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Publication numberUS2393347 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1946
Filing dateOct 26, 1940
Priority dateOct 26, 1940
Publication numberUS 2393347 A, US 2393347A, US-A-2393347, US2393347 A, US2393347A
InventorsStuart Kimberly, Allen B Wilson
Original AssigneeElizabeth R B Stuart
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making containers
US 2393347 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

K. STUART ET AL METHOD OF MAKING `CONTAINERS Jan. 22, 1946.

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 26, 1940 :Jawa/www Kimber/y 5jaar! v Alie?? 5. h/Z/son' Jan 22, 1946. K. VSTUART ETAL METHOD OF MAKING CONTAINERS Filed Oct. 26, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 4i/en ,5.1465072 Patented Jan. 1946 l METHOD OF MAKING COTAINEBS Kimberly Stuart, Menasha, Wis., and Allen B.

Wilson, Evanston, Ill.: said Wilson assisllor.` by

mesne assignments, to Elizabeth R. B. `Stuart Menasha, Wis.

Application October 26, 1940, Serial No. @3,060

(Cl. S33-39.1)

, 1s claims.

The presentinvention relates to containers for packaging foods, liquids and any other substances and to methods of making such containers. More particularly, our invention is concerned with spirally wound tubular containers which are lined to be leak-proof and impervious to mechanical or chemical action of the contents, and with methods of making such lined containers. v

The invention is especially designed for packaging food mixtures and liquids in containers of suitable size for retail sale, and the preferred embodiment of the invention to be hereinafter described has been found to be very satisfactory for paper beer cans of two quart capacity or more. It will be understood, however, that the scope of the invention is not thus limited but embraces containers for any substances.

It has heretofore been suggested to line liquid carrying paper containers with foil or cellophane but such linings have generally been inserted into otherwise complete containers, andl this presents diiliculties of assembly. In practicing our invention, the lining is incorporated during manufacture of the container walls and to our knowledge We are the first to make a spirally wound of lthe present invention to provide a novel in- `expensive spirally wound paper or like fibrous container having a built-in lining of moistureimpervious material which is chemically inert to the contents of the container, and novel methods of making the container.

A further object of the invention is to provide a. novel spirally wound container having a substantially continuous tubular lining of metal foil, and novel methods of making the container. Preferably the foil lining is adhesively sealed by a special latex adhesive chemically inert to the contents of the container.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel spirally wound container having an integral built-in thermoplastic lining, and novel methods of making the container. Preferably, the lining material is sheet rubber hydrochloride.

.It is a further object of the invention to provide a nove1method o'f making a tubular container body wherein a strip of liner material,

` having its inner surface treated'to be chemically inert with respect to thecontents with which the container is to be filled, is spirally woundon a mandrel to form a tubular liner portion; and then successive adhesively secured spiral layers of paper or the like are built upor. and about the liner portion until the body is of desired wall thickness.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel spirally wound container having a, substantially continuous lining of material which is moisture-impervious and chemically inert with respect to the contents of the container andwherein a closure member is sealed to the container and further secured thereto by a clenched metal reinforcing rim, and novel methods of making the container.

vFurther objects of the invention will presently appear as the description proceeds in connection with the appended claims and the annexed drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is an exploded view in section of a container comprising a preferred embodiment of the invention, prior to assembly of the containerbody with the end closure members;

Figure 2 is a sectional view illustrating the rst step in assembly of the container parts of .Figure 1 wherein the bottom closure member is attached to the container body;

y' vFigure 3 is an enlarged fragmentary section illustrating the adhesive bond between the foil [container wherein the top closure member or cover is attached to the container body in the same manner as the bottom closure member;

Figure 6 is a ydiagrammatic view illustrating a method of making the tubular container body wherein the liner strip is wound with a butt seam between convolutions;

Figure 6A illustrates application of the adhesive to the butt seam by the inner body wall strip, wherein the strip is provided with a narrow strip of adhesive on its inner surface;

