Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2394199 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1946
Filing dateAug 3, 1944
Priority dateAug 3, 1944
Publication numberUS 2394199 A, US 2394199A, US-A-2394199, US2394199 A, US2394199A
InventorsWilliam Myers Roy
Original AssigneeWilliam Myers Roy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cooling system
US 2394199 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1946- R. w. MYERS I ,3 s

COOLING SYSTEM Filed Aug. 5, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 1' g I R05 W R. w. MYERS COOLING SYSTEM Feb. 5, 1946..

Filed Aug. 5, 1944' 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I Q J Savor/WW1;

[209"WM96P5 Patented Feb. 5, 1946 6 Claims.

The invention relates to a heat dissipater for lowering the temperature of the cooling fluid in the water jacket of an internal combustion engine, which may be substituted for, or supplemented to, the usual radiator or cooling system for engines.

The object of' the invention is to provide a simple, efficient and inexpensive device through which the cooling fluid from the water jacket of the engine is continuously circulated, cooling air being continually passed through the cooling fluid in the heat dissipater for quickly lowering the temperature of the cooling fluidv Another object is to provide a reserve supply of cooling fluid with means for maintaining the desired level of cooling fiuid in the water jacket of the engine at all times.

Still another object of the invention is to provide means for automatically maintaining a-desired level of cooling fluid in the heat dissipater.

A further object of the invention is to provide means controlled by the suction of the engine for continuously drawing cooling air through the water in the heat dissipater.

A still further object is the provision of an air compressor or blower to supplement the suction of the engine, or to be substituted therefor, to continuously force cooling air through the water in the heat dissipater.

Another object of the invention is to provide a float operated inlet valve for maintaining the desired water level in the heat dissipater.

A still further object is the provision of a float operated inlet valve for maintaining the desired water level in the water jacket of the engine.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of a manifold for delivering cooled Water from the heat dissipater to a plurality of spaced points in the lower portion of the water jacket.

A further object is to provide a water pump for maintaining a continuous circulation of the water between the water jacket of the engine and the heat dissipater.

Another object is the provision of means for sealing the engine and heat dissipater and associated parts within the hood of an automobile with heat and cold insulation material, whereby the engine may be operated in sub-freezing temperatures without the necessity of adding antifreeze material to the water in the water jacket of the engine.

A further object of the invention is to provide means for breaking up the cooled air into a multiplicity of streams as it is passed through the water in the heat dissipater.

The above objects together with others which will be apparent from the drawings and following descriptionor which may be later referred to, may be attained by constructing the improved heat dissipater in the manner illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which 'Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view of an automobile engine showing the improved heat dissipater and associated parts connected thereto;

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view of the heat dissipater unit per se, and

Fig. 3 a similar view of a slightly modified form of heat dissipater'unit.

Referring first more particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, in which similar numerals indicate similar parts, an internal combustion engine is indicated generally at I0, being provided with the usual intake manifold M and carburetor l2 and oil filling neck 13. Air is shown as admitted to the carburetor through a pipe Hi extending down through the bottom wall iii of the hood. The oil filling neck l3 may be vented to the air inlet pipe 14 as indicated at 56.

A water reservoir I1 is located above the engine and connected thereto as by the gravity feed pipe l8 for maintaining the water jacket of the engine filled with water at all times, A filling neck l9 upon the water reservoir may be located through the top wall 20 of the hood and provided With a filling cap or closure 2|.

In order to maintain the water level in, the water jacket of the engine at the desired point a fioat operated valve 22 is provided within the upper portion of the water jacket at the point where the reserve water pipe it enters the same.

As the water in the Water jacket falls below this point the float 23, controlling said valve, will drop, opening the valve and admitting water from the reservoir until the level of the water is raised to the point where the float 23 will automatically close the valve 22. A vent pipe 24 may be provided in the top of the water jacket if desired.

The heat dissipater per se is indicated generally at 25 and is preferably formed of upper and lower sections connected by the flanges 26, between which a suitable gasket 21 is located for providing a water tight joint.

