Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2396257 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 12, 1946
Filing dateFeb 16, 1944
Priority dateFeb 16, 1944
Publication numberUS 2396257 A, US 2396257A, US-A-2396257, US2396257 A, US2396257A
InventorsFould Maurice P
Original AssigneeFould Maurice P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building construction
US 2396257 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March'12j194s. F L 2,396,257

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. 16, 1944' 2 Sheets-Skieet 1 Fould -e64 9% March 12, 1946. M FQULD BUILDING CONSTRUCTION '2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 16, 1944 MauriceB Fould Patented Mar. 12, 1946 r UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE BUILDING CONSTRUCTION Maurice P. Fould, Sharon, Pa.

Application February 16, 1944, Serial No. 522,636

13 Claims.

, This invention relates to the construction of walls, partitions or the like from prefabricated units and more particularly to a method of erecting and the construction of a composite assembly comprised of spaced posts or supporting members with which are associated a plurality of panel sheets to form a single composite unit.

While the invention may in some respects be regarded as an improvement over certain structural arrangements illustrated in my earlier issued Patents No. 2,164,681, July 4, 1939, and Nos. 2,263,354 and 2,263,355, November 18, 1941, the invention in its basic aspects is considerably broader.

Among the broad objects of the invention is simplification in the field of prefabricated constructions and to this end I have devised a system of component interlocking wall member units or sheets which may be so associated with spaced supporting members that a component sheet of standard size may be assembled with standard posts to construct a wall or partition of any desired height. Thus with a few simple units it is possible to build walls and partitions having a wide range of dimensions and to select the most effective distance between supporting posts for insuring maximum strength and rigidity, at the same time producing a continuous wall or partition with as few breaks or interruptions in continuity of surface as possible.

By using a series of sheets of substantially greater horizontal than vertical dimension in vertically overlapped relation to one another and joining each sheet at its ends to a supporting post in the manner generally described in my earlier issued patents, these objectives may be obtained.

Among other broad objects of the invention is simplification of the manner in which these units are assembled to form a rigid composite unit, eliminating to a large extent the use of connecting members of any sort and the consequent labor and expense associated therewith. For purposes of illustration, although by no means by way of limitation, I have illustrated this invention in conjunction with the particular interlocking structure disclosed in my aforesaid earlier issued patents wherein supporting members or posts are provided with longitudinally extending recesses or locking slots of a particular configuration together with sheets, along each edge of which extends a cooperating tongue conforming in general to the configuration of the post recess and permitting ready insertion with effective interlock when inserted, all as described more fully in the aforesaid patents.

The means for accomplishing the objects set forth herein posed the problem of so interlocking the tongues of the sheets with the recesses in the supporting members as to prevent overlapped component sheets of the composite panel from sliding down over the sheets immediately below them. As will be brought out more clearly and in detail hereinafter, my solution lies in so proportioning the vertical dimension of each sheet, along the edge of which the interlocking tongue extends, and the thickness of the sheet or, more particularly, the tongue in relation to the width of the recess in the supporting member that the tongues of adjacent overlapped sheets wedge against one another and against the walls of the recess, thus precluding relative sliding movement of the sheets in a vertical direction beyond a predetermined extent.

Among other objects of the invention is rigidification of a multilateral wall or partition constructed in the manner broadly described above, which involves the use of tension members connecting the posts to one another. As a further aid to rigidification and strength I propose to use, in some instances, resilient means bearing against the sheets, thus offsetting any tendency to flex the sheets out of their normal plane, which might tend to separate the interlock of the tongues within the post recesses. This may be accomplished by the use of a biased spring locking strip fixed at one end and extending across the overlapped faces of the panel sheets, the bias of said locking member being in the direction toward the sheets and the other end of said member being secured in suitable manner to bear against the face of the uppermost of the vertically overlapped sheets.

