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Publication numberUS2389985 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 27, 1945
Filing dateMay 23, 1941
Priority dateMay 23, 1941
Publication numberUS 2389985 A, US 2389985A, US-A-2389985, US2389985 A, US2389985A
InventorsGeorge E Justice, Frank M Thurston, Furman N Young
Original AssigneeHouston Oil Field Mat Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Retractable packer
US 2389985 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N0 27 l945- G. E. Jugs-HCE ET AL. 2,389,985

RETRACTABLE PACKER Filed May 23, 1941 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 C) 3mm Nov. 27, 1945.` G. E. JUSTICE ET AL. 29399985 RETRACTABLE PACKER Filed May 25, 1941 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Patented Nov. 27, F945 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE RETRACTABLE PACKER George E. Justice, Frank M. Thurston, and Furman N. Young, Houston, Tex., assignors to Houston Oil Field Material Company, Inc., Houston, Tex., a corporation of Delaware Application May 23, 1941, Serial No. 394,784

.(Cl. 16S-12) 8 Claims.

vide an improved packer which is adapted to be set in sealing position within a well bore against upward displacement and having means for equalizing the pressures above and below the same prior to release or unsetting thereof, whereby the packer may be effectively employed as a cement retainer and readily released and retrieved after setting of the cement,

A particular object of the invention is to provide an improved packer, of the character described, which may be repeatedly set and released within a wellbore without removing the packer from the well bore so as to permit use of said packer at various depths.

A further object o! the invention is to provide an improved packer which, after having been Figure 8 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of Figure 1,

Figure 9 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line 9-9 of Figure 1,

Figure 10 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line Illof Figure 1, and

Figure 11 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line I I -I I of Figure 2.

In the drawings, the numeral I0 designates a .cement retainer; however, it is pointed out that this device could be employed as a packer and isnot limited to mere use as a cement retainer. The device is providedwith an elongate, cylindrical, hollow mandrel or body II which extends substantially throughout the device, The mandrel extends below the lowermost end of said device, and is provided with external screw threads I2 at its lower end so as to receive a cage I3. Coniined between the lower end of the mandrel Il and within the cage I3 is a ball valve I4 so as to allow uid to iiow downwardly through said mandrel, and prevent iiuid from flowing upwardly therethrough. 1

A tubular member or sleeve I5 surrounds the upper portion of the mandrel II and is slidable thereon. The upper end of the mandrel II has its outer circumference enlarged so as to form Y a shoulder I6, and is provided with a plurality set, may be actuated to relieve the pressure therebelow and then released without moving tire structure of said packer.

A construction designed to carry out the invention will be hereinafter described, together with other features of the invention,

The invention will be more readily understood' from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings, in which an example of the invention is shown, and wherein:

Figure 1 is a vertical sectional view of a device constructed in accordance with the invention,

the en- Figure 2 is a view similar to Figure; 1, showing Figure 6 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of Figure 1,

Figure '7l is a horizontal, cross-sectional view taken on the line 1-1 of Figure 1,

of ports I1 near its upper end. The sleeve I5 is provided with internal screw threads I8 at its upper end, and the bore of said sleeve is reduced to form a shoulder I9. The reduced bore of the sleeve l5 slidably engages the mandrel below the shoulder I9. The bore of the sleeve I5, below the shoulder I8, is provided with a plurality of annular recesses 20, Lying within said recesses are circular packing rings 2| which prevent the ilow of fluid thereby.

