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Publication numberUS2402306 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 18, 1946
Filing dateOct 7, 1943
Priority dateOct 7, 1943
Publication numberUS 2402306 A, US 2402306A, US-A-2402306, US2402306 A, US2402306A
InventorsTurkel Henry
Original AssigneeTurkel Henry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Retaining guard guide for needles
US 2402306 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 18, 1946. I H TURKEL 2,

I RETAINIEG GUARD GUIDE FOR NEEDLES Filed 001:. '7, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN V EN TOR. bf/Y/PX Tamra fowdm H. TURKEL 2,402,306

RETAINING GUARD GUIDE FOR NEEDLES Filed Oct. 7, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 $45 M as June 1 8, 1

I INVENTOR.

- f/E/Y/PX TUE/(EA flTTOlP/VEX Patented June 18, 1946 ;--2, i02,sef- 1 "RETAINING GUARD GUIDE FO'B' NEEDLES i lenry' T urkeLDetx-oit, Mich.

This invention relatestofa retaining guard guide for needles and particularly' for needles employed in performing'biopsi'es; ilfij' ections, or transfusions, irrigations'; implantations, etc.- 7

'It" isthe object o'fth'e present invention to prcvi'de-aguide means forthe Darticularneedle employed for governing the direction of move-" ment and insertion of theneedle within the tissue at the desired point; I i

It is'the object of this invention to provide a retaining andguide means for the needle to gether with means forp'ositively locating the point of entryofthe needle; and for maintaining said guide means against movement from said point; g

It is the furtherjob je'ctherein to provide'means for-guidingly inserting th nedleemployed at a predetermined angle" as desired, "together with means'for regulating;'saidangularity.

It is the still further 'obj'ectofth'is invention] to" provide with "saidneedle guide, guard means for fixedly se'curingth'e needle within its support after the insertion. whereby the needle cannotice withdrawn, or inserted deeper than initiaL lyset,'wit'hout further adjustment of said. guard means. g

It is the furthen'o'bject of this invention to provide supporting"nieans sufiiciently flexible or pliableto" conform tothe' curvature or sh'ape'of I 30 the memberor organ of'the body to. which it is I to be attached, for performing the function of a needleretaining guard guide. j f. g

It is the further "object of this. invention to provide an angularly pivotal needle guide] and support withca'lib'rations for indicating the degree ofangularity desired. j i p It is thefurther object herein to provide. needle' guide and retaining means'together with manually operable means for progressively inserting or removing said nee'dle from the tissue.

It is the. further'obj'ect of this invention. to provide a supporting means adapted to be mounted upon the body of a patient, an angular needle guide means thereon, with a needle opening thereth'rough arranged at an acute angle to said support, and aneedle adjustably positioned through said opening with its endf'liavin'g abevelled portion with the angle thereof substantially equaltosaidacuteanglei i It is the further object hereintoprovide pivotal needle guide and retaining. meanstogether with manually" operable means for progressively insert.- ing and removing the needleifrom. the tissue.

Amman-til October 7, 194 Serial No. 505,407

. 1 Claim. (01. 1281-215).

accompanying specification, claim and drawings of which- Y Fig. 1 is aside elevational view uard guide.

Fig. 2 is a top plan View thereof. Fig. 3 is a fragmentary side elevation of the of the retaining I needle and guide-in operative position.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary side eievational view of the guard guide with angle adjusting means.

Fig. 5 is a front elevational view of the same.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the guard guide with calibrated angle indicating means thereon. I

Fig. '7 is an elevational sectional view of. the needle guardguide with manually operable inserting'means. i

Fig. 8 is an elevational section of an angularly adjustable guard guide with manually operable needle inserting means.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary partially sectioned elevational view of a calibrated pivoted guide with manually operable needle inserting means.

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary elevational section of the guard guide with a slightly different type of I manually operable needle adjusting means.

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary sectioned elevational' view of an angularlyarranged needle guardguide with a different type of manually operablenee dle inserting means.

Fig; 12 is a further view of the modification of Figure 8' showing the needle in position prior to insertion in theguide member;

The above drawings illustrate preferable embodiments of th invention, by way of illustration, it being understood that other embodiments are contemplated within the scope of the inventionhereafter set out.