Figure 7 is a section along line 1-1 of Figure 6 illustrating the laminated paper and foil construction of the liner strip;

, Figure 8 illustrates a'variation of the method of Figure 6 wherein the paper and foil liner strip isv wound-with an overlapped adhesively secured seam;

Figure o' is su exploded view m section similar to Figure 1 except that the container body andz bottom closure member;

Figure 12 is a section illustrating the complete container having the top closure member heat sealed to the container body and provided with a. clenched metal rim:

Figure 13 illustrates a method. of forming the linerl employed in the tubular body member of the container of Figure 9, wherein a sheet of thermoplastic material is lap wound on a mandrei and its seams are heat sealed by a hot roller;

Figure le illustrates a variation of the method illustrated in Figure i3 wherein the thermoples tic strip is laminated to a strip of paper before winding on the mandrel;

Figure 15 is a section on. line i-l of Figure 14. illustrating the laminated construction of the liner'strip of Figure le;

Figure i6 is a section on line lt-i of Figure i4 illustrating the butt seam between the wound strip convolutions before heat sealing;

Figure 17 is a section illustrating the liner seam of Figure i6 after it has been heat sealed; and

Figure i8 is a section through a dared end can provided with hat closure members and klined.

according to the invention.

Our invention briey comprises making a splrally wound tubular container body having a substantially continuous inner lining which is moisture and gas proof and chemically inert with respect to the contents of the container, and providing the container with end closure members lined with the same material as the con tainer body. The linings of the container body and the closure members are sealed to each other and comprise a substantially continuous envelope surrounding the contents of the container.

Preferably the container is lined with aluminum foil or a thermoplastic sheet material such as rubber hydrochloride or Plioiilm.

'An especially important feature of the invention is our novel manner of making the tubular container body wherein we ilrst spirally wind suitable strip material on a mandrel to form a tubular liner and then, after sealing the seams of the liner, we build up further spiral layers of relatively heavy paper or like brous material until the desired wall thickness has been ob tained. Where the liner material is sumcently tough to withstand relatively rough handling and the tension required for winding it on the mandrei, as with sheet rubber hydrochloride or Pliofilm, the initial step of making the liner comprises windlng an individual strip of this material. Where, however, the material is relatively fragile and easy to tear, as in the case of thin, light aluminum foil, we prefer to laminate it to a strip of thin backing paper before Winding.

Foil-lined container vReferring to Figures 1 8, the container comprises a tubular cylindrical body III of heavy paper, cardboard, uberboard or like inexpensive with a substantially continuous, smooth lining I2 of metahfo'll. such as aluminum foil. In the illustratedembodiment of the invention, the container isfprovided with internally fltting shallow, cylindrical, cup-shaped bottom and top closure members I3 and I4 having foil linings i5 and l, respectively.

Closure members I3 and I4 are suitably formed from paper, cardboard, flbreboard or like fibrous material; and llinings I5 and I6 are cemented thereto by a suitable adhesive such as the latex adhesive described in Stuart Patent No. 2,068,893.

Tubular container body Ill is preferably constructed by the method illustrated in Figure 6.

Tubular liner Il is shaped by spirally winding a laminated strip I1 upon a suitable rotatable mandrel I8. As illustrated in Figure 7, strip l'i comprises a thin, tough, flexible sheet of paper it bonded in full surface engagement with a thin sheet of aluminum foil 2l. Preferably sheets lil and 2l are adhesively bonded by the latex adhesive above described.

Laminated strip Ill is spirally wound with its foil surface 2i contacting the periphery of the mandrel so as to comprise the inner surface o the liner tube and adjacent edges of the wound strip are `disguised. in abutting relation. The width of strip il and the pitch of the spiral in which it is wound on the mandrel are matters of choice depending on the type of the container to be manufactured.