Various other objects and meritorious features of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the drawings, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout the several figures, and wherein:

Figure 1 is a front elevation of my improved composite assembly; I

Fig. 2 is a top plan view thereof;

Fig. 3 is a vertical section through 3-3 of Fi 2;

Fig. 4 is a vertical section through 4-4 of Fig.

Fig. 5 is a plan view of one form of post or supporting member;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. with the panel sheets interlocked therewith;

Fig. 7 is a perspective of one of the component panel sheets;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged vertical section through the lowermost overlapped panel sheets;

Fig. 9 illustrates the utilization of tension members for connecting the vertical supporting members;

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 6 illustrating the assembly in conjunction with a corner post;

Fig. 11 is a somewhat diagrammatic illustration in elevation of roof siding constructed in accordance with my invention;

Fig. 12 illustrates, likewise somewhat diagra nmaticaly, flooring laid in accordance with the invention, and

Fig. 13 is a perspective of a cornerpost.

Referring now to the drawings and more particularly to Fig. 1, the numeral Ii] illustrates broadly a horizontal support or flooring upon which relatively rigid supporting posts i2 are Vertically positioned in some suitable fashion. Whether these posts or supporting members are of the type l2 illustrated Figs. 5 and 6 or corner posts. l of the type illustrated in Figs. 9 and 13. is immaterial insofar as the invention is concerned. They may be fashioned of sheet material in any desired manner and each is provided with a pair of recesses l6 of the type particularly described in my Patent No. 2,263,355 and formed with an inwardly curved seating portion It together with a straight portion constituting a partial chord of the arc defined by the curved portion It. The partial chord forms with one extremity of the arc IS an opening into the recess through which a tongue broadly designated by the numeral 22, one of which is located at each end of each panel sheet 24, is adapted to interlock after insertion in the recess 16, the arc of curvature of the tongue being substantially the same asthearc of curved portion it of the recess and of a length which will fit snugly around the major ;portion of the .recess curvature when the tongue is fully inserted in said recess.

Itis immaterial, as hitherto suggested, how the sheets are fashioned or how the posts or supporting members are fashioned. It is of dis,-

tinct importance, however, that the opening to recess i6, designated by the letter as in Fig. 5, beof a width somewhat less than three but more than two times the thickness of the tongue 22 to be inserted therein. The reason for this will be more clearly brought out hereinafter.

-While the panel sheets 24 may be constructed of any suitable material, certain phases of my in vention require employment of a resilient and flexible material such as sheet metal and to obtain maximum rigidity and security of interlock these sheets should be of a length somewhat greater than the distance between adjacent posts, or the recesses therein, with which the sheets are to be associated to form a composite structure.

In assembling, the end portions of an initial sheet 24', which is preferably about one-half as wide as the other sheets 24 of the assembly, are flexed and the end tongues thereof are inserted in the recesses 16. As illustrated in Figs. 3, 4 and 8, this narrower sheet is positioned at the bottom of the assembly and rests upon supportin S rface ID. The next sheet 24 for positioning immediately above sheet 24' and in overlapped relation thereto is inserted in similar manner and is slid down the continuous recesses l6 of adjacent posts until it overlaps sheet 24' and the tongues 22 ofsheet 24 overlap the tongues 22 of sheet 26', thus wedging the tongues against one another and against the side walls of recesses IS. The vertical or transverse dimensions of sheet 2% and sheet 24 are such that when so positioned the sheet 24 substantially covers the bottom sheet 2 3'.

Thereafter duplicates of sheet 24 are successively positioned in recesses IS in the manner heretofore described. After each sheet is positioned in the recesses it is moved downwardly until it abuts the sheet immediately therebelow, or at least until the tongues 22 of the respective sheets abut. The last inserted sheet is then tapped gently to force it downwardly somewhat against the increasing resistance caused by the wedging of the two interlocked tongues 22 against oneanother and against the walls of the recesses 16.

