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Publication numberUS2401800 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 11, 1946
Filing dateSep 1, 1944
Priority dateSep 1, 1944
Publication numberUS 2401800 A, US 2401800A, US-A-2401800, US2401800 A, US2401800A
InventorsRyan George F
Original AssigneeUnited Shoe Machinery Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dieing out machine
US 2401800 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 11, 1946. G F, RYAN 2,401,800

DIEING OUT MACHINE Filed Sept. 1, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Q 1 g N N GGOTgFPyan Patented June 11, 1946 DIEING OUT MACHINE George F. Ryan, Peabody, Mass,

assignor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Flemington, N. J a corporation of New Jersey Application September 1, 1944, Serial No. 552,356

16 Claims. 1

This invention relates to dieing out machines, and is herein illustrated in connection with mechanism for dieing out blanks, such as shoe part blanks, from sheet material by the use of cuttin dies.

In cutting out shoe part blanks, it has been customary to employ cutting dies which are placed upon sheet material positioned upon a cutting block, and a presser member is used to deliver a blow to the die to produce a blank. In one type of machine which has come into extensive use and which is commonly known as a clicking machine, the blow is delivered to the die by means of an arm which is pivotally mounted at one side of the machine for movement over the block, the arm being swung out of the way after each dieing out operation and then moved back into position over the die in a, new location upon the material. While machines of this type are generally satisfactory, considerable effort upon the part of the operator is required in moving the arm over the block hundreds or thousands of times each day, and considerable power is required to move the beam toward and away from the block.

In view of the foregoing, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved dieing out machine so constructed as to minimize the eifort required to operate it and which at the same time is economical in its operation. To this end and as illustrated, I have provided, in a machine of the type referred to, a die supported at the end of an arm pivotally mounted for movement across and heightwise of acutting block, and mounted for movement transversely of the block, so that the die can readily be located in any desired position on the block, together with a hammer which is movable with the die laterally over the block in predetermined position above the die, and means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the die. Preferably and as shown, the die is detachably carried by a die holder, secured at the end of the arm, and there is a starting handle mounted upon the die holder for initiating power operation of the hammer. Preferably also, and as illustrated, the hammer is normally maintained in inoperative position above the die by fluid pressure means, arranged to be released upon actuation of the starting handle, there being spring means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the die. The construction and mountin of the arm are such that the weight of the die is carried by the arm, and the die can be readily moved into operative position on the block, thus requiring litle effort upon the part of the operator. The hammer for forcing the die through work may be of light construction and consequently the amount of power required to operate it is comparatively small.

These and other features of the invention are disclosed in the following specification and in the accompanying drawings, and are pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings,

Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation of a dieing out machine embodying one form of my invention;

Fig. 2 is an end view, partly in section, taken alon line II-II of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a side view, on an enlarged scale and partly in section, taken along line III-III of Fig. 2; and

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the end portion of the die holder and its supporting arm.

This machine is particularly adapted to operate upon sheet material, such as leather or fabric, to form shoe part blanks by means of cutting dies.

As illustrated in Fig. l, the machine comprises a frame I 0 carrying a cutting block l2 for supporting-sheet material M, a cutting die IS in a holder 13 at one end of an arm 20 pivotally mounted upon a movable carriage 22 in such manner that the die can be moved over the block into any desired position on the material, and a hammer 24 also mounted upon the carriage and movable with the arm 20 into such position, that, upon actuation of a manually operable starting handle 26, the hammer delivers a blow to force the die through the material to produce a blank.

The carriage 22 upon which both the die and the hammer are supported comprises a base plate 28 mounted for movement along a rail 30, extending at right angles to one side of the block on the frame l0. The base plate is supported on rollers 32 engaging spaced upwardly disposed surfaces 34 on the rail, the plate also having rollers 36 mounted with their axes inclined to the vertical on opposite sides of the rail (see Fig. 2) and engaging beveled side surfaces 38 thereof. The plate carries a vertically extending spindle 40, upon which is mounted a casting 42 rotatable about the axis of the spindle, there being a thrust bearing 44 between the casting and the upper surface of the plate for reducing friction between the two members. Positioned upon the casting 42 is a block 46, which supports a bracket composed of two upstanding plates 48 secured in spaced relation by two laterally extending blocks 50 and 52 and bolts 53.