At the section indicated at 22 in Figure t, the liner tube consists of spirally wound abutting coils which are maintained in this position on the mandrel by winding tension. Beyond section 22, a narrow thin strip E@ of paper or like material having its inner face coated with a fresh layer of adhesivev is spirally wound upon and along the butt seam between adjacent coils of the liner tube. Thisseals the butt seam at the section-indicated at 22' in Figure 6. sumcientadhesive is supplied 'at the butt joint to lill the seam and insure proper attachment of the adjoining coils, and no excess adhesive is transmitted to the mandrel surface. Beyond section 22', a strip .of paper, cardboard, or like fibrous material 23, the inner surface of which passes over a suitable adhesive coating roll 2d, is spirallyr wound upon the liner tube. Strip 2li is preferably appreciably thicker and stronger than the liner strip and is coated with the latex adhesive described above.

As strip 23 is splrally wound about the liner tube, it is adhesively secured thereto and there= by assists strip 2li in retaining the convolutiens of the liner tube in contiguous abutting relation. Strip 2Il prevents excess adhesive from the inner surface of strip 23 from entering the butt seams between the convolutions of strip il. This prevents oozing of excess adhesive to the mandrel surface. The pitch of strip 23 may be opposite to that of strip il if desired.

' As shown in Figure 6A, strip 2t may be omitted and the inner surface of strip 23 coated with a thin strip of adhesive 23' located to fall directly upon and along the butt seam.

Beyond the winding station of strip 222, a fur-v ther strip 25 similar to strip 23 is spirally wound about the mandrel exteriorly of wound strip 23 to build up a second layer of relatively thick `paper. A suitable roll 26 coats the vinner face of strip 25 with our above described latex acl-u hesive in the same manner as-strip 23. Beyond strip 25, additional strips are spirally wound and brous material, having a tubular liner Ii faced 76 adhesively bonded in succession until `the conthe spiral vcan winding art, further description of the same' is deemed unnecessary to understand the invention.

After the container body tubing has been built up to required wall thickness, it is cut-into individual container body lengths in the usual manner'and is ready for incorporation in the com-' plete container. i y

Tubular container body I0, made as above described, comprises a relatively stift cylinder of spirally wound paper or like brous material having a substantially continuous inner surface of metal foil. This inner surface of metal foil is smooth and uninterrupted except at the spiral liner seams. 'I'he space between these seams is filled and sealed by the latex adhesive supplied by .strip 20 as above described. Strip 20 andthe several succeeding adhesively secured paper layers retain the coils of strip I1 against separation.

While the use of the above-identified latex adhesive is especially satisfactory in practicing the invention because it is impervious to moisture and chemically inert with respect to beer, foods, and` most mixtures and liquids which are usually packaged in this manner, it is within the scope of this invention to employ any quick adhesive which is non-toxic for the particular contents of the container. 'I'he particular adf hesive is usually selected for its inertness with closure member I3.

ner as above described for bottom closure member I3 and as illustrated in Figure 5.

The complete container of Figure 5 comprises a sturdy cylindrical paper can wherein the top,A

bottom and inner side walls are lined with a chemically inert, moisture-proof envelope which has been incorporated into the can during. the method of its making and assembly above described. The interior of the can is perfectly smooth and the exposed foil and adhesive portions of the lining prevent leakage of the contents through to the relatively porous outer walls I0, I3 and I5. The can is further reinforced against rough handling andthe development of internal i during winding, successive convolutions of the strip are adhesively secured to each other with a lapped seam. The wound liner tubing section indicated at 32 is provided Iwithfsuch additional layers of paper as are required to build the conn tainer 'body tube to desired wall thickness in the manner described in Figures 6 and 8.

It is ordinarily a matter of choice as to whether a butt or lapped seam is provided for the container liner. This choice usually depends upon the natureof the' material'to bepackaged. 'I Yhc lapped seam requires a greater amount of material than the butt seam, but it provides a more' effective seal. 'I'he butt seam is easier to wind tubular body member I0 is first provided with bottom Closure member I3 vfits snugly within body I0 with the arcuate surfaces of foil lining I5 substantially uniformly con` tacting inner foil lining I2.