An important feature of the invention resides not only in the proportioning of the thickness of tongues 22 and the widtha; of the entranceinto recesses; 16 but in proportioning the vertical or transverse dimension of the sheets 22 with reference to said other dimensions in such manner that each successive overlapped sheet covers about half of the one immediately below. As a result of this an e ent gcqm p te a structure h u hout filibsi n all l t en Surface is of dual thickness, i. e., twice the thickness of the Sheets I 9.1 stren th an its attendant rigidityare not necessary,-itis of course possible to vary the-proportions somewhat to provide for less overlapof the sheets and consequently obtain a cheaper construction with the use of less sheet m te al- Referring now particularly to my improved ar. rangement whereby a multilateral wall or partition of great rigidity and strength is obtained through use of the hitherto described phases of m in ention, attention is directed to Fig. 9 of the drawings wherein tension members 26 connect each of four corner posts I4 with each of the other three posts, These tension members have been illustrated in; the form of wires or rods riveted or other wise secured to the posts and provided intermediate their length with some mechanism, such asturnbuckles 28, for adjusting thetension therein. While in theform illustrated the corner posts are not only connected directly to each of the adjacent posts but alsoconnected to the post diagonallyoppositethequadrangular layout, it is not essential in every construction to include all the tension members illustrated. The particular manner of tensioningbetween posts depends to a great extent upon the particular type of construction and its purpose.

These tensioning means are preferably positioned prior to inserting the panel sheets in the Pest and are .pre c ab ylco t the os at points either above or below the. ceiling or w Please res ec vely.- I som ins it y b isab e i9 cs tiqn ccsioni means bothaboveand beiowthe ceiling and floor planes, respectively. h

It will beapparent that when using panel sheets zeconstructed of flexible and resilient material which when deformed and inserted between the nest will ee to s ea the sa e the ns means o e a t. ishiecdecc and d whatev r t. osiiiqi ns means arc medi nsur i it fi staasr c n i cnfip each os he her r d cr bed. summ ries of ne sheets 25, which of course is maintained after insertion of; a resilient panel sheetin recesses 1'3 of adjacent posts, creates somewhat of a bulge or longitudinal convexity in the wall. While the normal tendency of each sheet 24 to flex back to its normal plane functions quite adequately in many instances to maintain the interlock between tongues 22 and recesses l6, any accidental displacement of the panel sheets is obviated by means of a lock strip 38.

In Fig. 4 I have illustrated a suitable form of lock strip which is of flexible resilient material normally biased in a direction opposite to the bulge in the sheets when positioned between the posts. The upper extremity of spring lock strip 38 may be fashioned into hook form as indicated at 32 andhung over the top panel sheet as illustrated. The lower portion of the strip is then forced inwardly against the face of the overlapped sheets, extending transversel thereacross in the direction of wall height, and secured in any suitable fashion in the base support it. This may be accomplished by forcing the lower extremity of lock strip 3i! into the groove or slot in the base, as illustrated, or a finishing strip may be secured to the base flush with the bottom strip.

In Fig. 11 I have illustrated somewhat diagranp matically the possibilities of using my improved construction features and method in forming roof siding broadly illustrated by the numeral 32. The only substantial difference from standard sheet construction for such purpose would be the necessity of angling the tongues 22 with reference to the longitudinal median line of the sheet to conform with the angularit of the roof gables 34.

In Fig. 12 I have illustrated, again somewhat diagrammatically, flooring constructed and assembled with the same units and in the manner hitherto described in detail.

While I have described an embodiment of my invention in conjunction with the specific forms illustrated, it will be apparent that various modifications of such structure lie within the purview of the inventive concept and for that reason I Wish to be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a wall, partition, or the like, the Com-- bination of spaced, fixed supporting members ly ing in a single plane having longitudinally extending continuous recesses, and a plurality of panel sheets each having a tongue extending along its opposite edges and engaged respectively in the recesses of said supporting members, said tongues being inclined slightly with reference to the side walls of said recesses, said sheets and tongues being vertically overlapped and held in such position relative to each other and the supporting members by the wedging action of overlapped tongues against each other and the walls of said recesses, said tongues being straight along their dimensions most nearly parallel to the walls of said recesses.

