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Publication numberUS2402982 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1946
Filing dateFeb 14, 1944
Priority dateFeb 14, 1944
Publication numberUS 2402982 A, US 2402982A, US-A-2402982, US2402982 A, US2402982A
InventorsSteenbergen Charles
Original AssigneeChesebrough Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bandage package
US 2402982 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 2, 1946- c. STEENBERGEN BANDAGE PACKAG E Fi1ed Feb. 14, 1944 Patented July 2, 1946 i BANDAGE memos Application February 14, 1944, Serial No. 522,309

9 Claims. 3

This invention is concerned with a package of surgical dressing comprising gauze or like material in which the dressing is provided within an enclosing wrapper and with the inclusion of means for preparing the same for easy and convenient withdrawal as an incident of the opening of the wrapper.

The invention is particularly valuable for employment under conditions where the dressing comprises a carrier fabric, such as gauze, impregnated with an unctuous,.-pasty, semi-liquid or jelly-like substance such as petroleum jelly, a fatty ointment, or a viscous aqueous emulsion, either with or without medicaments: such impregnants or saturants will be herein termed adherent liquids because they remain adherent to the carrier when the latter is Withdrawn for use.

In the illustrative form of practicing the invention, the dressing package is substantially flat and flexible and comprises the folded gauze or carrier fabric within a tightly sealed wrapper or envelope of flexible, tearable material, where with the dressing itself is protected against penetration of contamination such as infective mat ter: and with the advantage, in the event of employment of petroleum jelly or like fluid saturants, of preventing seepage or leakage of such saturants. The disclosing means is effective for bringing an end of the gauze or fabric into a position, incidental to the opening of the envelope or wrapper, in which this gauze or fabric may be easily seized for withdrawal.

With these and other features in view, as will appear in the course of the following description and claims, the selected illustrative form is set forth on the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view. indicating the folding of the dressing fabric and the positioning of the disclosing strip therein.

Figures 2 and 2a are perspective views indicating the folding and partial sealing of a wrapper around the pile of folded fabric to provide an open-ended envelope.

Figure 3 is a perspective view conventionally illustrating the introduction of molten petrolatum into the envelope for saturating the pile of fabric located therein. 1

Figure 4 is an elevation of the face of the completed package.

Figure 5 is a conventionalized cross-section through the same, on a larger scale, substantially on line 5-5 of Figure 4.

Figure 6 is a perspective view showing the package. after opening a margin thereof.

(Cl. zoo-63.2)

In the drawing, a strip of fabric such as surgical absorbent gauze, muslin, calico, percale, or the like, and composed of staple or filamentary yarns of cellulosic, protelnaceous or synthetic 5 fibers, is folded in zigzag or plaited fashion, so that it can be pulled out to a straight line by tension along its length. In the illustrated form, the zigzag is providedby alternation of long and short folds to provide a pile ill of superposed 10 layers as shown in Figure 1, having a substantially trapezoidal cross-section (Figures 2 and 5) aseach successive doubled edge extends farther toward the left than a corresponding doubled edge above it. The upper and right handfree i5 edge in Figure 1 is shown as folded back to provide a fold l i in which is inserted a withdrawing thread 82. The left hand or lower free edge i3 projects beyond the doubled edge immediately above it, to complete thestep-wise arrangement of the left hand edges, as illustrated.

This folding is described and claimed in the Peal and Emery application Serial No.-52l,690, filed February 9, 1944. I

The withdrawing thread may be formed fro a staple yarn, a filament yarn, a monoiilament, or a strip of material; and formed of cotton, linen, silk, synthetic silk, regenerated cellulose, metal or like material which is resistantt o the conditions of normal employment, and resistant to the saturating substance if such be used, and has the tensile strength requisite for effecting withdrawal or unfolding.

This pile it is then enclosed and tightly sealed in a protective envelope.

In the illustrative form of practice, the envelope is formed around the pile by placing the pile it upon a sheet of flexible, tearable, grease-proof, foil-like material such as regenerated cellulose, varnished paper, metallic foil, etc., capable of pre- 40 venting entry of contamination to the pile, which material'is then folded substantially at the lines l6 indicated 'by dash lines and in the manner shown by the arrows, to provide a flattened tubu- ,lar structure, with the panel l'l lying closely upon the pile ill but not extending over the entire area of the fabric near the free edge i3. The panel i8 at the opposite margin of the sheet is then folded on top of the panel I? and secured thereto throughout their lengths. As shown, the free edge I 3 of the fabric strip is rebent and received between the panels il, IE, but is not fixed there;

to. One end of the tube. including the panel i9. is likewise sealed so that the lips are closed; and this seal engages and holds the corresponding end of the disclosing thread, but preferably this thread aeoaasa does not extend to the end of the tube. This sealed end may then be folded over, for example, about-the folding line 18a, and is likewise secured in this position; thus providing a refolded end.