The arm 20 is in the form of a cylindrical rod extending between the plates 48 and pivoted tothe counterweight. The other end of the rod 62 is secured to a slide 64 on the-arm'by which:

the counterweight 66 can be shifted and 11s pro-t vided with a wing nut 66 to secure the slide in fixed position. The construction.ofxthelmount ings for the carriage 22 and arm 26, just described, is such that a die .16 carried at the outer end of the arm can readily be moved into any position uponthe cutting block I'2 by swinging the arm about the axis of the spindle 46 and by moving the arm and the carriage along rail 36 in directions transversely of the block. Since the weight of'the die is counterbalanced, the die can readily be lifted above the surface of the block by rotating the arm about its pivots 54.-

The die It is a cutting die of the well-known mallet-handle type-and has a side-wall '68 telminating-in' a cutting edge 'Ii'lj'andan upwardly extending shank or handle "I2. The die 'is arranged to be detachably secured'in-the holder I8 whichcomprises a block 14 and an upstanding spindle I6: Th -head is provided with a recess 18, the side walls of which have tongues 86 arranged to-enter grooves 82 near the upper end of the shank I2 of the die; A-spring-pressedplunger 64in the blockservesto lock the die-in position in the holder; This construction facilitates the insertion in and removalfrom the holder of dies, of different shapes and sizes, each having a shank or handlesimilar to that herein illustrated.

The die holder I8 is detachably supported at the endofthe-arm 26 upon a'bracket 86 comprisinga horizontal plate88'having therein a slot 96 -'(Fi'g=- 4) terminating in a'semicircular opening 92 f a-diameter somewhat greater than that of the=spindle--I6 "of-th'e h0lder. Thewall of the plate along-theopening 92 is thickened and is adapted 'to engag -theholder above and below a groove-94= near-the upper end of the holder to locate the holder in predetermined position horizontally. A-slide'96 m0untedin grooves 68 in the plate fifi has a semicircular end wall I66 adapted to enterthe groove 64 001001: the holder in fixed-position heightwise of the plate, the slide normally beingheld inlocking position against the spindle by a-spring I02 mounted on a pin I64 securedto the-slide and extending loosely'through a closure plate I116. The spindle projects above the plate 88 111 position to receive upon its upper end blows delivered by the hammer 24 to force the die IBthrough the work.

In order to secure the bracket 86 to the arm 20, the bracket is provided with a downturned flange I68 (Figs. 1 and 4), which bears against a plate H0 on the outer end of the arm and is secured to the-plate by bolts II2 extending through the flange and plate, there being springs II4 on the bolts for forcing-the two parts together. The plate I II] has a tongue-I I6 positioned in a vertical groove I I8 in the flange 168 for maintaining the bracket and arm in alinement. This constructionprovides a yieldableconnection between the dieholder- I8 and its supporting-arm 2Il, such arm by means of a rod 62 having one end secured surrounding the spindle I6 of the 4 that the holder can rock slightly in a vertical plane so that the die I6 can move in a direction normal to the cutting block I2 during a cutting operation without likelihood of breaking the parts.

The starting handle 26 is in the form of a sleeve die holder immediately below the plateBB, andihas a key I26 positioned in a vertical keyway I22'in the spindle, thus securing the handle and spindle together for movement about the axis of the spindle in shifting :the position of the die [6 angularly, while at the same time permitting movement of the handle along thespindle upwardly into engagement with the plate 68 preparatory to raising the die above the block, or downwardly to initiate a dieing-out operation, as hereinafter described. The lower. end ,of the handle is provided with a flared skirt I24, which acts as a finger guard.