Water is admitted to the upper portion of the heat dissipater 25 from the upper portion of the Water jacket through the pipe 28. This may be by gravity feed as shown in Fig. 1 or if the heat dissipater is located at a higher level than the engine an ordinary water pump may be provided in the pipe 28 for pumping the water from the upper portion of the water jacket to the heat dissipater.

In order to maintain a desired level of the water in the heat dissipater a float opera ted valve 29 may be provided in the heat dissipater at the point where the pipe 28 enters the same. As soon as the water level within the heat dissipater drops below this point the float 30 which controls the valve 29 will drop causing the valve to open and water to be admitted from the pipe 28 until this level is reached at which time the float will automatically close the valve 29.

A pipe 3! leads from the upper end of the heat dissipater to the intake manifold l I and a trap 32 is preferably located in said pipe so as to trap any moisture which may be drawn out of the top of the heat dissipater by the suction of the engine. This moisture may be drained from the trap through the drain 33 therein.

A spray nozzle 34 is located in the lower portion of the heat dissipater and communicates with the air pipe 35, which has a goose neck 36 therein extending to a point above the water level in the heat dissipater, and then down through the bottom wall l5 of the hood.

In order to supplement the suction of the engine, through the pipe 3 I, or as a substitute thereof, an air compressor or blower 31 may be provided in the pipe for forcing cold air through the spray nozzle 34 and through the water in the heat dissipater.

The lower portion of the heat dissipater is connected, as by the pipe 38, with a manifold 39 which communicates with several spaced points in the lower portion of the water jacket as indicated at 40. A water pump indicated generally at 4 I, which is preferably a gear type pump, may be provided for pumping water from the lower portion of the heat dissipater to the manifold 39.

However if the heat dissipater is located at a higher level than the engine the water may feed by gravity through. the pipe 38 to the manifold '39. In order to trap any sediment from the heat dissipater and prevent the same from being conveyed to the water jacket of the engine a trap 42 may be provided in the pipe 38.

For the purpose of preventing freezing of the water in the cooling system in sub-freezing temperatures the entire inside of the hood may be sealed with heat and cold insulation as indicated at 43. A valve 44 may be provided in the pipe 3| to regulate the suction therethrough and a valve 45 may be located in the pipe 38 to regulate the flow of water through the pump 4|.

In the operation of the device the system is filled with water through the filling neck I9, filling the water jacket and heat dissipater to the desired levels after which the reservoir I! may be completely or nearly filled.

When the engine is operated cooling air is drawn through the pipe 35 and sprayed through the nozzle 34 upward through the water in the heat dissipater by means of the suction of the engine through the pipe 3!, or by the compressor or blower 31, or the combination of both as desired. The cooled water will be withdrawn from the lower portion of the heat dissipater and passed through the manifold 39 through which it is distributed to the several points in the lower portion of the water jacket.

Hot water from the top of the water jacket will 'be conveyed through the pipe 28 to the heat dissipater and this circulation will be continuous during the time the engine is operating, the water level in the heat dissipater being maintained at the desired level by means of the float valve 29. As water is evaporated in the cooling system the float valve 22 in the upper portion of the engine will operate to admit water from the reservoir i! so as to always maintain an adequate supply of water in the water jacket of the engine.

In Fig. 3 is shown a modified form of the heat dissipater unit which may be substituted for the heat dissipater 25 in the assembly shown in Fig. 1. This heat dissipater is indicated generally at 25c and is arranged so that water is admitted thereto from the upper portion of the water jacket of the engine through the pipe 28a. The heat dissipater 25a may be located in the same relation to the engine as the heat dissipater 25 in Fig. 1, in which event hot water from the upper portion of the water jacket will feed by gravity through the pipe 28a to the heat dissipater, or it may be located above the level of the engine in which case the hot water from the upper portion of the water jacket may be pumped to the upper portion of the heat dissipater as by the Water pump 4 la.

A valve 29a, operated by a float 30a, is provided in the heat dissipater 25a at the point where the pipe 28a enters the same so as to maintain a constant level of water therein. The pipe 3m leads from the top of the heat dissipater to the intake manifold of the engine so as to create a suction or vacuum within the heat dissipater to draw cooling air upward through the water.