2. In a wall, partition, or the like, the combination of spaced, fixed supporting members lying in a single plane having longitudinally extending continuous recesses, and a plurality of resilient panel sheets of greater width than the distance between the recesses in said supporting members each having a tongue extending along its opposite edges and engaged, respectively, in the recesses of said supporting members, said tongues being inclined slightl with reference to the side walls of said recesses, said tongues being vertically overlapped and held in such position relative to each other and the supporting members by the of the locking wedging action of overlapped tongues against each other and the walls of said recesses.

3. In a wall, partition, or the like, the combination of spaced, fixed supporting members lying in a single plane having longitudinally extending continuous recesses, a plurality of resilient panel sheets of greater width than the distance between the recesses in said supporting members each having a tongue extending along its opposite edges and engaged, respectively, in the recesses of said supportmg members, said tongues being inclined slightly with reference to the side walls of said recesses, said tongues being verticall overlapped and held in such position relative to each other and the supporting members by the wedging action of overlapped tongues against each other and the walls of said recesses, and a spring locking member fixedly positioned at one end extending across the overlapped faces of said sheets in contact therewith and secured at the other end to one of the sheets.

4. In a composite wall, partition, or the like, the combination of spaced, fixed supporting members lying in a single plane having longitudinally extending continuous recesses, and a plurality of component panel sheets each having a tongue extending in a straight line along its opposite edges and engaged, respectively, in the recesses of said supporting members, said recesses being of a Width more than twice but less than three times the thickness of the tongues, the sheets and tongues being vertically overlapped to thereby wedge the tongues thereof against each other and the walls of said recesses.

5. A multilateral wall construction comprising spaced, vertically positioned, longitudinally recessed supporting members, tension members connecting said supporting members beyond the -ceil1ng or floor plane, and resilient wall sheets of greater length than the space between recesses in adjacent supporting members and having tongues at each end, said sheets being flexed out of their normal plane with the tongues engaging the recesses of adjacent supporting members to thereby place said tension members under tension.

6. A multilateral wall construction comprising spaced, vertically positioned, longitudinally recessed supporting members, tension members connecting said supporting members beyond the ceiling or floor plane, and resilient wall sheets of greater length than the space between recesses in adjacent supporting members and having tongues at each end, said sheets being flexed out of their normal plane with thetongues engaging the recesses of adjacent supporting members to thereby place said tension members under tension, said tension members including means for varying the tension therein.

7. A multilateral wall construction comprising spaced, vertically positioned, longitudinally recessed supporting members, tension members connecting each of said supporting members with each other supporting member beyond the ceiling or floor plane, and resilient wall sheets of greater length than the space between recesses in adjacent supporting members and having tongues at each end, said sheets being flexed out of their normal plane with the tongues engaging the recesses of adjacent supporting members to thereby place said tension members under tension.

8. A multilateral wall construction comprising spaced, vertically i positioned, longitudinally recessed supporting members, tension members connecting said supporting members beyond the ceiling or floor plane, a plurality-of vertically overlapped resilient wall sheets ofgreater leng'th than the space between recesses inadjacent supporting members and having tongues'at'each end, said sheets..being flexed out of their normal plane with. the tongues engaging the recesses of adjacent supporting members to thereby place said tension members under tension, and a, spring locking member .fiXedly positioned at oneend extending across the ;overlapped facesc. of said sheets in. contact therewith-and secured at the other-end to one of the sheets. i

'9. That-method of assembling a multilateral wall between spaced; vertically positionect -longitudinally recessed supporting members and consisting oftongued resilient wall sheets greater in length than the space between recesses' inedjacent-supporting members, which comprises the steps of tying the supporting members together by tension members lying in aplane beyond the ceiling or floor plane, and insertingoppositely disposed tongues of each sheet in-the recesses of adjacent supporting members to thereby place thetensionmeans under tension through the flexure of said sheets.