'A plurality of ports 22 are provided in the sleeve I5 below the packing rings 2|. All of the ports 22 are constructed identieally'and the description of one is deemed suillcient. 'Ihe bore of the inner portion of said port is reduced so as to form a shoulder v23, and the outer portion of said bore is provided with internal screw threads 24. Slidable within the. bore of said port is a pin 25 which has an enlarged head 26 that abuts the shoulder 23 so as to limit the inward movement of the pin'. The screw threads 24 of each port receive an externally screwthreaded nut 21 and a coiled or helical spring 28 is confined between the enlarged head 26 of l the pin and the nut so as to constantly urge said pin inwardly.1' An annular recess 29 is formed in the external surface of the mandrel II and the pins 25 engage within the recess when the ports 22 are in horizontal allnement with said recess, thereby releasably locking the sleeve I5 and mandrel together in the position shown in Fig. 1. In this position, an internal, annular shoulder 30, formed in the bore of the sleeve below the ports 22 by reducing the diameter of said sleeve bore, abuts the shoulder I6 of the mandrel. Thus, downward movement of the mandrel relative to the sleeve beyond the aforesaid locked position is prevented.

A plurality of annular, upwardly-directed ratchet teeth 3| .are formed on kthe external surface of the sleeve I5 and the lowermost tooth is disposed in substantially the same plane as the shoulder 33 of said sleeve. Below the teeth 3|, the external diameter of the sleeve is reduced and provided with a clutch member 32 which has an external diameter 'slightly less than the internal diameter of said teeth. External screwthreads 33 are formed in the sleeve some distance below the clutch member and receive an internally screw-threaded collar or nut 34 having a plurality of longitudinal recesses formed in its external periphery, as ls most clearly shown in Fig. 9. The external diameter of the sleeve is again reduced below the screw-threads 33 to provide an annular, downwardly-directed shoulder 35 and, below this shoulder, said sleeve has a slightly enlarged external diameter, an annular, tapered shoulder 36 being formed at the upper end of this enlarged portion. As shown by the numeral 31, the lower extremity of the -sleeve terminates above or short of the lower end of the device. f

An annular flange 36 is provided on the outer circumference of the sleeve I5, below the screwthreaded portion I9 thereof, and a clutch means 33 is provided on the underside of said flange. A plurality of ports 40 are provided in said sleeve below the clutch means 39 and above the shoulder I9 so as to permit the passage of fluid from the exterior to the interior thereof. A coupling 4| is provided on the upper end of said sleeve and has an axial bore 42 extending therethrough. The coupling 4I is provided with an inwardlydirected flange 43 which extends into the bore 42 to form a reduced opening 44 and the underside of the ange 43 forms a shoulder 45 which limits the travel of the mandrel II, as will be hereinafter explained. A plurality of splines 42' are provided on the coupling within the upper end of its bore 42 above the flange 43, and above said splines the coupling is provided with internal screw threads which may be either left-hand or right-hand as desired. A suitable member (not shown) is screwed into said threads, and has splines which mate with the splines 42 so that the connecting member acts to rigidly connect the device to the tubing (not shown).

A ring valve 46 encircles the upper end of the mandrel and rests upon the shoulder I9 of the sleeve I5. The valve 46 has a depending annular flange 41 on its bottom, and is provided with a plurality of packing rings 48 which prevent the passage of fluid between said valve and the mandrel II, and between said valve and the inner bore of the sleeve I5. A coil spring 49 is confined between the lower end of the couplingv 4| and the upper end of the valve 46. The spring 49 acts at all times to urge said valve downwardly cannot enter the ports 40 and pass upwardly through the sleeve into the coupling 4I. It is pointed out that the device is run into the well on a suitable string of tubing or pipe (not shown).

As the pressure beneath the valve 46 is increased, it will urge the valve 46 upwardly against the tension of the spring 49 to such a point that fluid is free to flow from the 'ports 40 of the sleeve I5 through the ports I1 of the mandrel and 4up through the coupling 4| and pipe (not shown) A tubular member or collar 50 is disposed concentrically around the sleeve below the flange 38, and a clutch means 5I is provided on the upper end of said member for coacting with the clutch means 29 of said flange. A plurality of recesses 52 are provided in the outer circumference of said member below the clutch means 5|. Dogs 53 lie within said recesses and are confined therein by screws 54. A plurality of recesses 55 are provided on the underside of the dogs 53, and confined within said recesses and the bottom of the recesses 52 are coil springs 56 which urge the dogs outwardly. It is pointed out that the dogs are free to move inwardly, compressing the springs 56, and their outward travel is limited by the screws 54.