. The hammer 24 is carried by a rod I26 extending betweenthe plates 48 and pivoted thereto by means'of pins I28 arranged to engage a collar I30 fixedly secured to the rod I26. The weight of the hammer is partially balanced by a counterweight 32 on the end of the rod I26. The hammer is generally cylindrical in shape, but has an attenuated' striking portion I34 for engaging the upper end of the spindle I6. The pivots for the arm 26 and the rod I26 are positioned one above the other, so'tnat the arm and rod are movable in the same vertical plane, irrespective of their angular positions about the axis of the spindle 46. The lengths of the arm and the rod and the spacing of the pivot pins 54 and I28 with relation to the height of the die I6 and die holder I8-'are such that, when the die is down uponthe work, the arm 26 is horizontal with=the spindle 16 Vertical, and when the hammer is'brought downupon thespindle '16 the rod I26 will be in a horizontal position; as shown in dotted lines-in Fig. 1, with the axis of the hammer vertical. This ensures that the hammer blow will be substantially normalto the; cutting block which is desirable to produce perfect blanks.

In order to eliminate any'likelihood of an operator getting his fingers caught between the hammer and spindle, there is provided a guard I 36, preferably composed of a sheet of transparent material I38 extending alongthree sides of the plate 88,'and projecting upwardly by a distance somewhat greater than the length of the hammer. The material I38 is supported by a metal frame comprising-upper and lower U- shaped strips I40 and vertical members I42, and is secured to the plate-by screws I44.

The hammer 24 is normally held in raised position, as shown in full lines in Fig. 1, by pneumatic means. To ,thisend, the counterweight I 7 Won the inner end of the rod I26 is connected bya link I46, Fig. 3, to the upperend of a piston rod I48 connected to' a piston I56 sliclably mounted in a cylinder I52 supported 'on a'plate I54 forming a lateral extension-of the casting 42. The upper end of the cylinder is closedby a head I56 secured in position by bolts I58 extending upwardly from the plate I54. Located in the head on opposite sides of the piston rod, are two fluid passages, one'of which is shown at I60, which are connected, respectively, to two fluid conduits I62 and I64 extending between the head and a cylindrical valve chamber !66 located in the block 46'. A fluid supply pipe I68 i connectedto the valve chamber at a point opposite the entrance of the conduit I62 to the chamber, and oppositethe conduit I64 is an ex-- haust port I leading from the chamber to the open air. Within the chamber is a bushing I12 having near one end oppositely disposed elongated openings I14 alined with the supply pipe I68 and with the conduit I62, and having at the other end similar openings I16 aligned with the conduit I64 and with the exhaust port I10. Within the bushing is fitted a cylindrical valve I11 having an elongated radial passage I18, for connecting the passages I14, and a similar passage I80 for connecting passages I16. The passages I 18 and I80 are displaced relatively to each other through an angle of about twenty degrees, so that when one of them is positioned in alinement with passages in the bushing, the other is closed off by the wall of the bushing. Thus, with the valve and other parts in the positions shown in Figs. 2 and 3, fluid, preferably air under pressure, passes from the supply pipe I68 through passage I18 and to the conduit I62 into the upper portion of the cylinder. The passage I80 is closed, and consequently pressure in the cylinder builds up forcing the piston down, thereby raising the hammer and maintaining it in raised position. When the valve is rotated about twenty degrees into position with the passage I60 in alinement with the passages I16, the fluid supply through its valve passage I18 is shut off and the air in the cylinder is partially exhausted through the conduit I64, valve passage I80 and the port I10, thus releasing the piston and hammer.