In the drawings, thesupporting member H is substantially flat at its central portion but with the oppositely disposed extending leaf members I2adapted for angular bending to coincide with the shape of the body member to which the retaining guard guide is to be'secured, as shown in Fig.3.

oppositely arranged retaining members l3 also projecting. from and forminga part of said supporting member I I, provide securing means therefora's best shown in Figs. 2' and 3. Tape It or other-suitable material transversely disposed over the top surface of members l3 and secured to the body member illustrated fragmentarily at l 5 in Fig. 3, is. adapted tosmaintain the needlesupport I -I firmly inthe position. desired. a

The needle guide member I8 centrally secured- These and otheriobiectsiiwill. b seen. in the; to suppgrt l-J' hasian; angnlarly disposed guide'slbfi or opening I1 provisioned therethrough within which the needle 19 is guidingly inserted'for a sliding fit. Said opening is preferably arranged at approximately a forty-five degree angle as shown in Fig. 1; however it is contemplated that the guide member itself be adapted for angular adjustment as shown inFlgs. 4, 5 and 6. l

The biopsy needle I9 shown herein by way of illustration is provisioned through opening I1 in guide 16, and also through a corresponding aligned opening l8 in support I I.

As shown in Figures 1, 3, 8 and 11, the outer pointed end of needle 19 is bevel pointed at an acute angle substantially equal to the angle guide opening I1 makes with support 12, upon which guide I6 is mounted.

It will be noted further that with the needle properly positioned, the bottom or bevelled edge of said needle lies in a plane substantially parallel to the flat portion of support 12.

As a safety feature in the insertion of thencedle, as for instance in making infusions in the marrow portion of the bone in sternal infusions, by arranging the needle guide at an acute angle the bevel of the needle tip isnearly parallel to the inner surface of the posterior lamella, which makes it practically impossible for the needle tip to be pushed through the "posterior lamella and into the anterior mediastinum.

One of the difliculties of intramedullary infusions has been the penetration of the needle into the tissues through the posterior boney wail of the lamella, by the use of uncontrollable force.

Where the ordinary needle with the right angular guide is employed, there is insufficient control over the needle and the degree and extent of its penetration. To eliminate this danger, inventors angularly arranged guide is employed making it practically impossible to efiectan excessive or dangerous penetration.

It is, therefore, important that the bevel angle at the cutting end of the needle be substantially equal to the angle of insertion of the needle into the patient; and further that said bevelled end lie in a plane substantially parallel to the corresponding outer surface of the body at the point of insertion.

Oppositely arranged slots 28 provisioned in members l2, as in Fig. 2, provide an alternate means of attachment through which gauze-or other securing means may be disposed.

The guard means provided herein consists of a manually operable threaded stud 20 threadably journaled through guide It transversely to the opening 11 and the needle shaft I9 therein. The end of stud 20 is adapted to frictionally'engage needle I9 for locking the same in any desired position within guide I6.

Thus it is seen that means are provided preventing relative movement of the needle I9 either in or out of guide l6. Consequently with the needle once properly inserted to the desired depth within the tissue a positive guarantee is effected that the needle will not accidentallyor' otherwise be displaced or moved relative to the support or to the tissue it engages. V

Furthermore stud 20 is adapted to tightly hold the needle IS in place during the desired operation, be it a biopsy, an injection or transfusion, or

otherwise. 7

Indicating means 2| and 22 notched within members l2 and I3 respectively point to and coincide with the center point of opening I8 within support ll. Thus means are provided for ac- 4 curately positioning opening 18 over the exact part or point on the body at which the biopsy or other operation is to take place.

In Figs. 4 and 5 the needle guide 23 for slidably supporting needle [9 is pivoted within the bifurcated stirrup 24 mounted and secured upon base member II. A trunnion supp rt is provided for guide 23 consisting of the co-axial oppositely arranged bolts 25, the inner ends of which are secured within said guide for pivotal angular movement therewith relative to stirrup 24.

Suitable manually operable lock nuts 28 are I threaded upon bolts v25 for frictionally engaging the outer surfaces of member 24, whereby guide .23 may be locked in any desired adjusted position, as shown in Fig. 4.

Similarly a locking stud 20 is threaded transversely. within guide 23 for frictional engagement with needle [9 slidably disposed therethrough. Base l as in Fig. 4 is slotted at 21, corresponding to opening l8 shown in Fig. 1, for receiving the needle [9 in any desired acute angular position. It is understood that with guide means 23 being angularly adjustable it is necessary that opening 21 be slotted permitting such transverse movement.