The outer circumference of the member 50, below the lowermost screw 54 is reduced to form an annular depression 51 in the circumference of said member. A plurality of openings 58 are provided in the member 50 opening outwardly into the depression 51, and lying within said openings are nut sections 59 of a sectional nut, having ratchet teeth 60 on their inner surface. The teeth 60 mate with the teeth 3| of the sleeve I5. The outer portion of each nut section 59 is enlarged to form a shoulder 6| which abuts a shoulder 62 provided in the opening 58, thereby limiting the inward travel of said nut section. A plurality of garter springs 63 are disposed within the depression 51 and extend through openings in the nut sections 59 so as to constantly urge said nut sections inwardly as lshown in Figure 1.

Due to the provision of the ratchet teeth 3| and 6l), the nut sections will snap or be forced outwardly upon downward movement of the sleeve I5 relative to the member 50. Thus, mere lowering of the sleeve will cause the teeth 3| thereof to become disengaged from the teeth of the nut sections. However, in order to move the sleeve upwardly relative to the member, said sleeve must be rotated so as to screw the teeth together and then past each other.

A plurality of longitudinal openings or slots 64, are formed in the member 50 below the depression 51 and anchoring means, such as a double-step slip 65 having upwardly-directed, pipe-engaging teeth 66 on its outer surface, is positioned within each slot. The reverse or inner surface of each slip is tapered inwardly and downwardly toward the teeth 66 from its upper end as shown at 61 and then projects radially away from said teeth to provide an upwardly facing shoulder 68. A similar tapered surface 69 is provided below the shoulder 66, whereby each slip has a pair of similarly tapered surfaces instead of the usual single or continuous inclined inner surface. Each slip 65 is confined within its slot 64 by a counter-sunk screw 10 which engages in the member 50 intermediate said slot and the depression 51 so that its head overlies the upper extremity of said slip. An upstanding, angular lip or flange 1I is formed at the lower end of each slot so as to overlie the lower extremity of the slip and assist in coniining the same within said slot. Each screw 10 and lip 1| are so positioned relativeto their respective slip that limited radial movement of said slip is permitted. It is pointed out that the number of slips is not criticalgand that the same could be provided with a different type o! taper,

' The shoe 12, below the shoulder 14, slidably engages the lowermost end portion of the sleeve I5. The lowermost end portion of the shoe 'I2 is provided with external screw threads 16. Above the screw-threaded portion, the outercircumference of said shoe is enlarged so as to form a ange 11. Surrounding the shoe and resting on said flange, are a plurality of packing rings 10. It is pointed out that any suitable compressible packer or packing rings may be employed.

Below the flange 11, and above the screwthreaded portion 16, the shoe' 12 is provided with a plurality of upwardly-directed ports 'I9 which communicate with an internal, annular groove 80 provided in the bore of said shoe. Above the groove 80, the bore 13 is providedwith a plurality of annular recesses 8| which receive packing rings 82. The packing rings 82 prevent the flow of fluid in either direction. Similar annular recesses B3 for receiving packing rings 84 are formed below the groove 80, whereby fluid is prevented from flowing upwardly or downwardly when the device is in the position shown in Figure 1.

The lowermost end of the shoe 12 is provided with a plurality of upwardly-extending Slots 85, and latches 86 are pivotally suspended by pins 81 within said slots. A spring 88 encircles each pin 81 and actsto urge the latch suspended therefrom inwardly at all times. The mandrel II is provided with an annular groove 89 on its outer circumference, and the latches 86 engage within said groove when the device is in the position shown in Figure l, and remain there engaged until the device is desired toy be released, as will be hereinafter explained.