'10."'Ihat method of assembling a multilateral wall between spaced, vertically positioned, longitudinallyrecessed supporting members and consisting of tongued resilientwall sheets greater in length than thespace between recesses in'adjacent-supporting members, which-comprises the steps of tying each supporting member to each other supporting member by tension members lying in a plane beyond the'ceiling or floor plane,

and inserting oppositely disposed tongues of each sheet in the recesses of adjacent supporting'mem- 'bers' to therebyplace the tension means under tension through the fiexure oi -said sheets.

11. Phat method or" assembling'a multilateral wall between spaced, vertically-positioned, longitudinally recessed supporting members and consisting of vertically overlapped, tonguedgresilient wallsheets 'greater inlength than the space between recesses in-ad-j acent supporting members. which comprises the steps of tying the supporting members together by tension members lying in a. plane" beyond the ceiling or=-floor"plane, inserting oppositely disposed tongues of each sheet in the recesses of adj acentsupporting members to thereby place the tension means under tension through: the :fiexure-of said sheets, and positioning a resilient locking strip fixedat one end and biased toexerta force in a direction opposite to the bulge inthe wall sheets transversely across andagainst the overlapped sheets.

12. That method of assembling a-wall, partition, or the like, between spaced, vertically posi- .tioned,.longitudinally recessed supporting members andconsisting of resilient wall sheets greater in length than .thespace between recesses in adjacent. supporting members and having tongues at ea'chend of a, thickness less than the width of thezrecesslentrances, which'comprises the steps of 'insertingoppositely disposed tongues of one sheet in the recesses of adjacent supporting members while flexing the sheets longitudinally, doing likewise :with another sheetabovethe previously positioned sheet, sliding the last inserted sheet intoioverlapping relation to the one previously inserted until corresponding tongues of the overlapped sheets are wedged against each other and against the walls oftheir'respective recesses, and continuing with successive sheets until the desired wall height is reached.

1-3. That method of assembling a wall, partition, or the like, between spaced, vertically positioned, longitudinally recessedsupporting members and consisting of resilient wall sheets greater in length than the space between recesses in adjacent supporting members and'having tongues at each end of a thickness less than the width of the recess entrances, which comprises the steps of inserting oppositely disposed tongues of one sheet in the recesses of adjacent sup-porting members, doing likewisewithanother sheet above the previously positioned sheet, sliding the last inserted sheet into overlapping relation to the one previously inserted until corresponding tongues of the overlapped sheets are wedged against each other and against the walls of their respective recesses, continuing with successive sheets until the desired wall height is reached, and applying pressure exerting means across and against the overlapped faces of said sheets to offset any bulging of the wall due to the flexing of the sheets.

lvlAURICE P. FOULD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2710079 *Jul 28, 1950Jun 7, 1955Black Sivalls & Bryson IncVentilated wall structure for buildings
US3224154 *Jul 24, 1963Dec 21, 1965Toti Andrew JStructural assembly construction
US3355852 *Nov 12, 1963Dec 5, 1967Fire Trol CorpFireproof building column assemblies
US3415543 *Jul 8, 1965Dec 10, 1968Henry M. KeatingCoupling frame
US3503172 *Jan 29, 1968Mar 31, 1970Beguin Gilbert HEdge-joined sheet material
US3760551 *Jan 22, 1971Sep 25, 1973Konig GStructural assembly
US3789568 *Sep 1, 1972Feb 5, 1974Mattix JMethod of applying a panel system utilizing a concealed corner locking clip
US4261144 *Jul 5, 1979Apr 14, 1981Rhw, Inc.Vertical corner post for screened-in room structure
DE1198517B *Aug 6, 1957Aug 12, 1965Loeoef Nils Oskar THalteschiene zum Befestigen von wandhohen Blechtafeln an einer Tragkonstruktion
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/478, 52/282.3, 52/278, 52/549, 52/748.11, 285/424, 52/551, 52/472, 52/762, 52/459
International ClassificationE04B2/78, E04B2/76
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/78
European ClassificationE04B2/78