As illustrated in Figures 2 and 3, we seal bottom closure member I3 to the container body by providing a film or layer 21 of our latex adhesive lwhich may increase to -such proportions as to burst the closure member seals. 'I'he canning of beer is a very good example of a problem of this kind. In order to reinforce the seal and bond between our container body and the bottom closure member, weprovide the joint between them with a continuous C-shaped clenched metal rim strip havingits opposite lateral edges biting l into the paper at opposite sides ofthe joint. lTheclenched rim and the method and' apparatus for applying it to the container may be that disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 2,-

283,962 issued May 26, 1942, but preferably we Iemploy the serrated end rim disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 2,342,715 issued February 27, 1944, which is especially suitable for securing closure members on containers.

After bottom closurel member I3v has been attached, the container is then provided with yits contents and top closure member I5 attached to the container body in substantially the same man and other liquid foods and beverages, we havev and is perfectly satisfactory for mo'st purposes, however.

'I'he internal surface of a' container body provided with a lapped seam liner of Figure 8 is substantially as smooth as in a container having a butt seam liner since both the foil 2I and backing paper I9 are quite thin and their combined thick- 'ness at the seam lap is v ery small.

Thermoplastic shet lined container Figures 9-17 illustrate a tubular container lined with thermoplastic sheet material and methods of making the container. y Y

Referring to Figure 9, the tubular container body 30 is provided with a tubularliner 33 of thermoplastic sheet material.` For purposes of the y invention, especially in the canning of syrup, beer,

found that sheet'rubber hydrochloride known under the trade name of Plioiilm is very satisfactory,

but. any other equivalent thermoplastic sheet material which is impervious to moistureand at the same time'chemically resistant to `the action of the contents .of the can may be employed. The

v contamer-also comprises bottom and top end clomaterial. ably formed from paper or like fibrous materialv similarly to closure membersv I3l and Il, and linsure members 34 and 35, which are lined at 36 and 31, respectively, with the same thermoplastic sheet Closure. members 3l and 35 are suitings 36 and 31 are preferably uniformly bonded thereto in smooth intimate full surface engagement of our latex adhesive.

Figure 13 illustratesthe initial step of a preferred manner of manufacturing container body 32; A thin sheet of rubber hydrochloride isspirally wound upon mandrel I8 to form the tubular method yof l liner section indicated at 33. Strip 33 is prei.' ably wound in such manner that adjacent narrow edge areas oi' the convolutions. are lapped as indicated in Figure 13 and these lapped areas are subjected to combined heat and pressure, as by heated roller 4 I.

Roller 4| is maintained 'at a suillciently lhigh temperature to soften the overlapped strip areas which thereby fuse and become integral, and the pressure of roller 4I is sufilcient to lflatten this lapped fused seam to distribute the material uniformly and prevent undesirable bulges at the linex` seams. I'he effect o1' subjecting the liner tubing to the heat and pressure or roller 4| is to fuse and weld the wound liner strip into a continuous integral tube. Following this welding operation, successive layers oi' paper or the like are spirally wrapped and adhesively secured upon and about the liner tube in the manner above described.

Roller 4| may be of any suitable length for insuring proper fusing of the seam of the liner tubing. Roller 4I is idly rotatably supported at the ends of pivoted arms 42 and 43, which carry the electrical wires for supplying current to the internal roller heater element, and is rotated by vreason of its frictional contact with the driven liner tubing.

