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Publication numberUS2390565 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1945
Filing dateSep 29, 1942
Priority dateSep 29, 1942
Publication numberUS 2390565 A, US 2390565A, US-A-2390565, US2390565 A, US2390565A
InventorsDaniel Topjian
Original AssigneeDaniel Topjian
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Garment protector
US 2390565 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. TOPJIAN GARMENT PROTECTOR Filed Sept. 29, 1942 Patented Dec. 11, 1945 Daniel Topjlan, Water-town, Mass assignor, by mesne assignments, to himself, as trustee Application September 29, 1942, Serial No. 460,073

6 Claims. (Cl. 2-53) V 'I'his invention relates to apparel and more especially to means for protecting garments from the injurious eflfects of perspiration and to prevent the unpleasant odors which usually deapply, either directly to the skin or to the gar-.

ment of the wearer, various deodorizing or peri'uming substances designed to suppressor overpowerthe perspiration odor, and while to. a certain extent efiective; such a procedure has little appeal to the really fastidious person.

Among the objects of the present invention are to provide a garment protecting means of imvelop when perspiration is absorbed by articles 5 proved type comprising a perspiration-absorbing of apparel. While in its broader aspects the inelement which is so cheap and easily replaceable vention is useful in connection'with other garas to make it reasonably certain that the user ments it is here illustrated and described, by way will discard it before it becomes inefiective for or examplebut without-limiting intent, as emits in en e p rpo e; to p vi a replaceable bodied in a dress shield of the general 'type cusabsorbing element of ample capacity (-which may tomarily located at the armpit portion of a dress. be supplied to the use n units of difierent ea- Commonly dress shields are merely layers of paeity if desired); to p v a garment P absorbent material sometimes combined with a for spec fic example'a d e Shield. eempl'islayer or layers of waterproof or moisture-resisting a compartment or compartments for the reant material and are intended by absorption of 16 ception of such an absorbent element and so deor resistance to the penetration of moisture, or signed that the walls of such compartment will both, to prevent perspiration from moistening, not themselves become per a W th persp discoloring or imparting an unpleasant odor to t en e en durin a long pe od Of to Provide the material of the dress itself. a replaceable absorbent element containing a While perspiration is a very dilute fluid, it does 20 substance capable f ppo in any tendency f contain about 1% of solids including sodium' the absorbed per p at in Particular the fate chloride, nitrogeneous compounds, fats, fatty d f ty constituents o t e p sp a o to acids, stearates, lymphoidal cells, cellular nuclei come disagreeably oderif r b Which is and cellular debris. Among the chemical subseparated from the skin and from th material stances recognized in human perspiration are 0f the ar ent itself t at t ca ot ca se ju y acetic, propionic, caproic, caprylic, butyric, lactic to either; and to pro de at p tect de and ascorbic acids and traces of uric acid. having means whereby it may r v y be Normally, as secreted. perspiration has a slight I cured to a garment, thereby reliably to hold it though not necessarily unpleasant odor, but when n pr r p s t n W l at th sam t m t p rexposed to moisture and warmth the various resimit its ready removal for replacement of the due materials and especially the fats, fatty acids, p t -a e t e e en s. etc., undergo decomposition and chemical Other and further objec n a vant es of changes, often resulting in a very offensive odor. the invention W e Pointed O t in t e O Under some pathological conditions the perspirame mor d ta d description nd by ref r n e to tion, even when first secreted, may have a dis- 5 t e c mp ny n d w w e n agreeable odor. Fig. 1 is a perspective view showing the outside Various preparations have been proposed for 01' the shield as it is actually used and showing, reducing the amount ofperspir'ation secreted. in enlarged d a a m t elevation. a ype of Usually such preparations are of an astringent fabric Which is desirable r use as the Outer nature, compounds of aluminum being common- 40 e e t o the S e d; ly employed, but such substances, if used habitu- Fig- 2 is a view similar to Fi -'1 but Sh w t e ally, are believed to exert a harmful effect, and s ield i si out, a portion of inner w ll of many of these compounds are injurious to cloththe shield being broken away t indieate the lug. absorbent filler member;

On-the otherhand, it has been proposed to 46 Fig. 3 is a section, substantially on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1, to somewhat larger scale;

Fig. 4 is an elevation, with certain parts broken awayQillustrating a composite filler leaf or pad useful with the improved shield;

Fig. 5 is a similar elevation of a simple, multiply filler leaf or pad of different construction;

Fig. 6 is a section on line 5-6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary edge elevation to large scale of the filler leaf of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary section, to small scale, showing how the improved shield may be applied to the arm-scye of a garment;

Fig. 8 is an inside elevation of a pad holder of modified form; and

Fig. 9 is an elevation of a removable pad for use with the holder of Fig. 8.

Referring to the drawing, the improved shield of the present invention, as illustrated in Fig. 1, comprises a holder including a pair of similar more or less lune-shaped wings I and 2 hinged together along their concave edges 3. These wings are of multi-ply construction, each wing having an interior pocket for the reception of a removable, leaf-like absorbent pad hereinafter more fully described.

