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Publication numberUS2394454 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1946
Filing dateMay 2, 1944
Priority dateJan 27, 1943
Publication numberUS 2394454 A, US 2394454A, US-A-2394454, US2394454 A, US2394454A
InventorsFritz Kappeler
Original AssigneeR & E Huber Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rubber sole for sport shoes
US 2394454 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

FeB. 5, 1946. F. KAPPELER RUBBER SOLE FOR SPORT SHOES Filed May 2. 1944 rlaia 2 M /P/M/WQ// Patented Feb. 5, 1946 RUBBER SOLE FOR SPORT SHOES FritzKappeler, Bulach, Switzerland, assignor to Aktiengesel lschatt R. & Huber,v Schweizerische Kabob, Drahtund Gumniiwcrke, Pfafl'ikon, Switzerland Application May 2, 1944, Serial No. 533,699 In Switzerland January 27, 1943 2 Claims.

The present invention relates to rubber soles for sports shoes, particularly for ski or mountain shoes, having its tread surface provided with projections to prevent slipping. The object of the invention is to provide a rubber sole for sports shoes having improved non-slip features.

According to the invention, a greater security against slipping is obtained in that the projections extend along a broken line and are of such shape that no through-passing straight interstices extending to the edge of the sole, which g would favour slipping, are present in any direc-'- tion in the plane of the sole between the projections, while the interstices provided between the projections of the sole and of the heel form reentering angles the points of which are forwardly directed at the sole and rearwardly at the heel, in order to create opposed wedging effects on the sole and on the heel to increase the security against slipping.

The accompanying drawing represents by way of example a, preferred embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 1 is a view on the tread surface of a rubber sole according to the invention.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section along the broken line IIII of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a partial view of the tread surface of the sole drawn to a greater scale.

Fig. 4 is a transverse section along the line IVIV of Fig. 3.

The represented sole l is provided along its lateral marginal portions with projections 2 extending in zigzag shape and which are alternatively separated by larger interstices 6 and narrower interstices 6' so as to form pairs. In the central portion of the sole there are provided further projections 3 also extending along a broken line and having different shapes. These projections 3 are so disposed that they intercept the extensions of the passages formed by the interstices 6 and 6' between the marginal projections 2. The front end of the sole is provided with projections 4 which are larger than the projections 2, and the interstices 5 between these projections 4 are of smaller depth than the interstices 6 and 6' between the projections 2. In this manner a reinforcement of the sole is obtained at the point thereof which is subjected to increased wear.

The heel 1 is provided with projections 8 along formed in the central portion of the heel I, while the rear end of the heel is provided with projections l0 which are larger than the projec tions 8, and the interstices l l between these latter projections also are of smaller depth than the interstices l2, 12 between the projections 8, so as to obtain a reinforcement at the rear end of the heel also subjected to increased wear.

It is apparent from the drawing, that the projections 2, 3 and 4 of the sole, and the projections 8, 9 and H! of the heel I are of such shape and so disposed, that no through-passing straight interstices extending to the edge of the sole, which would favour slipping are present in any direction in the plane of the sole. Moreover, the projections 2 and 8 of the sole l and of the heel l are formed with interstices having re-entering angles 6" and I2 the points of which are forwardly directed at the sole and rearwardly at the heel, in order to produce opposed wedging effects on the sole and on the heel to increase the security against slipping. Owing to this arrangement, when mounting with shoes equipped with the represented sole, the non-slip features of the sole are particularly effective, while when descending the non-slip features of the heel are effective.

As can be seen from Figs. 3 and 4, the lateral limiting surfaces of the narrower interstices 6' between the projections 2 of a pair of projections have a greater conicity than the lateral limiting surfaces of the larger interstices between the pair of projections 2, the distances a in Fig. 4 being greater than the distances b. Also at the heel the lateral limiting surfaces of the interstices l2 between the projections 8 have a greater conicity than the lateral limiting surfaces of the larger interstices l2 between the pairs of proections 8. This arrangement facilitates expelling of small articles clamped between the projections when walking, such as small stones.

The portion of the sole between the projections 2 and the heel can be provided with the manufacturers trade-mark, which may consist of relieved letters formed in the material of the sole, so as to obtain a security against sliding also at this portion of the sole.

I claim:

1. A rubber sole for sports shoes having a tread surface provided with zigzag-shaped projections along the lateral marginal portions of the sole, a heel surface also provided with zigzag-shaped projections along the lateral marginal portions thereof, said projections on the sole and on the heel being separated by interstices forming retions formed on the lateral marginal portions of the sole and the heel, the projections on the front end of the sole and on the rear end of the heel being separated by interstices of smaller depth 10 than that of the interstices formed between the projections provided between the lateral marginal portions of the sole and the heel.

shaped projections along the lateral marginal portions thereof, said projections on the sole and on the heel being arranged in pairs separated by interstices, and the projections of one pair being separated by narrower interstices than those separatingthe pairs of projections, said interstices having inclined lateral'li'miting surfaces and forming re -entering angles having the points thereof forwardly directed at the sole and rearwardly directed at the'heel, the lateral limiting surfaces ef the narrower interstices between 2. A rubber sole forsports shoes having atread surface provided with zigzag-shaped projections along the lateral marginal portions of the sole,

I 15 tions; 1 r and a heel surface also provided with zigzagtwo projections of one 'pair having a greater conicity than=thlaterallimiting surfaces of the larger interlsticesf'between the pairs of projec FRITZ, AP ELER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2722756 *Nov 13, 1951Nov 8, 1955Gro Cord Rubber CompanyCleated shoe sole
US2833057 *Jun 21, 1957May 6, 1958Ripple Sole CorpResilient shoe soles
US2888756 *Jun 11, 1958Jun 2, 1959Parsons Neal ByronSole for football shoes
US4777738 *Aug 12, 1986Oct 18, 1988The Stride Rite CorporationSlip-resistant sole
US6457264Feb 14, 2001Oct 1, 2002Adidas International B.V.Spike for an athletic shoe
US6519879 *Dec 4, 2000Feb 18, 2003HyiGolf shoe soft spike/cleat design
US6957503Sep 3, 2003Oct 25, 2005Adidas International Marketing, B.V.Magnetically operable studs for footwear
US6973745 *Nov 6, 2003Dec 13, 2005Elan-Polo, Inc.Athletic shoe having an improved cleat arrangement
US7481009Jul 29, 2005Jan 27, 2009Adidas International Marketing B.V.Magnetically operable studs for footwear
US8215035Jun 14, 2004Jul 10, 2012Elan-Polo, Inc.Athletic shoe having an improved cleat arrangement and improved cleat
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00C, D02/957
International ClassificationA43B13/14, A43B13/22
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/223
European ClassificationA43B13/22B