A cage 90, having an upstanding collar 9| which is internally screw-threaded, is attached to the screw-threads 16 of the shoe and the springs 88 bear against the inner surface of the collar. The lower end of the cage 90 slidably engages the mandrel II and is provided with a plurality of annular recesses 32 for receiving packing rings 93, the rings sealing the space between said cage and mandrel and being so constructed that the upward flow of iluid through said space is prevented. However, the downward iiow of fluid is permitted by the construction rof the packing rings.

A flanged bushing 04 is screw-threadedly atthe bushing for coactlon with the clutch means v32 oi the sleeve upon downward relative movement ot said sleeve. A plurality of elongated. longitudinal grooves 95 are formed in the exterior of. the collar immediately below its connection with the bushing 94. Actuating means. such as an elongated ring or slip expander 96 is disposed, in sliding engagement with the exteriors of the collar and bushing above the packing rings 'I8 and has its upper portion engaging within the enlarged lower portion of the member 50. The outer surface of the ring 96 is provided with a pair vof similarly tapered surfaces 81 which are complementary to the tapered surfaces of the. slip 65. Due to the tapered surfaces of the ring and slip, upward movement of the ring relative to said slip will expand or move the slip outwardly in a radial direction.

The ring 06 is provided with a plurality of screw-threaded openings 98, each of which receives a pin 98 having an inwardly-directed lug |00 for engaging within one of the grooves 85 of the collar 15. For establishing communication between the interior of the collar 15 and the grooves A85, a plurality of ports I0| are formed.

in said collar. Similar ports |02 are 4formed in the ring adjacent its lower end and in registration with the grooves so that communication between said grooves and the exterior of said ring is established. Thus, fluid may flow from the exterior of the ring, through said ring and then through the collar 15, but is prevented from flowing downwardly by thevpackings 82 and 84.

In the operation, the tool is suspended from a suitable tubular member by the collar 4I, and is run into the hole or well bore until the position has been reached at which it is desired to set said device. It is pointed out that the dogs 53 are being urged outwardly at all times by the springs 56 so that they slidably engage the pipe or casing, and also said dogs are free to move inwardly if necessary.

It is pointed out that sometimes while the' device is being run into the well, the teeth 3| may snap through the nut sections 59. However. when the position in which the device is desired to be set has been reached, the sleeve I5 may be rotated while the member 50, ring 96 and shoe 'I2 will be held from rotating by the dogs 53. Upon right-hand rotation, or left-hand, if desired, the teeth 3l are screwed upwardly through the nut sections 50 (Fig. 2). Even though the teeth were completely below said nut sections, the sleeve I5 may be raised until the teeth 8l contacted the teeth 6|) of the nut sections 59 and then rotated so as to pass therethrough. A11 upward pull is then exerted upon the sleeve so as to move the nut 30 under the bushing 15 and exert 'an upward pull on the shoe 12. This will usually movement of the sleeve I5 will expand said slips tached to the upper end of the shoe collar 'I5 and slidably engages the intermediate portion of the sleeve I5 so as to be disposed above the nut.

34 carried by the screw-threads 33 of said sleeve. The lower end of the bushing 94 is adapted to engage the upper end of the nut to support the shoe 'i2 and suspend the same from the sleeve. Clutch means 94 is provided at the upper 'end of and expand the packer so that the tool will be in the position shown in Figure 2. At this time the tool is set and is ready for use.

In employing the device as a cement retainer, the cement is pumped down through the tubing (not shown) through the collar 4I and down through the mandrel I I, unseating the ball It so as to allow the cement to flow out through the cage I3. In using this device as a cement retainer, there is usually provided above the device a suitable set of jars which will allow fluid, when said jars are open, to iiow down the tubing or l said jars.