Fig. 6 is similar to Fig. 4 except that the biiurcated supporting member 24 is provided with -angle calibrations 29, as 15, 45 and degrees.

so that a given angularity of needle 19 may be determined. Needle guide 30 pivotally supported at 3| within support 24 is adapted to tilting movement as desired. v a

In Fig. 7, showing a slightly difierent embodiment, the needle guide guard consists of a support 32 with an upwardly extended hollow needle guide 33 exteriorly threadedat 34. Needle l3 slidably provisioned through opening 35, has an annular flange member 36, thereon adapted to be retained within the manually adjustable member 31, which is interiorly threaded at 38 for cooperative threaded engagement with the needle guide 33. Needle flange '36 is further retained at its under surface by pins 39 transversely disposed through member 31.

Consequently rotary movement of member 31 will cause translation of needle I9 within needle guide 33 and-support 32;

IS in any desired'adjusted position.

In Fig. 8, showing a slightly different embodi ment, th needle guide guard consists of asupport 4| with an upwardly extending hollow needle guide 40 disposed atan acute an le and 8a., teriorly threaded at 34. Needle l9 slidably positioned through opening 35, has an annular flange" Consequently rotary movement of member 31 willcause translation of needle I!) within needle guide '40 and support 4|. It is noted that flange 36 provides effectivemeans for retaining 19 many desired adjusted position. I

It will also be noted that the bevel angle at the end of needle I9 is substantially equal to the angle guide opening 35 makes with guide sup port 4|. And furthermore, it is seen-that the'bev-f elled end of said'needlejliesin a plane substang 'tially parallel to the plane of support 4 I It is noted that flange 36 provide eifectiv'e'means for retaining needle n edl Fig. 9 is similar to Fig. 7 with the exception that the needle guide 42 is pivotally supported at 43 within the bifurcated support 44. Needle l9 disposed through pivotal guide 42 and slot 45 in support 46, is similarly provided with an annular flange as shown in Fig. 7. Said flange is also retained within the manually operable adjusting member 31 by means of the transverse pins 38 provisioned thereunder.

As in Fig. 7, guide 42 is exteriorly threaded for cooperative threaded engagement with the interior threads within adjusting member 31. Consequently, regardless of the angular position of ide 42, needle l9 may be longitudinally adjusted therein by means pf rotatable member 31.

In Fig. 10 the guide guard consists of a. support 32 and upwardly extending hollow needle receiving guide 33 as in Fig. 7. Needle l9 provisioned through said guide and support is adjustably retained therein by means of the threads 47 forming a part of needle I 9.

The manually adjustable member 48 interiorly threaded for cooperative threaded engagement with needle threads 41, is slidably supported by means of its inwardly extending annular flange 49 rotatably received within a complementary annular recess 50 within guide 33.

Thus on rotational movement of member 48. needle l9 may be adjusted longitudinally within its guide 33, it being understood that needle I9 is itself retained against rotational movement, either manually, or by frictional engagement with the tissue.

In Fig. 11, the guide guard consists of a support 52 and outwardly extending hollow needle receiving guide 5| disposed at an acute angle. Needle 19 positioned through said guide and support is adjustably retained therein by means of the threads 41 forming a part of needle IS.

The manually adjustable member 48 interiorly threaded for cooperative threaded engagement with needle threads 41, is slidably supported by means of its inwardly extending annular flange 49 rotatably received within a complimentary an nular recess 50 within guide 5|. Thus on rotational movement of member 48, needle l9 may be adjusted longitudinally within its guide 5|, it being understood that needle I9 is itself retained against rotational movement either manually, or by frictional engagement with the tissue.

It will also be noted that the bevel angle at the end of the needle I9 is substantially equal to the angle the guide opening in guide 5| makes with support 52; furthermore, it is seen that the bevelled end of said needle lies in a plane substantially parallel to the plane of support 52.

Having described my invention, reference should now be had to the claim which follows for determining the scope thereof.

I claim:

A needle retaining guide guard comprising sup porting means, guide means thereon with an opening therethrough arranged at an acute angle to said supporting means, a needle positioned through said guide means and having a bevelled end with its bevel angle substantially equal to said acute angle, annularly flanged means on said needle, and rotative operative means engaging and retaining said flanged means and threadably engaging said guide means for effecting longitudinal adjustments of said needle relative to said guide means.

' HENRY TURKEL.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/174, 600/573, 451/382, 128/DIG.260
International ClassificationA61M25/02, A61M5/32
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2025/0266, A61M2025/028, A61M5/32, A61M25/02, Y10S128/26
European ClassificationA61M25/02, A61M5/32