folded and interlocked to provide a bottom wall, side walls and a top wall joined along complemental edges 'by folds, and flaps partially severed one from the top wall and one from the bottom wall foldable into a position between the side walls when the fuselage is formed, the folding of said flaps defining a top and bottom wall opening.

ELMER L. ZWICKEL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2512421 *Dec 29, 1945Jun 20, 1950Fay Frank JRemote-control bomb release toy
US2527683 *Oct 12, 1945Oct 31, 1950John MaloDart game
US2634127 *Jul 12, 1945Apr 7, 1953Shapiro William JToy bomb dropping airplane
US2657930 *Mar 23, 1951Nov 3, 1953Reus John JToy bomber and bomb carrier and release mechanism
US3600843 *Nov 24, 1969Aug 24, 1971Becker Joseph TToy
US3838855 *Aug 20, 1971Oct 1, 1974J BeckerVehicle landing control
US3883140 *Feb 1, 1974May 13, 1975Becker Joseph TTarget and sliding projectile
US4080750 *May 28, 1976Mar 28, 1978Arnaldo PalumboToy aircraft
US4177991 *Jan 31, 1978Dec 11, 1979Marvin Glass & AssociatesAmusement apparatus
US4522605 *Aug 1, 1983Jun 11, 1985Guay Jr Lawrence AGravity-operated toy
US5286033 *Mar 23, 1992Feb 15, 1994Mark WayneParachute game and target
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/228, D21/465, 273/351, 446/230
International ClassificationA63H27/00, A63F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63H27/004, A63F9/0247
European ClassificationA63F9/02F, A63H27/00C