by pumping down the tubing will act through Such a suitable set of jars is shown in the patent to Ross Bassinger, No. 2,317,021, granted April 20, 1943, for By-pass and releasing means. In cementing practice there is usually mud or what is commonly called drilling fluid in the tubing, and it is desirable to pump this out into the casing above the packer. This is done after the packer has been set, and then the drilling fluid is followed .by a clear water which is followed by cement. The jars should be shut before the cement reaches the predetermined point. The jars are ordinarily operated by longitudinal movement, and to cpen them the tubing is slightly lowered. When this occurs the upward strain on the device is relieved. However, pressure beneath the packer will keep the device set, but it is desirable to'have some means of locking the sleeve I5 from a downward movement. This is done by means of the pins 29 and the annular recess 24 in the mandrel II, which locks the mandrel and the sleeve together. The mandrel I Icannot move downwardly as it is suspended by the latches 86, and a pressure is acting upwardly on the lower end of the mandrel as well as the lower end of the packer, thereby supporting the sleeve I5 and the coupling 4I and other means between it and the lower end of the jars.

After the desired amount of cement has been placed in the well, the pump pressure down through the tubing and the structure is shut 01T. The pressure of the well beneath the packer will act to move the ball I4 up against the lowermost end of the mandrel so as to prevent back flow of the cement. At this time it is desirable to wash the cement out of the tubing above the structure. To accomplish this, the pump pressure and fluid is started down through the casing so that the iiuid under pressure will flow downwardly around the tubing and into the ports 40 of the sleeve I5. The pressure will act on the underside of the ring valve 46, moving it upwardly so as to allow the iiuid to flow from the ports 40 through the ports I1. and then past the upper end of the mandrel I I.

It is pointed out that in the usual practice, the well is full of iluid when the device is run into the well, and the mud stream is directed into the casing instead of down through the tubing as is commonly done in drilling. After the tubing has been washed, the pump pressure is again shut off and the device remains in this position until the cement has had suflicient time to harden. It is then desirable to release the structure. The cage I3 at the lowermost end of the mandrel ||fwill be abutting the cement or may be slightly submerged therein; and due to the fact that there is fluid .in the well at the time the device is set and the cement is inserted, there will be fluid between the top of the cement and the underside of the packing 18, so that said pressure must be disposed of, vor relieved before any portion of the device maybe moved downwardly. Obviously, the mandrel I I cannot be moved downwardly as it is abutting the cement.

To relieve this pressure, the tubing (not shown) is lowered, the teeth 3| on the sleeve I5 snap through the nut sections .59, and as the sleeve is moved downwardly, due to the reduced portion below the nut 34, pressure below the packer may flow through said reduced portion up through the openings in the nut 34, and out through the ports |0| and |02 as shown in Figure 4. This pressure flows through the opening I9 and the annular groove 80 so that the pressure on either side of the packer is equalized. While the pressure is being equalized on either side of the packer, the lower end 31 of the sleeve I5 will be abutting or in contact with the latches 86, moving them outwardly from the mandrel thereby removing their innermost end from the annular recess 89 and unlocking the shoe 12 from said mandrel, thus allowing the shoe to move downwardly. The latches 86, engaging within the groove 89, prevent the mandrel from being pumped upwardly when the cement is being pumped therethrough.

In order to pump the cement down through the structure and unseat the ball valve I4, the pump pressure must be greater than the well pressure beneath said ball valve. The pump pressure while acting upon the cement, will also act upon the lower end of the mandrel, and, if the latches 86 were not employed, the mandrel might be pumped up the device so that the uppermost end would strike the shoulder 45 of the coupling 4|. However, the latches 86 prevent this from occurring. By continued downward movement of the sleeve, the nut 34 strikes the shoulder 14 of the shoe 12 and the relief 0f the pressure will allow the packing to resume its original position; and, by the nut striking the shoulder 14, the taper of the ring 96 is pulled out from under said slips so as to retract the same (Fig, 5). The device is now in its released position, and it is only necessary to pull upwardly to retrieve the entire structure. The teeth 3| will not pass through the nut Sections 59, and therefore the device cannot be set.