Referring to Fig. 3, the wings I and 2 are shown as comprising the outer members 4 and 4 respectively, said outer members being of flexible material, for example a textile fabric, and preferably of a more or less loose or open mesh so as to make them readily pervious to moisture.

Thus, as illustrated at E, (Fig. 1) this outer ply or layer may consist of fabric knitted in the socalled eyelet pattern, a construction which provides a soft, flexible and thin material having definite openings of more or less rectangular contour. While this is a desirable type of fabric, other materials such as net fabrics or the like may be employed, and, in fact, any soft, flexible and thin material provided with pores, apertures or perforations is acceptable for the purpose even including sheet rubber (when available) provided with a multitude'of small perforations. If textile material be employed, it is desirable to treat it in such a way as to make the material itself substantially non-absorbent of moisture if by reason of its actual characteristics it is non-absorbent. Rayon fabrics untreated may be satisfactory for the purpose since they do not readily absorb moisture into their fibrous structure, but fabrics of cotton or the like should be so prepared as to waterproof their constituent yarns, as by coating or preferably impregnation with some 'of the well knowmwaterproofing compounds such, for example, as are used in making rainproof or rain-resistant fabrics.

Each of the wings I and 2 also comprises an inner member 5 and 5, respectively, said inner v 4' are permanently and flexibly united by a sewed seam at 5. The members 4 and 5 of the wing I are united by marginal stitches I, while the members 4 and 5 of the wing 2 are united by marginal stitches 8, it being noted, however, that the upper edges I I and I I of the members 5 and ii are left free, thus providing entrances to the spaces or pockets I and I0, respectively, betwgeisi the members 4 and and the members 4 an Closure flaps l2 and I2, also of moisture-impervious material, are attached at their upper edges, preferably by the same sewing stitches 6 which unite the members 4 and 4. edges of these impervious closure fiaps I2 and I2 depend freely into the upper portions of the pockets I0 and I0, forming in effect continuations of the inner walls 5 811C159 of the pockets above the points II and II and terminating at the points I3 and I3, respectively, at a substan tial distance below the edges II- and II.

The pockets I0 and III are designed removably to hold absorbent pads I4 and I4, respectively, said pads being thin, flexible and leaf-like in general character. When installed in the respective pockets, these pads project up beyond the lower edges I3 and I3 of the closure flaps, the lower portions of the flaps thus being interposed between the filler pads and the inner walls 5 and 5 of the respective wings. As previously made, most dress shields have been inadequate to absorb the perspiration completely, with the resuit that lingerie and dress fabrics, from repeated wettings, are permanently discolored and weakened so that garments, otherwise capable of much longer wear, must be discarded by reason of such under arm damage. In accordance with the present invention, it is proposed to provide removable absorbent pads of different capacity to meet the needs of each individual user, but all equally applicable to the shield device herein disclosed.

As illustrated in Fig. 4, the fillerpad or leaf I4 consists of two outer plies I5 of thin, porous reinforce material, for example cheesecloth, having interposed between them a layer I6 of absorbent material which is held securely in place by stitches II which unite the plies l5 along their edges. The absorbent layer l6 may be of any suitable character, for example other plies of the same material as the outer plies; a layer of cot-' for making paper diapers or similar absorbent articles, being sufiiciently shape-retentive to hold its shape without reinforcement when disposed in the pockets of the shield. Whether the pad be like that of Fig. 4 or Fig. 5, the absorbent layer may be of as many plies as desired to provide the requisite moisture-absorbent capacity,,

and these pads may be supplied to the tradehaving two, four, eight or more absorbent plies.

As illustrated in Fig. 6, the filler pad, whether of the type illustrated in Fig. 4 or in Fig. 5, is preferably impregnated with a, substance which tends to inhibit bacteriological or chemical change in .the solid residue of the perspiration (particularly the fatty substances) which is absorbed by the pad. By the employment of such a substance, it is unnecessary to interfere with the free secretion of perspiration or, on the other hand, to try to conceal the disagreeable odor of perspiration by some overpowering perfume, since bythis procedure the development of unpleasant odor is largely prevented. At the same time the material employed for inhibiting the development The lower skin so that it is not liable to cause irritation to the skin and is wholly separated from the fabric of the garment so that there is no danger. of

discoloration: or other inJury to the garment.

Among the materials which may be employed for impregnating the flller pad are 2,2'-dihydroxy 3,5,6,3',5',6'-hexachloro diphenyl methane, or benzoic acid compounded with sodium benzoate and boric acid. Obviously, if desired. some faint and delicate perfume may be incorporated, merely to impart a pleasant fragrance.

A flller pad, designed and treated as above described is antiseptic and odor inhibiting and may be depended upon to absorb a very substantial quantity of the solids from perspiration before it loses its efliciency. However, when it has been used for so long a period as to have become clogged with deposited solids, it is very easily removed from the shield merely by pulling out the free edge of the closure flap from behind the upper edge II or II' of the inner walls of the wings, thus giving access to the pad which may be removed and replaced by a fresh pad. Since these pads may be made very cheaply, it iscontemplated that they will be changed as frequently as may be desired and before through acid operative to inhibit the evolution of disagreeable odors from absorbed perspiration.