During ordinary operating conditions, roller 4| is held in contact with the surface of the liner tubing by its own weight and the force of springs 44 which react between washers 45 secured to control rods 45, pivotally connected to the outer ends of arms 42 and 43, and stationary abutments 01. Rods 46 are suitably interconnected and the mechanism operating mandrel I8 actuates suitable devices insuring that rods 46 are displaced downwardly automatically whenever rotation of the mandrel stops. This may be effected for example by a centrifugal switch or the like at the mandrel drive controlling a solenoid assembly 43' adapted to pull down rods 46. Springs 44 re-establish the roller on the tubular lining when the solenoid is de-energized. However, the exact details of this mechanism are not essential to a complete understanding of the invention, it being only necessary that roller V4I be displaced from the' surface of the liner tubing while mandrel I8 is stationary.

While the above-described manner of applying heat for sealing the liner tubing seams is preferable, equivalent methods may be used without departing from the spirit ofthe invention.l For example, heated roller 4| may be applied after one or more outer paper layers have been wound about the liner tubing, care being taken to accomplish this before the paper layers are so thick aslto insulate the lining, or thevmandrel itself may loe internally heated and the sealing effected at any time during or after winding of the container body tube 30.

Beyond section 39, paper or ber board strips are spirally wound and adhesively secured about the liner tube in the manner above described until the container Ibody tubing on mandrel I8 is built up to desired wall thickness. The body tubing is then cut into lengths 30 which are ready for assembly into the complete container.

Tubular container body 30 thus manufactured comprises a relatively stiff paper cylinder which is mechanically strong and lined internally with a smooth uninterrupted coating of thermoplastic material. The relatively slight bulges where lthe seams of strip 33 are welded together are so smoothed and distributed along the container that they are not appreciable tothe eye and do not interfere with the appearance'of the container.

In assembly oi' the container elements, bottom closure member 34 isnrst inserted into container body 30 so that the arcuate face of lining 36 is in uniform contact with end areas oi' lining 33. Heat and pressure are then applied at the Joint between Vclosure member 34- and the container body in sumcient degree to fuse the contacting areas of thermoplastic linings 38 and 33 until they are integrally united as shown in Figure 10. Plioiilm is such an excellent conductor of heat that the application of a heated iron along the edge indicated at 34 in Figure l0 -is sumcient to fuse the lining along the entire peri'pheral depth of closure member 34.

C-shaped rim 2.8 is then applied to the joint between body 30 and closure member 34 'as illustrated in Figurel vl-l. After the container has been provided with its contents, upper closure member 35 is then heat sealed to the container body in the same manner as member 34 and C-shaped rim 29 applied to reinforce the joint between closure member 35 and the container body as illustrated in Figure l2.

The finished container thereby comprises a spirally wound paper can continuously and integrally lined 4with thermoplastic material which comprises a complete envelope about the contents of thecontainer and which is gas prooi and moisture impervious and chemically inert with respect to beer, food or other contents of the can. Furthermore, rubber hydrochloride or Pliofilm possesses suicient elasticity to withstand contraction and expansion resulting from temperature variations without injury to its sealing action. We have found that practically the thermoplastically sealed container provides a somewhat better bond between the container body and closure members than the adhesively sealed foil lined container.

Figure 14 illustrates a further manner of forming the tubular liner for container body 30 in the initial step of manufacturing that body. While sheet rubber hydrochloride is ordinarily suiliciently tough to withstand winding tension, it may be desired to employ'very thin sheets of this material or to employ sheets of other thermoplastic material which are susceptible to tearing. In such instances, we laminate the rubber ,hydrochloride to a thiny exible sheet of paper 4as illustrated in Figures 14 and 15 where liner strip 48 comprises a thin flexible strip of tough paper 49 secured to a. wider strip of sheet rubber hydrochloride or other thermoplastic 5|. Preferably the paper and rubber hydrochloride sheets are uniformly bonded by our latex' adhesive above described, and the thermoplastic strip extends a substantial distance beyond the lateral edge of the paper strip as indicated at 52 in Figures 15 Beyond the winding station of strip 48, heat and pressure applying roller 4| is applied to the periphery of the Wound liner tubing section indicated at 50, and this heat and pressure is sutilcient to soften and Weld the lapped areas of thermoplastic strip 52 together to forni the fused seam indicated at 53 in Figure 1'1.-` During this operation, pressure of the roller is suiiicient to substantially align the paper backings 48 of the adjacent convolutions into substantially abutting relation as illustrated in Figure 17. a

lsheet rubber hydrochloride is employed atV 5I.

strips 49 and 5| may be of the same width and wound on the mandrel with a butt seam between convolutions. Such alsearn will sealupon application of heat and pressure similarly to the butt seam of strip 38 above described.