The package, thus far prepared, has the pile ill within the open-ended envelope as shown in Figure 2a. It will be noted that one end of the disclosing thread if projects beyond the pile l and is received between the panels H and is, and is detained in such position by the adhesive which is employed for closing and sealing the envelope at such end thereof; but preferably does not extend to the margin of the original sheet (see Figure 2).

The assembly of the pile l9, with its open-ended envelope, is then subjected to a sterilizing operation, for example, by hot steam in an autoclave.

The envelope thus prepared is represented by E in Figure 3, and is then positioned with its open end upward and molten petroleum jelly is introduced as by a funnel 25, using a predetermined quantity of this petroleum jelly corresponding, for example, to 250 to 400 percent of the weight of the fabric. It is preferred in practice to accomplish this operation in a chamber for maintaining sterility of the partly formed package E and of the petroleum jelly.

The funnel 2B is withdrawn and the lips at the open end of the envelope are brought together and sealed, whereby a packa e is obtained as shown in Figure 4, in which this seal is indicated by the dotted cross-hatching 28. The pile iii of folded fabric, now saturated with petroleum jelly, is shown by dash lines, and the edge of the rebent fold I l is shown by dash and-dot lines. The d sclosing thread I! is shown by dotted lines, and it will be noted that, as in Figure 4, the right hand end of this disclosing thread is preferably caught within the refolded portion of the envelope at the panel 58, while the left hand end extends into the cemented area 26 but does not extend to the outside of the package, whereby wicking is prevented but the ends of this thread are securelyflxed to the wrapper or envelope. It is preferred to provide a nick or notch 27 for initiating the tearing operation in the opening, this notch bein formed at the margins of the sealed lips at a point sion, or which provide a nutrient substrate for organisms. Thus dissolved, hot-fluid or hot-tacky organic bodies such as cellulose ethers and esters. phenolic and other resins, and the like may be used; and these have been found effective even when petroleum Jelly is used as a saturant, as they form tight seals against leakage thereof. When metal foil is used, it may also be secured by welding or soldering.

Further, the invention includes, the employment of an envelope of flexible sheet material which becomes cohesive upon heating, so that the envelope may be formed and sealed by heating and pressing portions of the material together. Suitable substances of this class are organic plastics of high molecular weight which formfiexible sheets and become thermoplastic, pressure-sensitive and self-adherent upon heating to a temperature of, say, 250 degrees F., and have satisfactory strength and resistance characteristics, such as vinyl, acryiate and halo-acrylate resins, and the hydrocarbon-resistant synthetic elastomers of butadiene condensation. High molecular weight vinyl resins may be formed into flexible sheets, and used for envelopes to contain petroleum jelly or other greases. With such materials, the parts to be joined are heated to the pressure-sensitive condition, and then pressed together and allowed to cool.

In employing the package, the thin, protective, tcarable and flexible material of the envelope can be torn by starting at the notch 21 and pullin the material so that it begins to rip in the general direction designated by the dash-dotted line 27a extending from the notch 27 in Figure 4. The

tearing of the envelope is continued until the entire edge has been torn away, being the bottom end in Figure 4. This tearing, is illustrated as relatively inward from the position of the disclosing thread l2, and having its end within the area 28 of the sealed lips of the package.

The securing of parts of the envelope together may be accomplished in various ways. Thus, the entire surface of the wrapper sheet may be originally supplied with a heat-sealing coating, and

the securing of panels l1, IE to form the tube, the

scaling at the panel I! and the securing of the refolding end, as well as the final closing of the open end, may all be accomplished by appropriate heating means for temporarily softening the coating to a tacky adhesive condition while exerting pressure upon the contacting parts. It will be noted that when the refolding of the panel I 9 is omitted, the wrapper material need only be coated at the inner side. Further, it is included within this invention to employ a' wrapper material which does not become adhesive upon heating and to accomplish the securing of the parts by application of an adhesive :material directly to the sheet as an incident to the shaping and assembly. Suitable adhesives are those of types presently employed in securing to ether sheets of regenerated cellulose, metallic foil, etc., and

, should be selected as providing a; flexible joint,

withexclusicn of substances which may weaken under atmospheric conditions or water-immcr occurring through both sides of the envelope, being essentially along the straight line 27a; and the notch 21 prepares the envelope for such rupture essentially parallel to the doubled folds and remote from the step-wise offset doubled folds at the left in Figure 5, so that tension may be exerted along the partly-withdrawn strip as de scribed hereafter, while employing the envelope to prevent contact with parts of the carrier which have not yet been withdrawn.