It is pointed out that the pins 25 of the sleeve I5 are normally engaging within the recess 29 of the mandrel I which locks the sleeve and the mandrel together so that movement of the sleeve also moves the mandrel. However, when the tool is desired to be released, it is necessary to snap the pins outof said recess. Thus, the sleeve may move downwardly relative to the mandrel. The pins are for the purpose of locking the sleeve and the mandrel together while the tool is being set.

In some instances the tool cannot be retrieved due to some condition, such as leaking cement or the like, and it is desirable to release the tubing from said device. If the tool is in the position shown in Figure 2, the clutch means 39 and 5| cannot be engaged due to the fact that the sleeve |=5 cannot be moved downwardly far enough for this to occur. However, the clutch 32 of the sleeve |5 and the clutch 94 of the bushing 94 may be engaged due to the fact that said sleeve may be lowered relative to the shoe 12 until its lower end strikes the latch 86. Thus said sleeve is held from rotating by the engagement of the clutches, and if desired left-hand threads may be provided at the upper end of the collar 4|, and the tubing released from the device by right-hand rotation. However, right-hand threads could be used.

The clutch means 39 and 5| may be employed when the clutches 94 and 32 are not engaged so that the operator may at all times release his tubing from the device. Thus with this structure, the device is released by equalizlng the pressure below the packer and above the packer.

It is pointed out that after the device has been released and it is desirable to move the device down farther, if cement has not been used, or it is desirable to set the device at some point above the cementing operation, this may be accomplished by rotating the suspending pipe, which will rotate the sleeve I5 and allow the threads or teeth 3| thereof to pass through the nut sections aeeaess tt. The device will then resume its original position as shown in Figure l.

l'I'.hus this device enables the operator to set and release this device as many times as desired, and allows him to cement with the structure and hold the pressure on said cement until it has hardened to prevent the cement from blowing back up the well after the packer has been removed. After the cement has hardened, the operator may equalize the pressure on either side of the packer, allowing the packing to resume its original position and enabling the device to be retrieved.

After the device has been released from its set position, the mandrel may be slightly moved up within the device. However, the weight of said mandrel will automatically move it downwardly so that the latches t6 and the spring pins 25 may again engage within their respective recesses.4 However, to insure this movement of the mandrel downwardly, a spring (not shown) may be employed and confined between the upper end of the cage it and the lower end of the cage 9d, thereby insuring that said mandrel will be pulled downwardly so that it will resume its original position as shown in Figure l...

' The hollow mandrel or body i l may be referred to as a conductor. The ring valve dii, and the ports il and lill constitute fluid-pressure responsive means for establishing inward ow of a washing huid. 'The packing assembly, as illustrated, includes primarily the elements lli, l5, llt and mi, while the element Fl forms a part-of the means for supporting the casing engaging slips tb. The element t may also be considered as constituting a support for the clutch means tt, which is adapted to engage with the upwardly directed teeth 3i carried by the tubular member i5. The elements 86, 89 and 90 constitute means for detachably connecting the packing assembly with the conductor il. The elements 19 and 80, and IM and i2 provide passages respectively below and above the packers 18, while the reduced portion 'i3 and recesses in the nut 34 form a by-pass between these passages; however, all of these elements may be referred to as a by-pa'ss. The elements 50, 53 and 6.5 may be referred to as anchor- 111g means.

-said sleeve and engageable by the packing assembly for setting the anchoring means and thereby the packer when the sleeve is moved in an upward direction relative to the packing assembly, a conductor slidably mountedy within the sleeve. cooperating means carried by the sleeve and conductor to prevent relative sliding movement therebetween in one direction while permit.

ting such movement therebetween in the opposite direction, and means for detachably connecting the packing assembly and conductor together to prevent upward movement of the latter, said last-named means' being operable by the sleeve to disconnect the packing assembly from the conductor when the sleeve is moved in a downward direction relative to the conductor to thereby release the packer.

2. A device in accordance with claim 1, wherein there is a back pressure valve carried by the conductor for closing ofi upward :flow of fluid therethrough.

