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Publication numberUS2392038 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1946
Filing dateJan 18, 1943
Priority dateJan 18, 1943
Publication numberUS 2392038 A, US 2392038A, US-A-2392038, US2392038 A, US2392038A
InventorsAsa K Gaylord
Original AssigneeAsa K Gaylord
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ventilator unit
US 2392038 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 1, 1946. A. K. GAYLORD 2,392,038

VENTILATOR UNIT griginal Filed Nov. 24, 1939 m z/E/v 777R Patented Jan. 1, 1946 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

November 24, 1939.

This application January 18, 1943, Serial No. 472,720

7 Claims.

This invention relates to. ventilators for collecting and removing smoke, gases, vapors, fumes and the like which commonly ascend from cooking ranges, and has particular reference to a method of and apparatus for collecting for convenient disposal the grease and similar substances which may ascend from the cooking surface in the form of vapor.

The object in general of'the present invention is to provide a ventilator unit having means for collecting for convenient disposal the products of condensation from gases flowing therethrough.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for collecting for convenient disposal the grease and similar substances which may be separated from the gases in a ventilator unit so as to require periodic removal of such collected substances. In particular, the object of the invention is to collect the products of condensation in such a manner that the accumulation thereof will tend to obstruct the flow of air through the ventilator unit if such accumulation is not periodically removed.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds with reference to the accompanying drawing, it :being understood that the drawing is illustrative only and that various changes and modifications may be resorted to without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention; and I deem myself entitled to all such changes and modifications as fall within the scope of the claims hereto appended.

In the drawing: Figure 1 is a perspective view of a cooking range and ventilator unit embodying the principles of the present invention; Figure 2 is a. vertical section taken on the line 2-2 of Figure 1; Figure 3 is a side elevation, partly in section, of a cooking range and ventilator unit illustrating a modified form of construction embodying the principles of the invention; Figure 4 is a front elevation of the apparatusillustrated in Figure 3; and Figure 5 is a fragmentary detail ,in section illustrating an adaptation of the concooking surface 2 to form an, enclosure with the back plate 3.

A hood or shelf 5 is mounted above the rear portion of the cooking surface, which may form 5 the bottom of an oven or warming oven 6 as shown in Figure 2. The hood or shelf 5 is supported at its ends by the end plates 4, 4. A front plate 1 extends upwardly from the rear edge of the shelf 5, this front plate I having a changing contour and merging into the back plate 3 so as to provide a union with the vent pipe 8. The lower portion of the front plate 1 is provided with a removable cleanout door 9 extending substantially the width of the ventilator. The walls 3 and 1 thereby form a duct means defining a ven-' tilation passageway l0 through which air may be drawn at high velocity by a fan I located at any convenient point in the vent pipe 8. Attached to the walls 3 and l and projecting into the passageway substantially the full width thereof are a plurality of collecting plates or baiiies l3. Figure 2 illustrates one of said baflies H as bein mounted on said removable door 9. Removal of said door and said one baille exposes the surfaces of all of said baflies for cleaning purposes.

An intake opening ll having a width substantially equal to the length of the cooking surface 2 admits air into the lower portion of the passageway III. A lower wall portion of the duct 30 means adjacent the. intake opening II of the passageway is so formed as to define a trough l2 which is substantially coextensive with the intake opening II and hence also substantially equal to the length of the cooking surface 2 of 85 the range. The trough I2 is so arranged as to accumulate therein the products of condensation separated from the air flow passing through the ventilator unit. The lowermost baifle l3 extends downwardly from the upper wall of the duct means 4 opposite the trough l2 and defines in part the intake end of the passageway Ill, and cooperates with the trough l2 to govern the effective size of the intake opening or slot II. The lower edge of this baille terminates substantially over the bottom of the trough, and at the approximate elevationloi' its forward edge or rim, which forms the lower margin of the slot II. The other baffles I 3 are disposed alternately on the plates 3 and l in staggered relationship, as illustrated in Figure 2. These baiiies maybe constructed of sheet metal in such a manner that they are inclined downwardly in the'passageway, and may be set at the desired angle at the time of installation. It is not necessary to the presentinvention that the baiiies, except the lowermost 2 aaaaosa baffle, take this form, however, as they may pro- Ject out horizontally from the plates 3 and 1 or they may be of any other convenient form which will satisfactorily perform the functions pres-. ently to be described.