The valve I 11 is arranged to be operated to release the hammer upon depressing the starting handle 46. To this end, there is provided a pawl I82 pivoted at I84 on a bracket I66 carried by the block 46. The lower end of the pawl enters a notch I88 in a stud I90 secured to the valve. By shifting the position of the pawl, the valve can be moved to either of its extreme positions. The pawl is operated by a slide I92 having a notch I94 arranged to receive a nose portion I96 at the upper end of the pawl. The slide is arranged for reciprocation by means of a rod I98 supported by brackets 208 depending.

from the arm 20. The outer end of the rod I98 is connected through a series of links 202, 204, 206 supported by brackets 208 to one arm 2H! of a bell crank lever 2I2, the other arm 2I4 of which engage the under side of the starting handle 26. The rod is normally urged to the left, Fig. 1, by a spring 2I6 pressing against a collar 2I8 on the rod to force the collar to engage the innermost of the two brackets 206, thus to maintain the slide I90 in a position in which it can engage the pawl I68 upon rotation of the arm 20 about its pivots in a clockwise direction, Fig. 1. The spring 2'I6 normally operates to force the arm 2I4 in a direction to maintain the starting handle 26 at the upper portion of the spindle 16 in contact with the under side of the plate 88.

The mechanism for efiecting a power operation of the hammer comprises two stiff springs 220, the lower ends of which are secured to spring perches 222 carried by the block 46, the upper ends of the springs being connected to a pivot 224 carried by a block 226 arranged to engage the upper surface of the rod I 26. The block is in the form of a casting having two downwardly extending spaced plates 228, between which are mounted rollers 230 adapted slidably to engage the rod I26. The block 226 is pivotally mounted upon two vertically extending rods 2'32 slidable vertically in the blocks 50 and 52, which serve to guide the slide in a vertical movement while at the same time permitting the slide to move about its pivot 224, so that the rollers are maintained in engagement with the rod I26. When the valve I11 is operated to effect release of air under pressure from the cylinder I52, the springs 220 are immediately efiective to force the slide 226 rapidly in a downward direction effecting r0- tation of the hammer 20 about its pivots, caus ing it to deliver a, blow to the upper end of the die holder thus to drive the die through the sheet material on the cutting block.

In order to render the hammer inoperative when, for example, it is desired to make adjustments in the machine, there is provided a safety latch comprising a detent 234 pivotally mounted upon the block 50 and arranged to be moved about a horizontal axis by a handle 236. The detent can be moved into a position in the path of the downward movement of the rod I26, and serves to prevent movement of the hammer into engagement with the die holder.

In the operation of the machine sheet; material I4, to be cut into blanks, is positioned upon the cutting block I2. The operator grasps the start ing handle 26, raising it to lift the die I6 above the Work, moves the handle over the block to locate the die in operative position for cutting a blank, and then depresses the handle to initiate operation of the hammer 24 in forcing the die through the material. During movement oi the handle in positioning the die on the work, by reason of the construction of the mountings for the die holder I8 and the hammer 24, the hammer is maintained in fixed alinement relatively to the die holder, and is held in elevated position above the holder by fluid under pressure supplied to the upper side of the piston I59 in the cylinder I52. Upon depression of the handle 26 the valve I11 is operated to shut sit the fluid supply and to relieve the pressure in the cylinder through the exhaust port I10, whereupon the springs 220 force the hammer down upon the die holder. When the handle is released, the spring 2I6 operates the valve IT! to shut off the exhaust port and to open the fluid supply line to the cylinder, thus to effect downward movement of the piston resulting in the raising of the hammer into its original position above the holder. w

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A dieing-out machine comprising a frame, a cutting block mounted in the frame, a bracket carried by the frame and mounted for movement about a vertical axis, an arm carried by the bracket and pivotally mounted thereon for movement about a horizontal axis, a die carried at an end of the arm for movement across the cutting block, a hammer pivotally mounted upon the bracket for movement toward and away from the die, means normally operative to maintain the hammer in raised position above the die, and means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the die.

2. A dieing-out machine comprising a frame, a cutting block carried by the frame, a die movable over the cutting block, means for sup porting the die comprising an arm, means mounting the arm for movement about horizontal and vertical axes and for linear movement transversely of the cutting block, a hammer, means for mounting the hammer for movement across the surface of the cutting block in predetermined 7 relation tothe die, and means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the die.