A screen 34a is located across the bottom of the heat dissipater 25a and an outer shell 2512 surrounds the lower portion of the heat dissipater and communicates with the air pipe 35 which may be of the same arrangement as the pipe 35 in Figs. 1 and 2.

A pipe 38a communicates with the lower portion of the outer shell 25b for conveying water either by gravity or by means of a pump to the manifold at the lower end of the water jacket of the engine, as indicated at 39 in Fig, 1. Cooling air may be drawn through the water in the heat dissipater 25a either by the suction of the engine, or by a compressor or blower as shown in Fig. l, or the combination of both, and the operation will be as above described.

I claim:

1. A water cooling means for a water jacketed internal combustion engine, comprising a waterconducting passage leading from the upper portion of the engine jacket, a heat dissipater receptacle communicating near its upper end with said water-conducting passage, an air-conducting passage communicating with the lower portion of the heat dissipater receptacle, means for passing air from said air-conducting passage through the water in the heat dissipater receptacle and means for returning cooled water from the lower portion of the heat dissipater to the lower portion of the engine jacket.

2. A water cooling means for a water jacketed internal combustion engine, comprising a waterconducting passage leading from the upper portion of the engine jacket, a heat dissipater receptacle communicating near its upper end with said water-conducting passage, an air-conducting passage communicating with the lower portion of the heat dissipater receptacle, a nozzle for spraying air from said air-conducting passage through the water in the heat dissipater receptacle and means for returning cooled water from the lower portion of the heat dissipater to the lower portion of the engine jacket.

3. A water cooling means for a water-jacketed internal combustion engine, comprising a waterconducting passage leading from the upper portion of the engine jacket, a heat dissipate! receptacle communicating near its upper end with said water-conducting passage, a float operated valve for maintaining a constant water level in the heat dissipater receptacle, an air-conducting passage communicating with the lower portion of the heat dissipater receptacle, means for passing air from said air-conducting passage through the water in the heat dissipater receptacle and means for returning cooled Water from the lower portion of the heat dissipater to the lower portion of the engine jacket.

4. A water cooling means for a water-jacketed internal combustion engine, comprising a waterconducting passage leading from the upper portion of the engine jacket, a heat dissipater receptacle communicating near its upper end with said water-conducting passage, an air-conducting passage communicating with the lower portion of the heat dissipater receptacle, means for passing air from said air-conducting passage through the water in the heat dissipater receptacle and means for returning cooled water from the lower portion of the heat dissipater to the lower portion of the engine jacket, a water reservoir above the engine and a pipe connecting the lower portion of the reservoir with the top of the engine jacket, and a float operated valve for controlling the admission of water from the reservoir to the engine jacket.

5. A water cooling means for a water-jacketed internal combustion engine, comprising a waterconducting passage leading from the upper portion of the engine jacket, a heat dissipater receptacle communicating near its upper end with said water-conducting passage, said heat dissipater comprising an inner shell, a screen at the bottom of the inner shell and an outer shell surrounding and spaced from the lower end of the inner shell, an air-conducting passage communicating with the lower portion of the heat dissipater receptacle, means for passing air from said air-conducting passage through the water in the heat dissipater receptacle and means for returning cooled water from the lower portion of the heat dissipater to the lower portion of the engine jacket.

6. A water cooling system for a water jacketed internal combustion engine, comprising a heat dissipater receptacle communicating near its upper end with the upper portion of the water jacket and communicating near its lower end with the lower portion of the water jacket, means for conducting air upwardly through the heat dissipater receptacle, a hood enclosing the engine and cooling system and heat and cold in-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4494492 *Apr 5, 1983Jan 22, 1985Motorenfabrik Hatz Gmbh & Co. KgLiquid-cooled power aggregate or engine having an arrangement for suppressing vibration
US7438027 *Jun 7, 1995Oct 21, 2008Hinderks Mitja VFluid transfer in reciprocating devices
US20100269768 *Dec 23, 2008Oct 28, 2010Aharon KrishevskyApparatus For Controlling The Level Of Engine Fluid
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/41.3, 261/77, 123/41.48
International ClassificationF01P11/02, F01P9/00, F01P11/00, F01P9/04
Cooperative ClassificationF01P11/02, F01P9/04
European ClassificationF01P11/02, F01P9/04