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Publication numberUS2390367 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1945
Filing dateAug 7, 1944
Priority dateAug 7, 1944
Publication numberUS 2390367 A, US 2390367A, US-A-2390367, US2390367 A, US2390367A
InventorsHennessy James J
Original AssigneeHennessy James J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Journal lubricator structure
US 2390367 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 4, 1945.

J. J. HENNESSY JOURNAL LUBRI CATOR S TRUGTURE Filed Aug. 7, 1944 INVENTOR- I F JAME S J. HENNESSY IG.4. IZ QM AT may.-

Patented Dec. 4, 1945 UNITED STATES-PATENT OFFICE JOURNAL LUBRICATOR STRUCTURE J ames J. Hennessy, Montclair, N. J.

. Application August '7, 1944, Serial No. 548,395

7 Claims.

The invention relates to lubricators for railway axle boxes such as are illustrated and described, for example, in Patent No. 2,123,946, issued to the present applicant July 19, 1938, and the invention consists in novel lubricant distributing structure and associated parts. The present application is a. continuation in part of an earlier application filed July 3, 1943, Serial No. 493,401.

One object of the invention is to facilitate the action of a lubricator pump when operation is initiated under conditions in which the lubricant is cold and its fluidity is low.

Another object is to hold the distributor and a pump body with which it is movably associated against undue relative movement and thereby prevent pounding of the distributor against the journal by the tendency of the pump to hammer the distributor when the vehicle is moving over rough track.

Another object is to adequately support the journal, and the wheels carried thereby, on the pump and on the bottom of the axle box when the axle box or the frame part in which it is mounted are jacked up for removal of wheels and axles, springs, etc.

Another object is to facilitate the accurate assembly of the lubricant pump and distributor units beneath the journal where they are manipulated without benefit of unobstructed vision.

These and other detail objects as will appear from the following description are attained by the structure illustrated in the accompanying drawing embodying a selected form of the invention, in which-- Figure 1 is a longitudinal section through a lubricator embodying the invention with parts of an axle journal, wheel and associated structure showninpart.

Figures 2 and 3 are vertical transverse sections taken on the lines 2-2 and 3-3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a longitudinal vertical section through a structure similar to that shown in Figures 1-3 but illustrating another form of the invention.

The axle is indicated at A and is provided with a journal portion indicated at J to which the lubricator is applied. A driver is mounted upon the end of the axle, the driver hub being shown at D. The lubricator is mounted in a sheet metal cellar which includes a sump 5 and is supported by a plate 2 mounted on bushings 3 clamped between opposing ears 4, depending from the side walls of the axle box B, by bolts 5. The lubricator includes a pump having a rigid body portion 6 and provided with cylinders I in which are per, brass or silver.

pistons 8 actuated through levers 9 by contact rods Ill projecting through the outer end of the box for contact with the wheel hub D which plays back and forth longitudinally of the journal relative to the driving box and pump in a manner as described, for example, in the above-mentioned patent.

A distributor H is yieldingly supported on pump body 6 by springs l2 and includes a pan-like member I3 of sheet metal in which is mounted a quantity of yieldin fibrous material [4 as, for example, a plurality of layers of felt, the upper edges of which are cut to form a concave surface I5 arranged to fit against the surface of the journal J. Intakes [6 lead from the .lower portion of sump 5 to cylinders I, and passageways l'l lead from cylinders l to an upright telescoping conduit [8 extending through the central portion of the distributor and having an upper rim which may be thrust against the bottom of the journal. The above-described structure does not in itself constitute the present invention.

Imbedded in the mass M of fibrous material are bars 20 and 30 of rigid material, preferably a metal highly conductive of heat, such as cop- The upper end of each bar is substantially flush with upper'face I5 of material l4 and is similarly concave for contact with the journal. The lower end of bar 20 extends downwardly below the bottom of distributor H into the lubricant contained in sump 5, the normal level of which is indicated at L. A collar 2|, brazed 'or otherwise secured to the bottom of pan I3, is apertured for a pin 22 which also passes through bar 20 and holds the latter in assembled relation with the distributor.