Figure 18 illustrates a further embodiment of the invention wherein thecanbody comprises a spirally wound `cylindrical tube 54 having flared *'25 monastic material at an end of said body with ends l5 which terminate in relatively nat lip portion 5i. Tube 54 is manufactured by the usual methods of making such cans and is internally lined with a layer of moisture impervious, chemically resistant material 51 which may be the a0 mg of said material within said container n metal foil or the thermoplastic sheet material above described and which is incorporatedy dur.

ing the initial steps vof forming the tube according to the invention as above described.

As illustrated in Figure 18, lining 51 extends over lip portions 56 and thereby provides a seat for nat closure members 58. Each closure member 58 comprises a still' circular cardboard member having an inner liner face 59 consisting of a sheet of metal foil or rubber hydrochloride ad-` hesively bonded thereto and adapted to engage lining 51 and the containerbody in annular contact at lip 56.

Linings 59 and 51 are sealed together by our I latex adhesive where the linings are metal foil, or 45 by heat pressure where they are thermoplastic.

Reinforcing rims 28 and 29 are applied along the joints in the manner above described.

Our invention provides an inexpensive safe manner of packaging oils, syrup, beer and other beverages and liquid foods, other foods and like substances. The built-in lining insures that such substances do not contact tinned or like surfaces which many people believe alter the taste. The can joints are reinforced to withstand ,high lnternal pressures, andl to eliminate breakage due to rough handling.

The combined strength of the elastic joints between the can closure membersand` body and the clenched metal rims therealong is such thatv pended claims rather than by the foregoing description, and all changes which come within the meaning and range of equivalency oiA the claims are therefore intended to be embraced therein.

What is' claimed and desired to be secured by United States Letters Patent is:- I

1. In a method of making a container, the steps @by provide an integral continuous end and side of spirally winding a laminated strip of paper and thin tlexible moisture impervious sheet material upon a ,mandrel .to form a tubular liner member with said moisture impervious material denning 5 the inner surface-of said member; securing successive spirally wound layers about said liner member to build up ay tubular container body of 'desired wall thickness; providing a closure member formed with a thin liningof ilexible moisture .10 impervious material at an end of said body with portions of the moisture impervious linings of said members in substantial contact; plastically -sealing the joint between .said closure' member and body by bonding said ccwcting lining por- 15 tions together; and securing a substantially C- shaped clenched metal rim strip along and about said Joint vwith the opposite lateral edges of said strip biting into the body and closure member respectively.-

20 2. In a method of making a tubular container,

th steps of forming a spirally wound tubular container body 4having an integral continuous lining of thermoplastic material, providing a cl@- sure member continuously lined with said thersaid linings in contact, and applying heat and pressure to the joint between said closure member and said body to fuse said linings and thereby provide an integral continuous end and side lin- 3. In a method of making a tubular container, the steps of forming a spirally wound tubular container body having an integral continuous 1ining of' thermoplastic material, providing a closure 35 member continuously lined with said thermoplastic material at an end of said body with said linings in' substantial contact, applying heat and pressure to the joint between said closure member and said body to fuse said linings and therelining of said material within said container, and securing a reinforcing and protecting external rim strip entirely along said joint.

4. In the method defined in claim 3, said last step comprising securing a substantially C-shaped clenched rim strip of metal or like bendablematerial along andabout adjacent exposed edges of said body and closure member at said joint o with the opposite lateral edges of said strip biting into the body and closure member respectively.