2. A protective shield for main the arm-scye of a garment, said shield comprising a pair of substantially lune-shaped wings flexibly united along their concavely curved edges, each. wing being constructed and arranged to constitute a pocket for the reception of a removable leaf-like pad of absorbent material, each wing having an inner wall of a material which is resistant to the passage of moisture and an outer wall of soft,

flexible pervious material which has little or no capacity for absorbing moisture, means uniting the inner and outer walls along their outer edges, the inner wall of each wing comprising parts having juxtaposed relatively movable free edges which are separable thereby to provide access to the respective pockets.

3. A protective shield for use in the arm-scye of a garment, said shield comprising a pair of substantially lune-shaped wings flexibly united along their concavely curved edges, each wing being constructed and arranged to constitute a pocket for the reception of a removable absorbent pad, each wing having an inner wall of a material which is resistant to the passage of moisture and an outer wall of pervious but nonuse they have become ineffective as absorbent elements.

In order to facilitate the application of this shield to the arm-scye of a garment, it is proposed to provide the inner walls 5 and 5" with fastener elements It, for instance the socket elements of snap fasteners, with the understanding that the complemental elements will be applied to the lining of the sleeve and garment as indicated in Fig. 7.

In the modified arrangement of Figs. 8 and 9, the moisture-resistant holder portion of the shield comprises two wings 2| and 22 (each of moisture-impervious material and which may be single ply if desired) connected at 23, and designed to be permanently secured to the garment. The removable pad 24 may be similar in construction to the pads above described, but is preferably of a contour similar to that of the holder 2. Complemental snap fastener elements 28 and 28' on the holder and pad respectively removably unite the pad to the outer side of the holder.

While certain desirable embodiments of the invention have been indicated by way of example, it is to be understood that the invention is not necessarily limited to these precise embodiments but is to be regarded as broadly inclusive of any and all modifications within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim: i

1. A protective shie d for use inthe arm-scye of a garment, said shield comprising a pair of substantially lune-shaped wings flexibly united along their concavely curved edges, each wing being constructed and arranged to constitute a pocket for the reception of a removable absorbent pad, each wing having an inner wall of "a maabsorbent textile material, the inner wall of each pocket comprising overlapping free portions to aiford access to the pocket, each pocket being designed to receive a leaf-like pad of absorbent material of a contour generally similar to that of the wing, and a fastener element exposed at the lower part of the inner wall of each wing and designed for engagement with a complemental fastener element secured to the garment.

terial which is resistant to the passage of mois- 4. A dress shield comprising a pair of substantially like wings and means permanently and flexibly uniting said wings along their upper edges, each wing including an outer body-contacting wall of open mesh textile fabric made from water-impervious yarns and an inner garment-contacting wall of a material which is impervious to and non-absorbent of moisture, the inner wall of each wing comprising lower and upper parts, the upper edge of the lower part and the lower edge of the upper part being free but normally overlapping, and a thin, flexible removable flller pad of substantially uniform thickness and of bibulous material interposed between the inner and outer walls of each wing, said filler pads being removable at will by withdrawing them from between the normally overlapped free edges of the upper and lower portions of the inner wall of the wing.

5. A dress shield comprising a pair of substantially like wings and a sewed seam permanently uniting said wings along their upper edges, each wing including an outer wall and an inner wall, means permanently uniting the outer and inner walls of each individual wing along the side and bottom edges of the respective wing, the outer wall of each wing being moisture-pervious but substantiallynon-absorbent of moisture and the inner wall of each wing being impervious and non-absorbent, theinner wall of each wing comprising lower and upper'portions, the upper edge of the upper portion of the inner wall being anchored by the seam which unites the wings and the lower edge of the upper portion of the inner wall being free and normally overlapping the oi! the upper and lower portions of the inner wall of the wing, and a removable leaf-like pad 01 bibulous material normally disposed in each pocket.

6. A protective shield for use in the arm-scye of a garment, said shield comprising a pair of substantially lune-shaped wings flexibly united along their c'oncavely curved edges, each wing being constructed and arranged to constitute a pocket for the reception of a removable absorbent pad, each wing having an inner wall 0! a material which is resistant to the passage of moisture and an outer wall of open mesh textile

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2434830 *Jul 21, 1945Jan 20, 1948Martin BillinsDiscardable and deodorizing garment shield
US2442008 *Nov 2, 1944May 25, 1948Irving RothenbergShoulder pad and method of fabricating the same
US2544403 *Dec 17, 1947Mar 6, 1951Morris TurnerCrotch protector for trousers
US2556231 *Jun 25, 1949Jun 12, 1951Stephens Priscilla MDress shield
US2838758 *Jan 5, 1955Jun 17, 1958Townley Bernard RProtective device
US5042088 *Nov 27, 1989Aug 27, 1991Kimberly-Clark CorporationDisposable clothing shield and method of manufacture
US7730551 *Dec 12, 2008Jun 8, 2010Price Jason AndrewUnderarm garment protector
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/53
International ClassificationA41D27/00, A41D27/13
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/13
European ClassificationA41D27/13