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Publication numberUS2396999 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1946
Filing dateFeb 22, 1945
Priority dateFeb 22, 1945
Publication numberUS 2396999 A, US 2396999A, US-A-2396999, US2396999 A, US2396999A
InventorsGeorge Frank C
Original AssigneeGeorge Frank C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Block molding machine
US 2396999 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 19, 1946. F. c. GEORGE 2,396,999

\ BLOCK MOLDINC MACHINE F iled Feb. -2 2, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 w? 2 B u 6 ./v6 L3 LLL in x mm M if I 7 I T 8 J 1 4 a: 1 :1 ml m fllmi m March 19, 1946. c. GEQRGE 2,396,999

BLOCK MOLDING MACHINE Filed Feb. 22, 1945. 2 Sheets-Sheet? Patented Mar. 19, 1946 UNITE-D STATES PATENT, OFFICE Application February 22, 1945, Serial No. 579,187

7 Claims.

This invention relates to a machine for molding building blocks from plastic materials, such as concrete and the like, and has for its general object to provide a simple practical machine for this purpose which is thoroughly reliable and highly eflicient in operation, particularly from the standpoint of insuring a dense or closely packed condition of the material comprising the blocks.

According to one phase of the invention and to the end of insuring densification of the material comprising the blocks, the present machine includes a resiliently supported mold box and means for shaking the same to cause the loose material deposited therein to settle or densify, and in this connection a special and important object of the invention is to provide a novel, three-point, resilient suspension for the mold box whereby it is supported in proper operative position and yet is permitted to rock or tilt in different directions responsive to shaking thereof to insure rapid and most effective packing or densification of material deposited therein to form the blocks.

The mold box may be devoid of cores, in which event the formed blocks will be solid. Preferably, however, the mold box is provided with cores whereby the formed blocks are hollow, and in this connection another special and important object of the invention is to resiliently mount the cores, independently of the resilient mounting of the mold box, for rocking or tilting movements relative to the mold box in response to'operation of the shaking means, to further insure rapid, efiective packing or densification of the material comprising the blocks.

Another special and important object of the invention is to provide simple, practical, reliable, easily operated means for ejecting formed blocks from the mold.

Another special and important objection is to provide simple, practical means for supplying predetermined amounts of plastic material from tical means for releasably fastening the pan securely to the mold box in overlying relationship thereto so as to cause it to partake of shaking movements with the mold box without any looseness and rattling relative thereto.

With, the foregoing and other objects in view,

which will become more fully apparent as the.

nature of the invention is better understood the same consists in a block molding machine embodying the novel features of construction, combination and arrangement of parts as will be hereinafter more fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings and defined in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings, wherein like characters of reference denote corresponding parts in the different views:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a block molding machine constructed in accordance with one practical embodiment of the invention.

Figure 2 is atop plan view of the machine, the pan'for'supplying material to the mold box being shown partly in'section.

Figure 3 is a vertical, longitudinal section through the machine.

Figure 4 is a transverse, section through the machine; and

Figure 5 is a fragmentary end view of the machine.

Referring to the drawings in detail, A designates, generally, the frame of the machine which may be formed from angle-iron, as shown, or from any other suitable material and which may comprise, as shown, a pair of laterally spaced part, longitudinally extending lower side members l0, suitable uprights ll rising therefrom, and a pair of laterally spaced apart, longitudinally extending upper side members l2 supported by the uprights H and connected together by suitable transverse members 13.

The frame A is rigid and the mold box, designated generally as B, is disposed above the front end portion thereof and is resiliently supported by the same, preferably at three points, whereby it is held in proper operative position and yet is permitted to tilt or rock in different directions responsive to vibratory or shaking movements imparted thereto.

While any suitable means may be employed t provide the three-point support or suspension for the mold box B, simple, practical means for this purpose may consist, as shown, of a leaf spring [4 supporting said box medially at its front end, and a pair of spring arms I5, l5 supporting said box at laterally spaced points at its rear end.

The leaf spring [4 may extend transversely of the frame A at the front end thereof and may be suitably fastened at its ends to said frame as inmanner to the mold box at the front end and midway between the sides and preferably near the bottom thereof, as indicated at l1, all as shown in the drawings. 'On the other hand, the spring various diilerent directions when it is shaken.