5. In the method deiined in claim 2,'the steps of providing a second closure member continuously lined with said thermoplastic material at the open end of said container with said linings in substantial contact after the contents of said container have been placed thereinI and applying heat and pressure to the joint between said secw ond closure vmember and body to fuse said linings g5 body, the steps of spirally winding a strip of laminated paper and metal foil upon a mandrel to form a continuous tubular liner with an overlapped seam and with said foil defining the inner surface of said liner, applying an adhesive along '(0 an edge of said strip prior to said winding so that said seaml is adhesively sealed during said winding, and buildi g said body to desired wall thickness with succe said liner.

'Il 7. In a method of making a tubular container ve spirally wound layers about comprised of abutting adjacent edgesof said strip,

the foil surface of said strip dening the inner surface of said liner; and spirally winding an adhesively coated strip of relatively heavy paperor the like about said wound liner.

8. In a method of making a tubular container body, the steps of yspirally winding a strip of lam-v inated paper and thermoplastic sheet material upon a mandrel to form a tubular liner with said material dening the inner surface of said liner, applying heat and pressure to the wound liner to seal the seams of said liner, and then spirally winding and adhesively securing a strip o1 paper or like fibrous material about said formed tubular liner.

9. In a method of making a tubular container, the steps of laminating a thin strip of paper or the like to a wider strip of thin thermoplastic sheet material, winding said laminated strip spirally upon a mandrel to form a tubular liner with said material dening the inner suriace of said liner and being overlapped at the liner seams, and applying heat and pressure to fuse and seal lapped seams of said wound liner.

10. In a method of making a tubular container, the steps of spirally winding a strip of material having a moisture impervious face upon a cylindrical mandrel in such manner as to form atubular liner member with said face deining the inner surface of said container, sealing the joints between adjacent convolutions of said strip so that said surface comprises a moisture impervious wall, spirally winding and adhesively securing successive layers of brous strip material upon said liner member until a tubular container body of required wall thickness is provided, se-

curing a closure member having a moisture im' pervious inner surface within one end of said body, plastically bonding and sealing the joint between adjacent interior surfaces of said closure member and body, and applying a continuous substantially C-shaped metal rim strip along bonding and sealing adjacent inner surfaces of said body and second closure member, and finally applying a substantially c-shaped continuous metal rim strip along and about the joint between outer edges of said body and second closure member, with opposite lateral edges of said strip biting into the closure member and body respectively.

12. In a method of making a container for foods, beverages, oils and like substances, the steps of fabricating a tubular container body having a substantially continuous liner of a material which is moisture impervious and inert with respect to said substances, providing a closure member having its internal surface area lined with said material or a moisture proof chemicalv ly 'inert equivalent thereof at one end of said body with peripheral portions of said linings in intimate surface contact over appreciableA areas, plastically sealing the joint between said body and closure member by, bonding said contacting h'assainir linings together so that said linings are-made substantially continuous over said inner end and the inner sides of said container, and enclosing and protecting the exposed adjacent edges or said body and closure member at said Joint by securing. a clenched substantially C-shaped metal rim strip peripherally along and about said joint, with the opposite lateral edges of said strip biting into said closure member and body respectively.

13. In a method of making va container for foods, beverages, oils and like substances, wherein a closure member is provided with s. continuous surface portion coextensive with an end portion of a tubular container body member and wherein both of said members are substantially completelyinteriorly lined with a thermoplastic material which is moisture impervious andchemically inert with respect to said substances, the steps of positioning said closure member on said body member with said linings in intimate contact at said portions, applying sumcient heat to fuse ,said linings continuously along said portions so as to form an integral end and side lining within said container and plastically bond said body and closure members together, and enclosing and protecting exposed adjacent edges of said body and closure member by clenching a substantially C-'shaped rim strip of metal or the iike entirely along said joint with the opposite edges of said rim strip biting into the body and closure member respectively.

