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Publication numberUS2397823 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 2, 1946
Filing dateFeb 8, 1943
Priority dateFeb 12, 1941
Publication numberUS 2397823 A, US 2397823A, US-A-2397823, US2397823 A, US2397823A
InventorsWalter Carl W
Original AssigneeWalter Carl W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Forceps
US 2397823 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 2, 1946.' I c. w. WALTER 2,397,823

FORGEPS Original Filed Feb. 12, 1941 y M W1, Wm

Patented Apr. 2, 1946 Carl W. Walter, Newton, Mass.

Original application February 12,1941, Serial No.

378,607. Divided and this application February 8, 1943, Serial No. 475,135

9 Claims.

My present invention relates to an instrument of the forceps type for general hospital and surgical use and particularly adapted for picking up, seizing and transferring from One point to another any of a wide variety of different articles the sterile condition of which must be maintained. r

In hospital practice, especially in the surgical operative field, it is essential to grasp and transfer numerous different sterile articles such as intsruments, sponges, supplies and the like. These vary widely in shape, weight and bulk as from a milliners needle to a heavy retractor or a sizable package of drygoods. The invention accordingly aims to provide a forceps of extensive or general utility, having an improved construction for the purpose and adapted and arranged for speed and convenience in use.

This application is a division of my copending application Serial No. 378,607,.filed February 12, 1941, now Patent No. 2,316,731, dated April 13, 1943. 1

In the drawing illustrating by way of example one embodiment of the invention:

Fig. 1 shows the forceps in elevation, in association with a germicicle container by whichthey are adapted to be received and supported when not in use, as in my. parent application;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical section at the lock portion of the forceps, substantiall as on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1; I

Fig. 3 is an enlarged plan of the interior face of one of the forceps jaws;

Fig. 4 is a cross-section on the line 4--4 of 3; and

- Figs. 5, 6 and '7 are further views of the forceps jaws, being respectively a side elevation, a longitudinal section and a front end view.

Referring to the drawing in more detail, the transfer instrument or forceps comprises in general a lock portion 3!, a pair of legs or shanks 32, 33 below the lock and a pair of handle members 34, 35 above it. Instead of the usual straight handle portion with terminal finger rings, I have in the illustrated example provided the forceps with a pistol-grip handle element presented by the handle members 34, 35. These are disposed at an angle preferably at least 45 to the forceps legs 32, 33, so affording a stronger and more natural grip; see particularly Fig. 1. This angular relation of grip and legs has the further advantage that when the instrument is held by a user the forceps jaws are naturally projected in the axis of the users forearm, in which position the load is easily handled, with minimum chance of Fig.

contaminating contact by misdirection of the forceps.

Desirably, lateral projections 34a, 35a are.

large hand, The handle members 34, 35 and hence also the shanks or legs 32, 33 normally stand somewhat open, as represented for example in Fig. .1, beingyieldably urged toward such position by spring means. Such means is hereillustrated as a unitary leaf spring 31 anchored at one end near the angle of one handle member, herein handle 35, and having a rounded portion 31a at its other end adapted to abut and have easy sliding contact on the inner face of the opposite handle member 34. The attached end of the spring may seat in a guide formation or recess at the inner face of the handle 35, holding it against turning relative to the latter. It is demountably or otherwise held in place, as by a screw. The spring desirably is constructed and proportioned to present the handle members substantially in the Fig. 1 position, when free of a users hand, in which position the two handle members readily conform themselves to and are enclosable-by the palm and fingers of the hand, similarly as in engaging the grip of a pistol, the

thumb and forefinger coming naturally against the prominences 34a and 35a respectively. The forceps in the entirety, including said spring 3?, preferably is formed of a chemicaL and rust-resistant material such as one of the stainless steels. I V

The outer'terminal portions or jaws 38, 39 of the forceps legs 32, 33 are speciall constructed and arranged for maximum utility of the instrument, adapting it for pickin up and grasping firmly an of the widely variant articles and materials as referred to in the introductory portion hereof. Y

Contributory to that end, the jaws are disposed at somewhat of an angle, inwardly toward each other, rather than as merestraight extensions in the longitudinal axis of their respective shank portions 32, 33. g This allows the jaws to lie sub stantially parallel to each other in a slightly open position, say approximately one-half inch apart, and alsoenables them to remain more nearly in mutual parallelism throughout their opening and closing movements.

The jaws, each of which maybe similar but oppositely disposed, and each of which is shown as a solid one-piece member, are relatively narrow and have somewhat of a longitudinal taper, ending in a rather small externally rounded tip with a fairly sharp and almost blade-like inner edge, easily thrust beneath flat articles. In Figs.