. As the disclosing thread I2 is fixed to the material of the portion of the envelope which is thus torn away, it acts somewhat like a bow string to a draw or extravert the rebent fold ii and pull it out of the package, from the position shown in full lines in Figure 5 into the position shown by dotted lines in this figure. and thus into the position' indicated in Figure 6.

This removal of the edge of the envelope therefore permits the user to seize the extraverted fold it with sterile forceps F and pull the fabric, with its saturation of the petroleum jelly therein and thereon, out of the residue of the envelope E.

It will be understood that the thickness and separation of the materials of the carrier strip and envelope of the preferred package have been exaggerated in the drawing for clearness of description; and that in the preferred practice the materials may be very thin so that a flat package is produced. Thus, the employment of flexible wrapping material. for the envelope permits the latter to-conform closely to the carrier strip in its folded condition.

By reason of the arrangement of the successive zigzag folds or double layers, the operator can press upon the flexible wrapper with his finger, as illustrated in Figures 5 and 6, thereb exerting sufficient detaining pressure upon the folds so that the fabric is detained while the envelop margin is being torn away, and then the fabric can be drawn out successively and the desired endwise tension can be exerted for assuring that the strip is fully extended as it is applied: and it will be noted that the strip can be drawn forth by one or more double layers at a time and the tensioned length thus obtained is engaged with the patient's arm, for example, and the residue of the package passed around the arm successively as further folds are withdrawn, thus avoiding possible contact of the sticky strip with extemal objects during the course of application.

By slipping the upper finger (Figures and 6) successively toward the left, the double folds are successively released so that they may be drawn out and expanded.

It will be noted that if the other free end l3 be engaged between the panels l1, Hi, this Will permit a. further tension to be exerted upon the bandage when all of the rebent folds have been withdrawn from the envelope, and this free edge l3 will be released when the pressure by the finger is removed and the extreme edge 30 of the envelope employed for pulling the residue of the envelope E from the end l3 of the bandage.

' In the-illustrative form, for example, the compact, fiat package may contain about 30 inches of absorbent gauze of a width of 3 inches and formed with successive folds which are offset about 5 of an inch, so 'that the folds have an average width of about 1 /8 inch. The wrapper (Figure 2) was provided by a rectangular sheet of regenerated cellulose having a' thickness of about 0.001 inch and an area of 4 by 4% inches. When in the position shown in Figure 3. the pile of folded dressing fabric was located to extend upwardly from the lower end of the envelope-and to leave an unoccupied open end about inch deep. The disclosing thread employed for this illustrative practice was about 3% inches long. thus being less than the corresponding dimension of the wrapper sheet it. The material used for.

the wrapper sheet has been found to be easily tearable preparatory to use of the bandage strip: but, due to its flexibility. it is substantially free of accidental damage by which the petroleum jelly may leak out or by which any infective matter may gain access into the envelope.

In preparing this package, an essentially sterilized gauze was employed of the type known in the United States'Pharmacopoeia, Twelfth Revision, as Type I, .absorbent gauze, of cotton staple and having 44 warp threads per inch of width and either 36 or 40 filling threads per linear inch, as the interstices between threads of such a gauze have been found excellently adapted for remaining substantially filled with petrolatum upon withdrawal from the package.

In thi illustrative form of practice, the -band-. age was saturated or impregnated with a semiliquid or jelly-like material, specifically petroleum jelly or petrolatum described in the United States Pharmacopoeia, Twelfth Revision, having a speciflic gravity between 0.815 and 0.865 at 60 degrees C., with a standardized melting point es-' sentially between 100 and 140 degrees F.- This petrolatum remains shift at 30 degrees F. and below, sothat it i ready for immediate use under all normal conditions of application to the'flesh:

and has essentially the characteristics of a soft,

plastic mass of microcrystalline structures em-' on and in the individual fold of the fabric so that the operation of separating these folds from their superposed zigzag position brings the strip I into an extended condition having a substantially continuous saturation and coating of petrolatum thereon.

It is preferred to establish the pile of folded fabric and then to provide the same with a wrapper, and to sterilize the semi-assembled package in this condition, as this permits the employment of relatively high steam temperatures without difficulty, and assures a definitely sterile condition. Onthe other hand, the procedure of manufacture of petroleum jelly, in separating it from other petroleum components or fractions, together with subsequent refining operations, effects a thorough sterilization thereof, and any infection is normally a result of condition subsequent to the preparation. Such minor possibilitie of subsequent infection may be circumvented by substantial treatment of the finished petrolatum with steam under pressure and then maintaining it in a closed system until actually filled into the package.