The invention resides further in the provision for the collection of grease and other products of condensation which are separated from the gases flowing through the ventilator unit in a receptacleso arranged that such products of condensation may conveniently be removed with a minimum of time and effort. Referring particularly to Figures 1 and 2, the invention is embodied in the. trough l2 together with the grease collecting bailies l3, particular attention being directed to the cooperation of the lower baiiie l3 with the trough I2. The manner in which the separation of products of condensation is efiected with the ventilator unit of the invention may be described as follows. When the fan i4 is in operation air will be drawn from above the cooking surface 2 and through the intake open ng or slot ii at a relatively high velocity. The lower baille l3 will first direct this air stream downwardly under the depending edge of said baille to cause grease particles contained therein to lodge within the trough l2, whereupon the air stream is deflected upwardly against the second bailie I 3. From there on the alternately arranged baliies l3 will repeatedly reverse the d rection of the air flow as it passes around the bailies on its way to the vent pipe 8. Globules of grease and other condensed products will tend to be thrown out of said air stream by the action of centrifu al force upon each of these sharp reversals of direction of flow. a considerable portion of these condensed products being se arated in passing around the first or lower baffle i3. Part cles not removed in the first stage will be thrown out of the air stream and upon t e surfaces of the plates 3 and I and the baffles is as the air stream proceeds on its devious upward path.

In the above described arrangement, in which the lower baffle i 3 extends substantially into the trou h i2. it will be seen that accumulations in the bottom of the tro h i 2 will obstruct the air flow th ough t e ventilator unit. The wall port on of the duct means formi t e trou h l2 and the op os te wall ortion defining the bailie depending do nwardly into t e trou h. the lower edge of which is substantially uni ormly s aced from the bottom of the t ou h, thus cooperate to form a tra in the ventilation assageway. If the acc mulations are not p riodical y removed they will rise to a level substantiallv in contact w th t e lower e e of the lower b f e 13. which condit on seals the passageway against the intake of air. Even bef re the accum lation actuallv sea s the passaeewav, the air flow will he so I materi l v reduced t t the venti ator unit will be of the shelf iii, the back plate i9 is bent downwardly to form a downward extension I in which forms the front wall of a passageway 20. The

rear wall of the passageway 23 is formed by a plate 2i which Joins the rear edge of the shelf l3. The walls Isa and 2i are Joined by end pieces and together form the passageway 23 similar to the passageway ID in Figures 1 and 2 except that it is inverted. Entrance to the passageway 23 is through a slot 23 defined by the rear edge of the shelf I 8 and the uppermost portion of the back plate I. The slot 23 may preferabl be of the same length as the cooking surface, the width of the passageway 20 diminishing in proportion, as the walls thereof approach the upper end of the vent pipe 36.

The vent pipe 25 extends downwardly through the floor 26 and then passes under the floor until it turns upward at any convenient outlet provided in the building. A fan 38 may be installed in the vent pipe 25 at any convenient location, to create a high velocity current of entering air through the slot 23. Preferably, that portion of the vent pipe lying beneath the floor is sloped slightly from horizontal, with its lowest point at the junction of the horizontal section of the pipe with the vertical section which connects with the range. Through inattention and neglect, the horizontal section of the pipe lying beneath the door is likely to become filled with greasy accumulations, the weight of which would rupture the pipe joints and cause leaks through which a highly inflammable. greasy soot can escape to cover surrounding surfaces. Even should this not occur, the accumulated products of condensation in the pipe constitute a very real fire hazard; since these are easily ignited and burn with an intense heat. To compel the removal of such accumulations applicant provides a trap 21- intermediate the vertical section of the pipe and the pipe lying beneath the floor, in which unremoved accumulations of the products of condensation will form a seal to prevent the passage of smoke and other gases to be exhausted from the cooking surface. Thus, if the accumulations of grease and the like he not periodically removed, as by means of the drain valve 28, the trap. will tend to fill up and obstruct the vent pipe 25 against the further passage of smoke and other gases until such time as the trap is emptied.