While any suitable means may be provided to shake the mold box 13, a simple, practical means for this purpose may comprise an eccentrically weighted shaft 2i suitably mounted on the mold box and driven by an electric motor 22 suitably mounted upon the frame A. In this connection and as illustrated in the drawings, the motor 22 may be mounted upon the upper, rear portion of the frame A; a pair of bars 23 may extend longitudinally or the machine in underlying relationship to the mold box B to which they may be welded or otherwise rigidly fastened in any suitable manner; the eccentrically weighted shaft 2| may extend transversely oi the machine beyond a the rear end the mold box and may be journaled for rotation in suitable bearings carried by the rear ends of the bars 23; and a belt 24 may connect pulleys 25 and 26 on the motor shalt and said eccentrically weighted shaft, respectively, whereby the latter is driven by said motor. The shaft 2i is eccentrically weighted as indicated at 21, and responsive to rotation of said shaft the mold box obviously will be shaken due to the bars 23, upon which said shaft is mounted, being rigid with said box.

While the mold box B may be devoid of cores so that solid blocks may be formed therein, it preferably is provided with cores for forming in the blocks openings extending from side to side thereof. Moreover, while the mold box may be of a size and shape to iormonly a single block during a single cycle of operation of the machine, it preferably is of a size and shape to form two or more blocks during each cycle of operation of the ma-.

chine. In this connection and as illustrated in the present instance, the mold box is of a size and shape to have two blocks formed therein during each cycle of operation of the machine. In other words, according to the specific construction illustrated in the present instance, said mold box Depending upon the desired number of open- B has therein two cores, designated as 23, which are rectangular in shape and disposed vertically and spaced equidistantly from each other and from the sides and the ends, respectively, of the compartment. Moreover, said cores are oi approximately the same height as the mold box.

Thus, ea'chblock has formed therein two rectangular openings extending from top to bottom thereof.

In accordance with the invention the cores 23 are supported resiliently relative to the mold box B for rocking or tilting movements relative thereto in response to the shaking action of the mold box produced by the ecoentrically weighted shalt 2|. In this connection, while said cores may be resiliently mounted in any suitable manner, one simple and practical manner of resiliently mounting them is upon the bars 23 through the instrumentality of pairs of U-shaped springs 30, as best shown in Figure 4 of the drawings. To each side of each core 29, medially thereof and at its bottom, is welded or otherwise suitably fastened the upper end of the outer arm of a spring 30, while to the upper ends of the two inner arms of the two springs related to each core is welded or otherwise suitably fastened a connecting plate 3| which is bolted or otherwise suitably fastened to the related bar 23. Accordingly, the springs 30 in conjunction with the bars 23 serve both to properly position the cores in the mold box and to resiliently support the cores for rocking or tilting movements responsive to operation of the eccentricaily weighted shaft 2|.

While the cores 26 may be of any suitable form,

they preferably are of light weight, hollow, closed side and top, open-bottom form as shown. To prevent material supplied to the mold box B from falling therethrough, a closure 32 is provided for the bottom of each of the two compartments of said mold box, while in order to elect finished blocks from said mold box, means is provided for moving said closures upwardly through said mold box.

The closures 32 are of sizes to fit the respective compartments of the mold-box and, ii the mold box is not provided with cores, said closures may simply be in the form of plates. If, however, the mold box is provided with cores, the closures 32 will have openings therein to accommodate the cores and they will, therefore, be of grid-like form as shown. In any event, each closure 32 is mounted upon the upper ends of vertical rods 33 v which extend through guide openings in the bars 23 and which, at their lower ends, are welded or oizherwise suitably fastened to a common frame 3 Carried by the frame 34 at opposite sides thereof are rollers 35 which are disposed between pairs of the uprights ll whereby saidframe is guided for vertical movement, while underlying said rollers are pivoted cam arms 36 which, by upward and rearward swinging movements thereof, are efiective to raise said rollers and thus raise the frame 34 and the closures 32 carried thereby. Downwardswinging movement of the cam arms is suitably limited whereby they serve as stops to predetermine the limits or downward movement of the closures 32, and when said closures are at their limits of downward movement they ar disposed at the bottom of the mold box as shown. on the other hand, the cam arms are effective, when swung upwardly, to raise the closures 32 suitable distances above the top of the mold box B to completely eject formed blocks from said mold box for subsequent easy removal from the machine simply by sliding them off of said closures onto any suitable platform or support which may be provided to receive them.

The cam arms 36 may be carried by a shaft 31 extending transversel of the machine at the bottom thereof and journaled in suitable bearings carried by the lower frame members l0, and said shaft may be provided with a suitable lever arm 33 for effecting its rotation to swing said cam arms to raise th closures 32. On the other hand, the unit comprising the closures 32, the rods 33, the frame 34 and the rollers 35 may gravitate to its lowered position or, if desired, may have suitable spring means connected therewith to assist inmoving it to its lowered position when the cam arms are swung to permit it to move downwardly. In fact, there may be positive connections between the cam arms 36 or their equivalents and the closures 32 whereby the latter are positively moved downwardly as well as upwardly.