7 3 and 4 one of the jaws is shown separately, in

this casethe jaw. 38, at the end of the le 32 integral with the-handle m'ember'-34,-this' being the under jaw when the forceps is held with the users thumb on top, on said handle 34, and the forcepts legs extended horizontally. It will be understood however that the jaw portions proper" may be substantially similar, although inverted relative to each other in the assembled instrument, so that what is saidtasi'tothe jaw "38 of Figs. 3 and 4 is for the mostipart also pertinent' to jaw 49, corresponding parts being indicatedby similar reference characters; in this connection the jaws '38,.39 :ar-e concave-attheir innerfaces,

giving theman arcuate or crescenticformin cross section (Figs. 4 and t7) Theirtside :edges taper toward the opposite longitudinal crests. The two side-edge:crestsof each jaw are irregularly serrated; as at 3 8a,..38b, and are "differently and non-oppositely recessed, uponarcs of different curvatures, as-represented at 38c, 38d and 286. In this instance one pfthe jaw side edges has twosuch recesses, 38c and: 38d, the inner one 3811 standing laterally :opposite-z'nonrecessed serrated edge portions 38a, both of the same jaw and of the other jaw. [Th'e outer recess 380 is adjacent but spaced sufficiently from the tip of the jawto provide for one or more serrations 38b-between it and th'e terminal: extremity of the jaw.

Opposite this outer recess 38d of "the plurally recessed jaw edge theotheredge has the somewhat longer recess 38 'extending' substantially fully to the very-terminaltipof the jaw, there forming a sharp terminal corner or single tooth 38f. The latten'in cooperation with the pluraltoothed terminus ofthe oppositely arranged jaw,

see Figs. to '7, is adapted 'to pickup and hold firmly relatively minute articles and objects such as the smaller surgical needles, sutures, etc. In

' picking up such small articles the non -opposite single points or teeth 38f off the respective jaws serve in effect to-lift and feed them into aposition where they are grasped or clamped by the other teeth 3%; in this-connection see particularly'Fig's. 5 to '7. Y

The irregular and non-matching structure for the opposed jaws suchas here illustrated and dejaw to relatively thin, sharp wise be held in the concavity of the jaws may readily escape.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, the forceps as here illustrated has provided at its lock portion 3|, in lateral line with the pivot axis thereof, an exterior seating formation, either protuberant or reentrant, such as laterally projecting hubs, bosses or the like 36a, 36a, Fig.2. These may be variously formed. .Ashere-iIIust/rated by: way of example, they comprise extensions of the pivot element, screw, pin or the like 36 of the forceps lock portion; These formations or projections 36a, 36a are adapted for cooperation with a laterally projecting guard and supporting element 20 whereby the instrument may be held upright at the .m'outhof ajaror'oth'er container for a germicide .solution,:such :jar having a receiving rim [3 at "its upper. end, as more fully described in my copending application 7 previously mentioned. This guard and supporting element 20 also affords means whereby: the zforceps jaws .are..-heldabove and outof :contact with 1a -flat ,.surface; such asa table top, should :the instrument: belaid- :flatwise on the latter,"saidrielementjurther-servingasra scribed byway of example, together with their 7 length; special tip formation, and ability to open 7 from' a tip-contacting position at an inclination toward each oth'enthrough apo'sition of parallelism, to open positions up to angles'of and more '(thespring 31 being able to move away fromhandler 34 'in the wider" open conditions)' affords forthe forcepsan extremely wide-rangeof usefulness; importantly extendingits capacity for general utilitypick up and transfer purposes.

As seen in Figs; 3,"4 and-6, the jaw 38, the one in the lower positionwhenthe forceps is held extended,.may be formed with asdrainage aperture 389, through'which'gennicide which might otherhand guard: and barrier: for .the gripportion of the instrument. .As. here shown-the protective and supporting element 20 associated with: the forceps lock'comprises -a..=molded orzotherwise formed plate or disc of .a'rubber :or rubber-like or other resilient Y composition" at least. at nits cen', tral portion. It is:.centrallyzapertured :to .receive thelock portion 3|. of :theforceps-with the forceps legs or' shanks 32, 33 substantially :upto the "lock projecting below or beyond: the element- 211, .at the siderofrthewe-lement12D1 opposite=the grip portion, the latter extendingoppositely-above aperture conforming to the: inserted portion :of

the forceps and laterally yieldable further 'toopen or'tol'eclose the aperture :snuglyzabout: the forceps. If desired, this guard and supportingelement 20 may be removed :forcleaning or-replacement by distending it sufficiently to release the forceps pivot extensions from their receiving sockets 2|, 22, permitting "withdrawal :of :the

forceps legs. When not required theelement 2B accordingly may be omitted.

In the general use of the transferforceps in operating rooms and the like,: this instrument is kept in an upright jar containing germicide, and as to which container theelement 20 0f the orceps serves as a cover, in addi'tion toits func-.

tions'as a support and guard for the instrument,

as for example in the parent f application referred to. As in'said application; such jar or con tainer may have a -receiving rim I3;'Fig. 2,:previously mentioned-{such rim desirably having an upright flange or "lip 18 F with an; inclined outer wall. In such case the-guard and supportin ment 2 I) F of the i forceps m'ay have -a depending plug portion- 23 preferably with-a idownwardly tapered peripheral wall,":for= positioning within the receiving' aperture of the 1' ar 01' container rim it, together with a surrounding downwardly projecting peripheral flange 24 spaced from the plug portion to provide an annular channel such as 25 for snug sealing reception of the jar rim flange l8, the inner wall 26 of said peripheral flange 24 of the forceps guard and supporting element 20 then being beveled or outwardly inclined to conform to such flange l8. Thus the laterally projecting forceps element 20 is adapted for easy and assured firm seating on the container, requiring no special attention in placing it in forceps-supporting position, and in which said element serves as a closure for the jar or container and effectively prevents undue evaporation of the germicidal content.