Preferably, a small space is provided between pump body 5 and bar 20 to accommodate variations in the box and lubricator construction so that the bar will not be wedged against the journal when initially installed. Spring l2 maintains contact betwen the upper faces of the distributor material l4 and bar 20 with the journal irrespective of wear and variations in the distance between the journal and the floor of the sump. When the vehicle is travelling over rail joints, frogs, or other rough track, there will be a tendency for the pump to jump upwardly or. for the distributor to jump downwardly from their normal positions in contact with the pump body and journal respectively. This tendency is yieldingly resisted by spring l2 and positively limited by the engagement of bar 20 with pump body 6 before either member has acquired sufficient momentum to injure any of the parts.

The lower end of bar 30 extends downwardly through an aperture 33 provided therefor in the pump body 6 and terminates a short distance above the bottom of the cellar sump on which the pump rests. The lower end of bar 30 and the bottom of the sump are normally spaced apart and will coact similarly to the lower end of bar 20 and the top of the pump body to accommodate variations in the initial distance between the sump and the journaland to limit relative vertical movements of the journal and pump parts. The bar will be supported from distributor l3 by a, collar 3! and a pin 32 corresponding to the collar and pin previously described in connection with bar 2D.

When the pump and distributor are assembled and inserted beneath the journal, the interengagement of bar 30 and the pump body will securely position these parts longitudinally of the pump and maintain the mounting of the lower end of the distributor conduit It in the seat provided therefor in the pump body.

During normal operation of the vehicle, there is sufiicient heat resulting from the contact of the journal with its bearing 3 and, to a lesser degree, with the distributor, to maintain the lubricant suiiiciently fluid to be pumped in ade quate quantities to th journal surface. When the vehicle stands for a substantiaI period during low temperatures, the lubricant tends to con- What is claimed is:

1. In a railway lubricant, a pump including a rigid body sup ported on the floor of said sump, a spring supported distributor spaced upwardly from the pump body and including a mass of yielding material with an upper face of substantial area concaved for application to a journal with which the lubricator is assembled, a conduit leading from said pump upwardly through the central portion of said distributor to the upper face thereof, and a plurality of vertically disposed bars of relatively rigid material extending through the distributor at opposite sides of said conduit and having their upper ends substantially flush with the upper face of the distributor, said bars projecting downwardly below the bottom of the distributor into close proximity to the upper face of said pump body and positively limiting the movement of the distributor and pump body towards each other.

2. In a railway journal lubricator, a sump for lubricant, a pump including a rigid body supported on the door of said sump, a spring :supported distributor spaced upwardly .from the pump body and including a mass of yielding fibrous material with an upper face of substantial area concaved for application to a journal with which the lubricator is assembled, a conduit leadgeal and it may require considerable time after operation is begun before the lubricant is sufficiently fluid to flow freely through the pump to the journal. This time will be shortened by use of bars 211 and 30 which readily conduct heat from the journal to th lubricant. Hence the likelihood of scoring the journal or it bearing by lack of lubricant is lessened. 1

If the weight of the vehicle frame and its load is removed, as when the frame is jacked up or hoisted by a crane to provide access to its running gear, springs and the like, the axles and wheels will be supported temporarily through bars and 30, pump body 6, cellar sump 5, plate 2, bushings 3 and the axle box. This will avoid crushing of the softer portion of the distributor and when the parts are returned to normal position efiective contact between the distributor pads 54 and the journal will be maintained.

Preferably, the pump body has depending elements 19 which raise the major portion ,of the bottom of the body above the floor of the sump and provide for the flow of lubricant through intakes 16. Bar extends through the pump body into this part of the lubricant and thereby may heat the lubricant being drawn into the pump more eiTectively than does bar 20 which terminates above the top of the pump body.