In Figure 5 is illustrated an adaptation of the construction illustrated in Figure 3, the construction illustrated comprising a back plate 29 and a front plate 30 which form an enclosure for an upwardly extending passage 3|. A hood or shelf 32 is afilxed to the front plate 30, the construction thus far described being similar to that illustrated in Figure 2. The lower end of the passage 31 is defined in part by a trough 33 afllxed to the back plate 29 for catching particles of grease and the like which may collect on the walls of the ventilator unit and drop downwardly in the passage. A wall portion of the duct means defining the passageway 3i opposite the trough 33, such as the lower edge 34 of the front plate 30. extends downwardly from the rear edge of the shelf 32 to a point within the trough 33 below the level of the rim, and the current of air entering the ventilating unit must, of necessity, fiow transversely of the trough under the edge 34 of the front plate. If accumulations of grease and the like he not removed from the trough 33, these will obstruct the flow of air through the intake opening and will eventually coact with the depending edge 34 to form a seal to prevent the passage of air through the ventilator unit.

Having described the apparatus for collecting particles of grease and the like in a ventilator asoaoss unit, the method of the present invention as carried out in said apparatus isas follows:

Referring to the drawing, it will be noted that in the various forms of construction illustrated entering currents of air are caused to reverse their direction of fiow. For example, as described in connection with the construction illustrated in Figures 1 and 2, air ascending from the cooking surface is drawn into the ventilator unit by way of the passageway II. In passing around the baiiies i3 successively, the direction of air flow is repeatedly sharply reversed in the manner described, causing liquid and solid particles to be separated onto the walls of the ventilator unit by centrifugal force. The products of condensation thus separated from the air stream will deposit themselves in the trough I! where they may conveniently be disposed of, the trough i2 being readily accessible through the intake opening ii for the cleaning thereof. As described,

the relationship of the trough i2 with the lower bai'iie II is such as to compel frequent disposal of accumulations in order to maintain proper operation of the ventilator. A high velocity air current is employed in the vent pipe, satisfactory results having been obtained with an air velocity 1. In a ventilator imit for a cooking range and the like, means including a rear wall and a front wall defining a eway therebetween, a baiiie secured along one edge to one of said walls substantially the width thereof and extending outwardly' from said one wall into said passageway, means defining a trough in the lower part of said passageway. the lower edge of said bame depending substantially into said trough, and means located above the cookingsurface of the range defining an inlet for said passageway extending substantially the entire length of said cooking surface. a

2. In a ventilator unit for a cooking range and the like, duct means defining a ventilation passageway, means positioned above the cooking surface of said range defining an inlet extending substantially the entire length of said cooking surface, means for effecting a high velocity fiow of air through said passageway, means forming a bailie extending outwardly and downwardly from an upper wall portion of said duct means into said passageway substantially the entire width thereof to cause separation of condensed grease particles and the like from said air flow, a portion of from 500 to 1500 feet per minute, depending upon the structural variations in the ventilator unit. with such a rapid air flow the action within the unit is quite turbulent. It should be remembered that grease ascending from the cooksurface in the form of hot vapor is rapidly condensed in the colder strata of air above the cooking surface and is more or less in globular form when acted upon by the centrifugal forces created by the tortuous passage of the air through the ventilator unit.

In the construction illustrated in Figure 5 the current of entering air is first caused to fiow over the rim of the trough 83 and then under the depending edge 34 of the front plate 30. The air current is then caused to follow the contour of the inner surface of the trough 33, duringwhich 3, in which high velocity air currents are caused to reverse the direction of their flow in passing through the trap 21.