It will be understood that my invention is not limited to the exemplary embodiment herein illustrated or described, and I set forth its scope in my following claims:

I claim:

1. A transfer forceps comprising a pair of elongated main handle and jaw members each having an intermediate lock portion, a pivot member extending through both said members at their lockportions and having its opposite ends projected laterally beyond them, and a laterally projecting flange-like guard and supporting element surrounding said main members at the lock pivot, said element being centrally apertured to receive said main members and having seating formations for the projecting ends of the lock pivot member thereby to secure said element to the main members, at least the portion of said element which immediately surrounds and defines its central aperture being adequately flexible to accommodate the opening and closing movements of the forceps main members while remaining in substantially enclosing engagement with them.

2. In a transfer forceps, a pair of pivotally associated elongated handle and jaw members, an exterior seating formation laterally disposed at the pivot axis of said members, and a centrally apertured flange-like element adapted for mounting on the forceps in laterally projecting relation at the pivot region and in general parallelism with the pivot axis, said element having means at the periphery of its aperture for interengagement with said seating formation thereby to secure said element upon the forceps.

3. In a transfer forceps, a pair of pivotally associated elongated handle and jaw members, an exterior seating formation at the pivot axis of said members, and a centrally apertured flange-like element having means at the periphery of its aperture for interengagement with said seating formation thereby to secure said element upon the forceps, at least the central apertured portion of the flange-like element being resilient and the aperturewall snugly surrounding the forceps lock portion with capacity for yielding to accommodate opening and closing movement of the forceps handle and jaw members.

4. In a transfer forceps, a pair of pivotally associated elongated handle and jaw members, an exterior seating formation at the pivot axis of said members, and a centrally apertured flangelike element having means at the periphery of its aperture for interengagement with said seating formation thereby to secure said element upon the forceps, the seating formation'at the forceps lock portion and the means on the flange-like element interengageable therewith being readily releasably associated and whereb said element is,

demountable.

5. A sterile transfer forceps particularly adapted to pick up and hold firmly articles of various shapes and sizes including articles of relatively minute cross-section such as surgical needles, such forceps comprising a pair of pivotally associated main elements each having a handle at one end and an elongated jaw at the other end, each jaw at its grasping end being recessed at its inner face and transversely rounded at its outer face to provide a crescentic cross-sectional shape at said end, the outer terminal portion of each jaw having at one inner longitudinal side edge a single tooth-like formation and at the other inner side edge a plurality of teeth, for transversely grasping by said jaws such needledimensioned articles and others.

6. A sterile transfer forceps of general utility for picking-up and transferring articles of various shapes and sizes, particularly in surgical, medical, blood-banking and such practice, such forceps comprising a pair of pivotally associated main elements each having a handle at one end and an elongated substantially straight jaw at the other end, each jaw being a solid one-piece member having at its inner face a plurality of laterally spaced longitudinally extensive series of grasping serrations, one such series adjacent each longitudinal side of each jaw, the jaws being longitudinally troughed between adjacent serration series and terminating at their outer ends in convexed and inwardly rounded tips, said jaws being manipulable as between positions of tip contact or substantially so for grasping small articles such as surgical needles and positions of wide-angle opening for grasping larger articles and objects such as sponges, surgical dressings, packages and the like for sterile transfer thereof.

'7. A sterile transfer forceps according to claim 6 wherein the longitudinal series of grasping serrations of each jaw are disposed along the longitudinal side edge portions of the inner face and are spaced laterally by an intervening longitudinal depressed portion, the serrations of at least one series of each jaw being interrupted by one or more recesses of substantial longitudinal extent, with a recess of one serrationseries standing transversely opposite a non-recessed portion of the other serration series of the same jaw,

8. A sterile transfer forceps in accordance with claim 6 wherein the jaw of the forceps which is in the lower position when the forceps is held extended is formed with a drainage aperture through which germicidal and other fluid which might otherwise be held in the jaws may readily escape.

9. A sterile transfer forceps in accordance with claim 6 wherein the handles of both main elements are disposed in general parallelism at an angle of at least about 45 to the jaws, to present a pistol-grip handle for enclosure by the palm and fingers of a user's hand with the forceps projected in the axis of the forearm,

CARL W. WALTER.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification606/207, 24/508, 606/206, 24/507, 81/426, 215/227, 294/131
International ClassificationA61B17/28
Cooperative ClassificationA61B17/2812
European ClassificationA61B17/28D