3. A dieing-out machine comprising a'frame, a cutting block carried by the frame, a carriage mounted for movement laterally of the cutting block, a bracket mounted upon the carriage for movement about a vertical axis, an arm pivotally mounted upon the bracket for movement about a horizontal axis, a die supported at one end of the arm for movement over, the cutting block, a hammer pivotally mounted upon the bracket for movement heightwise of the cutting block, and means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the die.

4. A dieing-out machine comprising a frame, a cutting block, a carriage mounted at one side of the cutting block for movement toward and away from the block, a bracket mounted upon the carriage for movement about a vertical axis, an arm pivotally mounted upon the bracket for movement about a horizontal axis, a die carried at one end of the arm for movement over the cutting block, a hammer pivotally mounted upon the bracket for movement about a horizontal axis, a fluid chamber mounted on the carriage, a piston mounted in the chamber, a link connecting the piston with the inner end of the hammer, means for supplying fluid under pressure to the chamber for normally maintaining the hammer in inoperative position above the'die, manually operable means for releasing the fluid from the chamber, and spring-operated means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the die.

5. A dieing-out machine comprising a frame, a cutting block carried by the frame, a die holder. a die carried by the holder, means for mounting the die holder for movements heightwise and transversely of the block in positioning a die upon work to be operated upon, a hammer, means for mounting the hammer for correlated movements with the die, means for normally maint aining the hammer in inoperative position above the die, manually operable means for releasing the last-mentioned means to render the hammer operative, and means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the die.

6. In a machine of the character described, a frame, a cutting block carried by the frame, a carriage movable transversely of the cutting block, an arm pivotally mounted upon the carriage for movement about horizontal and vertical. axes, a die carried at the outer end of the arm for movement over the cutting block, a hammer pivotally mounted upon the carriage for movement with the arm about a vertical axis, means mounting the hammer for movement about a horizontal axis toward and away from the die, fluid pressure-operated means normally effective to maintain the hammer in raised position above the die, spring-operated means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the die, and manually operated means associated with the die for initiating an operation of the spring-operated means.

7. A dieing-out machine comprising a frame, a cutting block mounted upon the frame, a carriage mounted upon the frame for movement laterally of the cutting block, an arm pivotally mounted upon the carriag for movement over the cutting block, a die carried at an end of the arm and movable with the arm over the cutting block and heightwise thereof, a hammer, means mounting the hammer upon the carriage for movement angularly over the cutting block in predetermined relation to the die, and means for moving the hammer heightwise of the cutting block in delivering a blow to the die to force it through material positioned upon the block.

8. A diein out machine comprising a frame, a cutting block carried by the frame, an arm pivotally mounted for movement angularly over the cutting block and for movement heightwise thereof, a die, means for yieldably supporting the die upon an end of the arm, a hammer, means mounting the hammer for movement angularly over the cutting block with the arm, and means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the die.

9. In a dieing out machine, a cuttingblock, an arm pivotally mounted upon the frame of the machine at on side of the cutting block, a die holder comprising a head and an upstanding spindle, means for securing the spindle to the end of the arm, a hammer, means mounting the hammer for movement with the arm angularly over the block, a die mounted in the head, and means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the end of'the spindle'to forcethe die through material positioned upon the block.

10, A dieing out machine comprising a frame, a cutting block mounted upon the frame, an arm pivotally mounted upon the frame for movements angularly over and heightwise of the cutting block, a di carried by an end of "the arm, a seccnd arm mounted upon the frame for movement with the first-mentioned arm angularly over the block, a, hammer carried by the second-mentioned arm, means normally operative for holding the hammer in raised position above the die, means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to'the die, and a guard carried at the end of the firstinentioned arm and surrounding the area of contact between the hammer and the die.

11. A dieing out machine comprisinga frame, a cutting block carried by the'frame, a die holder having a head and an upstanding spindle, a, die carried by the head, an arm pivotally mounted upon the frame of the machine, means for securing the die holder to an end of the arm, a hammer mounted for movement toward and away from the spindle for delivering blows to the spindle to force the die through Work positioned upon the block, power-operated means for effecting movements of the hammer, and a manually operable starting handle mounted on the spindle for initiating actuation of the power-operated means.