While plastic material may be supplied to the Y mold box B in any suitable manner, means prefunderlying said hopper and a position overlying said mold box.

When the pan 40 underlies the hopper 39, material may be supplied thereto from sair hopper and the material will be prevented from passing through said pan by the plate 20 underlying the same. On the other hand, when said pan is shifted into overlying relationship to the open top of the mold box B, the material contained in said pan will gravitate through the open bottom thereof into the mold box. Extending rearwardly from the pan 40 at the top thereof is a plate 4] which moves beneath the hopper 39- and cuts ofi flow of material therefrom as the pan is shifted from its position beneath said hopper to its position overlying the mold box. Manifestly, therefore, a measured amount of material is supplied to the mold box B each time the pan 40 is shifted.

While any suitable means may be provided for shifting the pan 40, a simple, practical-means for this purpose may consist, as shown of a lever arm 42 pivoted at a suitable point to the frame A for forward and rearward swinging movements and connected to said pan by suitable links 43. In this connection, both the lever arm 42 and the lever arm 38 referably are located adjacent to one another near the front end of the machin so as to be in convenient reach of an operator standing in front of the machine.

It is desirable that the pan 40 remain above and be shaken with the mold box during shaking of the latter to feed material thereto as the material therein settles and densifies. Therefore, it is further desirable to providemeans to temporarily fasten said pan securely to mold box in overlying relationship thereto, not only to insure shaking of said pan with the mold box, but to avoid undesirable looseness and'rattling of said pan. In this connection it will be noted that the mold box is surrounded and reinforced at its top by angle-iron members 44, and that the flanges of these members serve as supports for the pan 40 when said pan is disposed in overlying relationship to said mold box. It will further be noted that strips 45-overlie the outer marginal portions of the flanges of the angle-iron members 44 at the sides of the mold box and also the marginal side portions of the plate 20 and serve as guides to provide a slidewayfor the pan 40 and to hold the latter against lateral movement relative to said plate 20 and the mold box. In addition, it will be noted that rods 46 are spaced above and overlie the guide strips 45 and that lugs 41 project from the sides of the mold box between said sti ps 45 and said rods 46. It is apparent, therefore, that by downward movement of the rods 46 the lugs 41 may be clamped between said rods 46 and the strips 45 to fasten the pan 40 securely to the mold box B.

The rods 46 are suitably fastened at their rear ends to the plate 20 and at their front ends are provided with downwardly directed lugs 48, while fastened to the front end of the mold box B, midway between its sides and near its top, is a lug 49. Extending transversely across the front end of the mold box B and through the lugs 48 and 49 is a rod or shaft 50 which medially is slightly bent so that it is of shallow V-shape and therefore is in the. nature of a crank, and which is provided with a suitable handle 5| for effecting its rotation. Accordingly, by rotating said shaft to a given angular position, the rods 46 may be lifted at their front ends and the pan-carried lugs 41 will be free to slide between the strips 45 and said rods 46. On the other hand, by rotating said shaft to another angular position, the rods 46 may be drawn downwardly to clamp the lugs 41 between the same and the strips 45 and thus fasten the pan 40 securely relative to the mold box.

In the operation of the machine, the pan 40 is shifted from beneath the hopper into overlying relationshipto the mold box B to supply material to the latter. The pan 40 then is clamped to the mold box and the motor 22 is operated for the required period of time to obtain desired densification of the material in the mold box, which densification is greatly expedited by the threepoint resilient suspension of the mold box and the resilient suspension of the cores 29 relative to said mold box. The pan 4!! then is released and returned to its position beneath the hopper 39 to receive a fresh charge of material therefrom and the closure 32 for the bottoms of the mold box compartments are raised to lift the formed blocks from the mold box. The blocks then are removed from the closures 32 and the latter are returned to their lower positions, whereupon the machine is readied for a subsequent cycle of operation. a

From the foregoing description considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, it is believed that the construction and operation of the machine will be clearly understood and its advantages appreciated. It is desired to point out, however, that while only a single, specific structural embodiment of the invention has been illus-' trated and described, the same is readily capable of various specifically different structural embodiments within its spirit and scope as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A machine for molding blocks from plastic material comprising a mold box, means resiliently supporting said mold box at only three spaced points, and means for shaking said box.

2. A machine for molding blocks from plastic material comprising a mold box, means resiliently supporting said box at not more and not less than three spaced points, cores within and resiliently supported by said mold box, and means for shalting said mold box.