3. A device in accordance with claim 1, wherein there is a fluid by-pass passage through the sleeve and conductor, and a pressure actuated valve normally biased to a position to prevent passage of fluid through said by-pass passage and operable to permit inward flow.

d. A device in accordance with claim 1, wherein there is a uid by-pass passage around the packing assembly and formed in. the. latter and the sleeve, said passage being normally closed when the packer is set and being opened to permit the passage of fluid therethrough so as to equalize the iluid pressure on both sides of the packer when the sleeve is moved in a downward directionrelative to the conductor to disconnect the packing assembly from the conductor and to thereafter release the packer.

5. A device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the means for detachably connecting the packing assembly and conductor include arms having one oi their ends pivoted to the packing assembly and extending below said sleeve and across the path of downward movement of the sleeve relative to the conductor and having their opposite free ends seating within an external circumferential groove formed in the conductor.

6. A device in accordance wtihA claim 1, wherein thereare cooperating means provided on the sleeve and on the anchoring means detachably engageable for supporting the anchoring means in retracted position with respect to the casing wall and the packing assembly.

.7. A device in accordance with claim 1, wherein there are cooperating clutch means provided on the sleeve and on the anchoring means operable when engaged to hold the sleeve against rotation so as to permit the support to be released from the` sleeve.

8. A device of the character described including, a sleeve member, a packing assembly surrounding -the sleeve member and movable with respect thereto, anchoring means carried by the sleeve member, means carried by the anchoring means frictionally engaging a well casing, means carried by the packing assembly for actuating the anchoring means, annular projections on the sleeve, and spring-pressed nuts carried bythe anchoring means having' recesses receiving the projections of the sleeve and movable to permit the projections to Amove longitudinally thereof when the sleeve is moved in one direction.

GEORGE n JUSTICE. FRANK M. THURSTON. FURMAN N. YOUNG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2498791 *Jun 22, 1946Feb 28, 1950Clark James MWell device
US2547387 *Oct 6, 1945Apr 3, 1951George GreenWell packer
US2555647 *Jun 15, 1946Jun 5, 1951Baker Oil Tools IncPacking flow preventing device
US2589656 *Jun 19, 1950Mar 18, 1952Ellis B ArmstrongWell packer with expandible seals
US2633201 *Jun 7, 1948Mar 31, 1953Halliburton Oil Well CementingCementing device
US2753943 *Jun 27, 1952Jul 10, 1956Lane Wells CoControl device for well tools
US2765853 *Apr 7, 1952Oct 9, 1956Brown Cicero CWell packer
US2784789 *Dec 24, 1951Mar 12, 1957Continental Assurance CompanyWell packer
US2998077 *Dec 23, 1957Aug 29, 1961Baker Oil Tools IncSubsurface safety shut-off valve apparatus
US3089543 *Oct 29, 1958May 14, 1963Otis Eng CoWell casing suspending means
US3139141 *Oct 8, 1962Jun 30, 1964Otis Eng CoPipe hangers for wells
US3244233 *Apr 4, 1963Apr 5, 1966Halliburton CoRetrievable bridge plug
US3361207 *Sep 4, 1964Jan 2, 1968Baker Oil Tools IncRetrievable subsurface well tools
US3374839 *Apr 4, 1966Mar 26, 1968Schlumberger Technology CorpWell packer apparatus
US3935903 *Apr 2, 1975Feb 3, 1976Otis Engineering CorporationWell tubing protective fluid injection system
US4524825 *Dec 1, 1983Jun 25, 1985Halliburton CompanyWell packer
US20090294119 *May 28, 2009Dec 3, 2009Red Spider Technology LimitedLarge bore packer
USRE28641 *Aug 7, 1974Dec 9, 1975 Retrievable subsurface well tools
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/126, 166/237, 166/151, 166/131, 166/130, 166/140, 166/150
International ClassificationE21B33/134
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/134
European ClassificationE21B33/134