12. A dieing out machine comprising a frame, a cutting block mounted upon the frame, a carriage slidably mounted on the frame for movement toward and away from the cutting block, a bracket pivotally mounted upon the carriage, an arm pivotally mounted upon the bracket for angular movement about a horizontal axis, a die carried at the outer end of the arm, a second arm pivotally mounted upon the bracket for movement about a horizontal axis, a hammer carried by the second-mentioned arm and movable with the arm in the plane of the first-mentioned arm, spring-operated means for forcing the hammer toward the die, fluid pressure-operated means normally effective to maintain the hammer in raised position over the die, and manually operable starting means for rendering the fluid pressure means inoperative thereby'causing th hammer to deliver a blow to the die.

13. A dieing out machine comprising, a frame, a cutting block mounted upon the frame, a cutting die, means for supporting the die comprising an arm pivotally mounted upon the frame for movement angularly over'and heightwise of the block, a hammer mounted upon the frame for movement angularly over the block with the die, means normally operative to maintain the hammer in spaced relation above the die, manually operable means associated with the die for releasing the last-mentioned means, and means for effecting an operation of the hammer upon th die to force the same through material positioned upon the block.

14. A dieing out machine comprising a frame, a cuttin block mounted upon the frame, a carriage mounted upon the frame at one side of the cutting block, an arm pivotally mounted upon the carriage for movement about horizontal and vertical axes, a die carried by an end of th arm in juxtaposition to the cuttin block, a counterweight upon the other end of the arm, a hammer, means mounting the hammer for movement angularly over the block in predetermined relation to the die, fluid pressure means normally operative to maintain the hammer in inoperative position above the die, means for causing the hammer to deliver a blow to the die upon release of the fluid pressure means, and manually operable means associated With the die for releasing th fluid pressure means.

15. A dieing out machine comprising a frame, a cutting block mounted in the frame, an arm pivotally mounted upon the frame for movement angularly across the block and heightwise thereof, a cuttin die carried at one end of the arm, means for securing the die to the arm comprising a die holder having an upstanding spindle, a bracket mounted upon the end of the arm and having an opening for receiving the upper end of the spindle, and spring pressed means carried by the bracket for engaging the spindle to lock it in fixed position heightwise of the bracket.

16. A dieing out machine comprising a frame, a cutting block mounted upon the frame, a bracket mounted upon the frame at one side of the block for movement about a vertical axis, two arms pivotally mounted upon the bracket for movement in the same vertical plane about horizontal axes, a die carried by one of the arms and a hammer by the other of the arms, a pressure chamber carried by the bracket, a piston mounted in the pressure chamber, means connecting the piston with an end of the arm associated with the hammer, means for supplying fluid under pressure to the pressure chamber thereby to cause the piston to move the hammer away from the die, a starting handle associated with the die, means operable by the starting handle to release fluid pressure in the chamber thereby to release the hammer for an operation upon the die.

GEORGE F. RYAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2508574 *Dec 28, 1945May 23, 1950United Shoe Machinery CorpEdge-guided point marker for insoles
US2602507 *Mar 1, 1946Jul 8, 1952Nichols Adams IdaTool press and operating means therefor
US2740472 *Feb 1, 1952Apr 3, 1956Burdett Philip HShearing machine
US3045521 *Jul 9, 1958Jul 24, 1962Bernard C EisenbergReleasable tool for clicker die press
US4373413 *Dec 10, 1980Feb 15, 1983Ernst Mohrbach KgPunch press apparatus for placement and alignment of a knife holder
US4379418 *Feb 3, 1981Apr 12, 1983Martin Robert PSafety boot for punch or the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification83/532, 83/601, 83/544
International ClassificationA43D8/04, A43D8/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43D8/04
European ClassificationA43D8/04