3. A machine for molding blocks from plastic material comprising a rigid frame, a mold box, a leaf spring extendingtransversely relative to said frame and supported at its ends thereon, asupporting connection between said mold box at one end thereof and a medial portion of said spring, a pair of spring arms between said frame and said box supporting the letter at its other end and adjacent to opposite sides thereof, respectively, and means for shaking said box.

4:. A machine for molding blocks from plastic material comprising a resiliently supported opentop mold box including a plate flush-with its top and extending beyond one end, thereof, an openbottoinpan slidable from a material-receiving position overlying said plate to a position overlying said mold box for delivery of material tlier from to the mold box, lugs extending from. the sides of said pan, rods overlying said lugs, means for drawing said rods downwardly to clamp said pan to said mold box, and means for shaking said mold box and said pan.

5. A machine for molding bloclzs from plastic material comprising a rigid frame, a mold box,

spring means resiliently supporting said box medially at one end upon said frame, other spring means resiliently supporting said box at its other end and adjacent to its sides, respectiveiy, upon said frame, and means for shawng said box.

assaoee 6. A machine for molding blocks from plastic material comprising a rigid frame, a mold box, spring means resiliently supporting said box medially at one end thereof, a pair oi vertically disposed spring arms having laterally disposed lower ends Sastened to said frame and laterally disposed izpmr ends supporting said mold box at its other end and adjacent to the sides thereoi, res actively, and means for shaking said box.

"2. A machine for molding blocks from plastic materiai comprising a resiliently supported opentop mold box including a plate flush with its top and extending beyond one end thereof, an open= bottom slidable from a material-receiving position overlying said plate to a position overlying said mold box for delivery of material therefrom to the mold box, lugs extending from the sides of said pan, rods overlying 'said lugs, said rods easn being secured at one end to said mold box and having its other end free for upward and downward movement, a bowed shaft extending transversely of said mold box and rotatably mounted at a medial point thereon and connected adjacent to its ends to the free ends of said rods for rotation to draw said rods downwardly against said lugs and thus clamp said pan securei" to said mold box for vibration therewith, and means for vibrating said mold box.

FRANK C. GEGRGE,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2529066 *Jun 17, 1946Nov 7, 1950Annas Taft TBlock molding machine
US2537447 *Sep 29, 1948Jan 9, 1951Di Stefano PeterApparatus and method for molding concrete vaults and the like
US2572830 *May 18, 1949Oct 30, 1951Appleby Frederick TMachine for molding concrete blocks
US2612276 *Aug 5, 1947Sep 30, 1952Claytor Carl WUnloading mechanism for concrete block molding machines
US3213511 *Apr 10, 1962Oct 26, 1965S & S Mfg CoCement block machine
US4207041 *Aug 9, 1978Jun 10, 1980Kampiziones Theodore GMobile cement block making machine
US5059110 *Jul 21, 1989Oct 22, 1991Columbia Machine, Inc.Apparatus for forming concrete blocks having plural separately driven vibrator sets
US5219591 *Oct 18, 1991Jun 15, 1993Columbia Machine, Inc.Apparatus for forming concrete blocks
US5277853 *Apr 5, 1993Jan 11, 1994Allison J DennisMethod for forming concrete blocks
US5395228 *Feb 7, 1994Mar 7, 1995Columbia Machine, Inc.Apparatus for forming concrete products
US5503546 *Jul 28, 1994Apr 2, 1996Columbia Machine, Inc.Apparatus for forming concrete products
US5505607 *Jul 28, 1994Apr 9, 1996Columbia Machine, Inc.Apparatus for forming concrete products
US5505610 *Jul 28, 1994Apr 9, 1996Columbia Machine, Inc.Apparatus for forming concrete products
US5505611 *Jul 28, 1994Apr 9, 1996Columbia Machine, Inc.Apparatus for forming concrete products
US5540869 *Jul 28, 1994Jul 30, 1996Columbia Machine, Inc.Method for forming concrete products
US5544405 *Jul 28, 1994Aug 13, 1996Columbia Machine, Inc.Method for forming concrete products
US5571464 *Jul 28, 1994Nov 5, 1996Aaseth; AllenMethod for forming concrete products
US5807591 *Sep 11, 1996Sep 15, 1998Columbia Machine, Inc.Method and apparatus for forming concrete products
US6177039Sep 14, 1998Jan 23, 2001Columbia Machine, Inc.Frames and feed drawers assembly
US6352236Aug 2, 1999Mar 5, 2002Columbia Machine, Inc.Method and apparatus for forming concrete products
EP0409471A2 *Jul 11, 1990Jan 23, 1991Columbia Machine IncApparatus for forming concrete blocks
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/182, 425/432, 425/260
International ClassificationB28B1/087, B28B1/08
Cooperative ClassificationB28B1/087
European ClassificationB28B1/087