Although the invention has been disclosed and described in terms of specific structures for reversing the direction of the air flow and establishing a trap or the substantial equivalent thereof in the collecting trough, its application is not necessarily confined thereto, but may be used either in its entirety or in part, and either with or without modifications, in any construction wherein provision is made for collecting and disposing of products of condensation in a ventilator unit wherein the accumulation of said products is caused to interfere with the proper operation of said ventilator unit, and I deem myself entitled to all such uses, modifications and variations as fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Having now described my invention and in what manner the same may be used, what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

preciated that a similar result is achieved in the construction illustrated in Figure of a lower wall of said duct means adjacent said inlet defining a receptacle coextensive with said inlet for collecting grease particles and the like separated from said air flow in said'passageway, the lower edge of said bailie depending substantially into said receptacle and spaced from the bottom thereof whereby accumulations of grease and the like in said receptacle will retard flow of air through said passageway.

8. In a ventilatorunit for a cooking range and the like, duct means defining a ventilation passageway, means for moving a current of air through said passageway, means for separating products of condensation from said current of air, said last mentioned means including a baiiie depending from a first wall portion ofsaid duct means into said passageway and a trough formed in a second wall portion oi said duct means opposite said first wall portion and arranged beneath said baffle for. collecting said products of condensation,'the lower edge of said baiiie extending substantially into said trough forming therewith a tra in said passageway wherein accumulated products of condensation will eifectively restrict fiow of air through the ventilator unit.

4. In a ventilator unit for a cooking range and the like, duct means defining a ventilation pasa sageway, means for moving a current of air through said passageway, means for separating products of condensation from said current of air, said last mentioned means including a baffle provided on each of a pair of opposite walls of said the like, duct means defining a ventilation passageway. means for moving a current of air through said passageway, a plurality of elements for separating products of condensation-from said current of-air including a bai'ile depending from a first wall portion of said duct means into said passageway and a trough formed in a second wall portlon'ot said duct means opposite said iirst wall portion and arranged beneath said baflie for collecting said products of condensation. the lower edge of said baille depending substantially into said trough and spaced from the bottom thereof whereby accumulations of grease and the like in said trough will retard the flow of air through said passageway, at least one or said elements being removable for cleaning purpom.

a tortuous path for said air current through said passageway, means defining an opening in said aseaoss duct means. a detachable elomrfme'mber io'r ciosingsaidopeningbneofsaidhaiiiesbeing seeuredtosaidclosurememherandbeingremovable therewith.

'l. Inaventilatorunitioracookingrangeand the like, duct meam defining a ventilation passagewa'y. means for moving a current 0! air through said assageway. means mounted in said duct means for separating the products of eondensation from said current or air, a portion of said duct means forming a receptacle for collecting grease particles and the like separated from the air flow in said passageway, said last named means including a baiiie provided on each or a pairot opposite walls of said duct means. said baiiies extending outwardly into said passageway in a transverse direction and being longitudinally spaced as regards the length of said length of said passageway, said baiiies defining 20 passageway, one of said bafiies andssaid receptacle cooperatively defining a tortuous path for said air current through said passageway.

ASA K. GAYLORD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2481341 *Oct 3, 1945Sep 6, 1949William A PledgerVentilating device for kitchens and kitchen stoves
US2525213 *Aug 23, 1945Oct 10, 1950Freto CompanyCooking apparatus
US2535863 *Sep 3, 1946Dec 26, 1950Pledger William AVentilating device for a kitchen and a kitchen stove
US2542265 *Mar 28, 1945Feb 20, 1951Staples Richard ERotatable automatic broilergriddle
US2564074 *Jan 31, 1949Aug 14, 1951Dohrmann Hotel Supply CoCleanout ventilator attachment for ranges
US2564075 *Mar 4, 1949Aug 14, 1951Dohrmann Hotel Supply CoVentilator attachment
US2564087 *May 22, 1948Aug 14, 1951Southern California Gas CoRange with ventilating hood
US2577150 *Jan 27, 1947Dec 4, 1951William A PledgerKitchen stove ventilator
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US2750937 *Feb 19, 1952Jun 19, 1956Sjolund Vaino VSteam cooking apparatus
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US20090013989 *May 19, 2008Jan 15, 2009Brown Stephen LLineal slot ventilator with internal cleaning system and adjustable baffle
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/299.00D, 55/433, 55/DIG.360, 55/442
International ClassificationF24C15/20
Cooperative ClassificationF24C15/20, Y10S55/36
European ClassificationF24C15/20