14. In a method of making a container for y foods, beverages, oils and like substances wherein a generally cupshaped closure member having a surface lining of thermoplasticmaterial is nested within an end of a tubular container body having a continuous inner lining of the same material, with the lining or a continuous peripheral wall on said closure memberI contacting the lining of said body over appreciable area and with the outer edges of said wall and said body being substantially coextensive and terminating substantially ilush with each other, the steps of fusing said linings together where they are in contact by application of h'eat externally ot the container, whereby an integral end and side lining is formed within the container, and clenching a substantially c-shaped rim strip of metal or the like entirely along the joint enclosing said outer edges with the opposite lateral edges of said rim strip biting into said body and closure member re-I said body and closure member, and securing av substantially C-shaped rim strip of metal or the like entirely along said Joint externally enclosing said coextensive edges.

16. In a method of making a container for foods, beverages, oils and like substances, the steps of fabricating a tubular container body having its interior substantially completely surfaced with material which is moisture impervious and chemically inert with respect to the substance packaged, providing a closure member having its interior surface lined with said material or its equivalent at one end of said body, plastically bonding said closure member and body together to provide a substantially exible joint between said body and closure member, and securing a reinforcing protective rim strip externally along said joint.

1'1. In a method of making a tubular container, the steps of forming a tubular container body having an integral lining of thermoplastic material, providing a closure member interiorly lined with thermoplastic material at an end of said body, applying heat and pressure to the joint between said closure member and said body to fuse said linings together and form a continuous gas and liquid proof end and side liner within said entirely along said joint.

18. In a method of making a tubular container',

the steps of forming .a tubular container body continuously lined with thermoplastic material, positioning a closure member continuously lined with thermoplastic material on said body with said linings in intimate contact and with the outer edges of said body and closure member being substantially coextensive and flush with 'each other, and applying sealing heat directly to said linings at their exposed edges. Y STUART.

ALLEN B. WILSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2448114 *May 18, 1943Aug 31, 1948Goodrich Co B FMethod for making heat-molded articles containing fabric reinforcements
US2464278 *Apr 2, 1945Mar 15, 1949Elizabeth R B StuartContainer and method of making same
US2515378 *Jan 10, 1946Jul 18, 1950Charles NicolleDispensing package of tablets and the like
US2557576 *Jan 14, 1949Jun 19, 1951Simmons Nicholas LPackage for whey concentrate and other dairy products
US2584095 *Jun 13, 1946Jan 29, 1952Extruded Plastics IncTubular container
US2601266 *Oct 17, 1950Jun 24, 1952Steatite Res CorpMethod of attaching ends to cylindrical objects of resin impregnated cloth laminatesand products so produced
US2605202 *Jul 9, 1948Jul 29, 1952Julian L ReynoldsMethod of forming continuous pipes
US2645591 *Oct 25, 1950Jul 14, 1953Sydney Thomas CorpMethod of bonding an end closure to a thermoplastic bag
US2653887 *Aug 1, 1947Sep 29, 1953Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpMethod of producing tubing
US2661790 *Sep 4, 1947Dec 8, 1953Extruded Plastics IncMachine for making tubular containers
US2669258 *Sep 14, 1948Feb 16, 1954American Nat Bag & Burlap Co IComposite packaging or wrapping material and manufacture thereof
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US2801946 *Nov 22, 1954Aug 6, 1957Evenblij Johan Carl JuliusMethod of making containers of glass fiber mat provided with end closures
US2849144 *Aug 22, 1955Aug 26, 1958Southwell Edward HFabricated container
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Classifications
U.S. Classification493/89, 206/811, 493/98, 229/5.84, 493/129, 493/109, 156/320, 493/128, 493/103, 493/95, 229/125.13, 156/195
International ClassificationB31C3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB31C3/02, Y10S206/811
European ClassificationB31C3/02