Figure 4 illustrates another arrangement in which both bars 49 imbedded in the lubricant distributing fibrous material 4| terminate just above the top face of the pump body 42 and are assembled with the distributor and function the same as the bar 20 previously described. Ob-

viously, both bars could be extended through the pump similarly to the arrangement of bar 30 previously described.

It will be understood that the materials used in the distributor and the number and position of bars 25, 30 and and other details of the construction may be varied substantially without departing from the spirit of the invention, and the exclusive use of those modifications coming within the scope of the claims is contemplated.

ing from said pump upwardly through the central portion of said distributor to the upper face thereof, and a plurality of vertically disposed-barsv of metal of relatively high heat conductivity extending through the distributor at opposite sides of said conduit and having their upper ends substantially flush with the upper face of' the distributor,

said bars projecting ,downwardly below the bottom of the distributor into close proximity to the upper face of said pump body and pqsitivelylimiting the movement of the distributorand pump body towards each other and conducting heat resulting from friction between the journaland its bearing to lubricant in the sump.

3. A railway journal distributor comprising a mass of relatively low heat transmitting material having a concave upper surface for engaging a journal with which the lubricator is assembled and adapted to apply lubricant over the engaged surface, and a member of relatively high heat conducting material imbedded in said mass and having an upper end similarly concaved to fit against the'surface of the journal, said member extending through said mass to project downwardly therefrom into a quantity of lubricant and to transmit heat resulting from friction. between the journal and its bearing to the lubricantto facilitate pumping of the latter.

4. In a railway journal lubricator, a lubricant sump, an elevated distributor of relatively'low heat conductivity having a journal engaging face elevated above the normal level of lubricant in the sump, a pump for elevating lubricant from the sump to the distributor and including a body mounted in the sump, there being a member of relatively high heat conductivity in the distributor with its upper end substantially flush with said face, and adapted to contact with the journal to which the lubricator is appliedand extending downwardly through the distributor and the pumpb-ody into lubricant in the sump.

5. In a railway journal lubricator, a sump for lubricant, a pump including a rigid body supported on the floor of said sump, a spring supported distributor spaced upwardly from the pumpfbody and including a mass of yielding material withan journal lubricator, a sump forupper face of substantial area concaved for application to a journal with which the lubricator is assembled, a conduit leading from said pump upwardly through the central portion of said distributor to the upper face thereof, and a plurality of vertically disposed bars of relatively rigid material extending through the distributor at op- I posite sides of said conduit and having their upper ends substantially flush with the upper face of the distributor, said bars projecting downwardly below the bottom of the distributor, one of said bars terminating in close proximity to the upper face of said pump body and another of said bars extending through the pump body and terminating in close proximity to the floor of the sump,

substantially flush with said face, and adapted to contact with the journal to Which the lubricator is applied, and extending downwardly through the distributor and the pump body with its lower end in the lubricant below the raised bottom portion of the pump body.

7. In a railway journal lubricator, a sump for lubricant, a pump including a rigid body supported on the floor of said sump, a spring supported distributor spaced upwardly from the pump body and including a mass of yielding material with an upper face of substantial area concaved for application to a journal with which the lubricator is assembled, a conduit leading from said pump upwardly through the central portion of said distributor to the upper face thereof, and a vertically disposed bar of relatively rigid material extending through the distributor at one side of said conduit and having its upper end substantially fiush with the upper face of the distributor, said bar projecting downwardly below the bottom of the distributor into close proximity to the upper face of said pump body and positively limiting the movement of the distributor and pump body towards each other.

JAS. J. HENNESSY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4306384 *Apr 11, 1980Dec 22, 1981Al HyzPrecision machine tool workpiece positioning apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification384/169
International ClassificationB61F17/00, B61F17/24
Cooperative ClassificationB61F17/24
European ClassificationB61F17/24