By bringing the sterile petroleum jelly into the sterilized, partly-assembled package under sterile conditions. and then closing and sealing the lips of the package under sterile conditions, the bandage is thus itself freed from contamination of bacterial nature and does not require further. sterilization prior to use..

It will be understood that the illustrative forms of practice are explanatory and are not limiting, and that the invention may be employed in many ways within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by ternal contamination with a margin of the envelope lying adjacent to said fabric bight, and'a thread located within said bight with its ends extending beyond the lateral edges of the folded strip and secured to the envelope next to its margin whereby, upon tearing the margin of said envelope and compressing the envelope upon the said second portion, the thread may be pulled and caused to draw out the said first portion of the strip to bring the said end of the strip into a position beyond the torn lip of the envelope while leaving the said second portion within the package. I

2. A surgical bandage package, comprising a plaited strip of fabric, an end'portion thereof having an edge folded to form a bight, the strip having a second portion extending inwardly from the said first portion, a tearable protective envelopeenclosing and tightly sealing the strip against external contamination with a margin of the envelope lying adjacent to said fabric bight, said envelope having sealing portions adjacent the lateral edges of the folded strip. and a thread 10- catedin 'said bight with its ends extending beyond the lateral edges of the folded strip and engaged within sealing portions of said envelope. whereby upon compressing the envelope upon the said second portion and tearing off part of a sealing portion and the margin of said envelope, the thread is pulled and caused to draw out the said r 7 first portion of the strip to bring the said end of the strip into a position beyond the torn lip of the envelope while leaving the said second portion within the package.

3. A surgical bandage package, comprising a plaited strip of fabric, an end portion of the fabric thereof having an edge folded to form a bight, the strip having a second portion extending inwardly from the said first portion, a tearable protective envelope enclosing and tightly sealing the strip against external contamination, said envelope having opposite faces of substantially rectangular form with sealing portions adjacent the lateral edges of the folded strip, and a thread located in said bight and extending beyond the lateral edges of the folded strip and secured at its ends in the sealing portions thereof adjacent the corners of said face which are located adjacent said bight, whereby in the operation of tearing off a portion including said corners from said envelope, the thread is held by the torn-off portion and caused to pullout the said first portion to bring the said end of the strip into a position beyond the torn lip of the envelope while leaving the said second portion within the package.

4. A surgical bandage package, comprising a plaited strip of fabric, an end portion thereof having an edge folded to form a bight, the strip having a second portion extending inwardly from the said first portion, a protective envelope of tearable material enclosing and tightly sealing the fabric, with a margin lying adjacent to said fabric bight and a thread located in said fabric bight and having its ends extended beyond the edges of said strip and fixedly connected to said envelope adjacent the proximate corners thereof, whereby upon tearing said envelope parallel to said margin to separate a marginal portion including said corners, the thread is pulled and caused to draw out the said first portion of the strip to bring the said end of the strip intda position beyond the torn lip of the envelope while leaving the said second portion within the package.

5. A surgical bandage package, comprising a plaited strip of fabric, an end portion thereof pile of fabric against external contamination thereto, said envelope having corners adjacent the ends of said bight, and a thread loosely located in said bight, the wrapper being notched for tearing detachment of a portion thereof in-' eluding said corners as an incident of preparing bring the said end of the strip into a position beyond the torn lip of the envelope while leaving the said second portion within the package.

'7. A surgical bandage package, comprising a strip of fabric plaited to form a pile, an end portion thereof having an edge folded to form a blg'ht, the strip having a second portion extendhaving an edge folded to form a bight, the strip having a second portion extending inwardly from the said first portion, a flexible envelope of tearable material enclosing and tightly sealing the fabric, said envelope having corners adjacent the ends of said bight, and a thread located in said bight with its ends extended beyond the edges of said strip and fixedly connected to the material of the envelope adjacent a margin thereof which i between said corners and ad- ,iacent and parallel to said bight, said envelope having a notch formed at its end at a point spaced from said margin and with the'adjacent end of the strip secured between said notch and said a bight, the strip having a second portion extending inwardly from the said first portion, a tearable wrapper enclosing and tightly sealing the portion thereof having an edge folded to form ing inwardly from the said first portion, an adherent liquid material saturating said fabric, and

an envelope of flexible material enclosing and t tightly sealing the folded pile of fabric and said liquid material against external contamination, the seals of said envelope including opposite end portions formed of contacting areas joined togather and extending along the lateral edges of the strip, a thread located in said bight and having its ends projecting from the pile and fixedly connected to the material of the envelope ad- Jacent the margin thereof which extends from one envelope end portion to the other and is located adjacent said bight, said envelope material and its seals being impervious to said liquid material, said ends of the thread terminating and being fastened within the said Joined contacting areas whereby loss of the liquid material along said thread is prevented, whereby upon tearing the envelope along a line extending parallel to said margin, the separation of the torn portion including said margin and at least one of said thread connection will cause the thread to pull out the said fabric end portion to bring the said .end of the strip into a position beyond the torn lip of the envelope while leaving the said second 1 portion within the package.

8. A surgical bandage package, comprised of a strip of fabric plaited to form a pile, an end por-- tion thereof having an edge folded to form a bight, the strip having a second portion extending inwardly from the said first portion, petroleum jelly saturating said fabric, and an envelope of flexible grease-proof material enclosing and tightly sealing the folded pile of fabric and the jelly against external contamination, the seals of said envelope including opposite end portions formed of contacting areas-joined together and extending along the lateral edges of the strip, a thread located in said bight and having its ends projecting from the pile and fixedly connected to the material of the envelope adiacentthe margin thereof which extends from one envelope end portion to the other and is located adjacent said bight, said envelope having a notch formed at and terminating in one end portion at a point spaced from said margin inwardly of said thread end so that the end of the thread is located between said notch and said margin,- said ends of the thread terrninating within the said joined contacting areas whereby loss of the greasy material along said thread is prevented; whereby upon tearing the en velope along a line extending from said notch parallel to said margin, the separation of the torn portion including said margin and at least one of said thread connections will cause the thread to pull out the said end portion to bring the end 0! the strip into a position beyond the I 10 bight, and a thread in said bight and having its ends secured to portions of the protective envelope whereby upon tearing away said portions of the envelope and forming an opening therebe- 5 ,tween the thread is caused to effect unfolding and projection of said one end of the folded strip.

CHARLES STEENBERGEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2555564 *Jun 23, 1949Jun 5, 1951Berman Oscar AExpandible adhesive material
US2574710 *Jan 9, 1948Nov 13, 1951William C RodgersCleansing tissue package and method of packaging
US2584336 *Dec 13, 1949Feb 5, 1952Gordon Jerome JContainer and draw cord combination
US2888133 *Dec 3, 1956May 26, 1959Betteridge Harry WDisposable shoe dressing device
US2947415 *Oct 3, 1957Aug 2, 1960Bard Inc C RSterile package and method of making same
US2956723 *Nov 10, 1958Oct 18, 1960Kendall & CoLaminates
US2965225 *Apr 9, 1957Dec 20, 1960Ethicon IncSuture package
US3018881 *Jun 2, 1960Jan 30, 1962Minnesota Mining & MfgAdhesive bandage package unit
US3084793 *Jul 27, 1959Apr 9, 1963Crown Zellerbach CorpSterile package and method
US3112031 *May 3, 1960Nov 26, 1963George H StewartSterile package
US3343534 *Jul 25, 1966Sep 26, 1967Johnson & JohnsonSurgical drape
US3359569 *Apr 12, 1966Dec 26, 1967Johnson & JohnsonSurgical gown
US3395063 *Apr 4, 1963Jul 30, 1968Pires And Mourato VermelhoProcess for the preparation of sterile dressings
US4749080 *Oct 16, 1987Jun 7, 1988Toohey Richard DPackaged reusable moist cloth and method
US5328053 *Mar 22, 1993Jul 12, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyPackages for single-use folded towels which provide for unfolding of the towel upon removal from the package
US5361936 *Mar 18, 1994Nov 8, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyPackages for single-use folded towels which provide for unfolding of the towel upon removal from the package
US5363986 *Mar 18, 1994Nov 15, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyPackages for single-use folded towels which provide for unfolding of the towel upon removal from the package
US5656282 *Jan 5, 1995Aug 12, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyPackage for containing and applying a bug repellent patch
US5753246 *Dec 2, 1996May 19, 1998Peters; Marlin W.Chlorhexidine in alcohol, aloe vera, cocoa butter
US6149614 *Jul 2, 1997Nov 21, 2000Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMedical adhesive composite and package
US6162454 *Aug 7, 1996Dec 19, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanySubstrate impregnated with volatile liquid insect repellent such as citronellol, dimethyl phthalate, thyme oil red and other specifics; porous cover layer comprising a film having three-dimensional tapered apertures covering the substrate
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/440, 383/206, 602/41, 206/210
International ClassificationA61F13/15, A61F13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2013/00897, A61F13/551, A61F2013/008, A61F13/00072
European ClassificationA61F13/00