Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2404531 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 23, 1946
Filing dateDec 13, 1943
Priority dateDec 13, 1943
Publication numberUS 2404531 A, US 2404531A, US-A-2404531, US2404531 A, US2404531A
InventorsRobertson Archibald
Original AssigneeAdel Prec Products Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Conduit supporting block
US 2404531 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 23, 1946. A. ROBERTSON 294(34531 CONDUIT SUlfPORTING BLOCK Filed Deo. 13, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet l ARCH/5,4m /PaERTsoN July 23, 41946. A. ROBERTSON 2,404,531

CONDUIT SUPPORTING BLOCK Fil'ed Dec. 13, 1.943 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 23, 1946 CONDUIT SUPPORTING BLOCK Archibald Robertson, North Hollywood, Calif., assignor to Adel Precision Products Corp., a corporation of California Application December 13, 1943, Serial No. 514,137

(Crais-6s) 3 Claims. 1

This invention relates to a sectional block-like support for holding in place in aircraft a group of conduit lines, with said lines clamped on cushioned seats to dampen vibrations and protect the lines against wear, this type of support being exemplified in United States Letters Patent No. 2,227,528 issued to Paul W. Adler on January 7, 1941.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a sectional conduit supporting block of the character described in which the sections are made of plastic, wood, metal or other rigid and relatively stillE material and provided with flanges to facilitate the mounting thereon of yieldable cushion strips of rubber, synthetic rubber or the like, thereby making it possible to use but a small amount of the strategic cushioning material as compared to the thick block-like cushions heretofore used and at the same time insuring a more secure holding of the cushion strips on the rigid sections of the block.

A further object of my invention is to provide a conduit-supporting block of the character described which will permit of the advantageous use therein of extruded cushion strips which are substantially C-shaped in cross section, this type of strip having become a standard product in the art for use on conduit clips of the type shown in United States Letters Patent No. 2,215,283 for Line supporting clip, issued to Paul W, Adler on .A

September 17, 1940, thereby making one form of cushion strip suited to blocks of the type here shown as well as to said clips.

Another object of my invention is to provide an improved body construction for conduit supporting blocks of the character described wherein the sections of the body are each made of like half sections of sheet metal stampings or molded sections of plastic material to facilitate and reduce the cost of the manufacture of the blocks and preform the cushion retaining flanges thereon.

A further object of my invention is to provide a conduit-supporting block of the character described in which each section has an I-shaped cross section to reduce weight and provide flanges Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a conduit-supporting block embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken on the line `2--2 of Figl; l

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig, 4 is a fragmentary perspective view of one of the sections of the block with the cushion removed therefrom;

Fig, 5 is`a perspective View of a modified form of this invention;

Fig. 6 is a cross sectional view taken through Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary longitudinal section taken on the line I--l of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. '7;

Fig, 9 is a fragmentary exploded perspective view of one of the two-part sections of the block as shown in Figsl 5 to 8 inclusive, showing how the two parts are vfitted together to make a section of the block.

As shown in the accompanying drawings a conduit-'supporting block embodying my invention is lmade up of a pair of opposed elongated and rigid body sections I and 2 having complementary conduitreceiving channels 3 in opposed faces thereof which latter as well as the channels are lined by cushion strips 4 of yieldable elastic material such as rubber or synthetic rubber so that the conduits 5 will be embraced by and clamped between said strips when said sections are clamped together by bolts 6 and nuts 1. The bolts are passed through openings 8 in said sections and also provide for securing the block as a whole with the conduits clamped therein to a structural part of the aircraft, such as the part' 9 here shown.

The present invention deals more particularly with the construction of the body sections I and 2 and the particular association thereof of the cushion strips d. Each block section is of an I- shape in cross section and made of a rigid plastic material or wood or metal. This formation provides desired strength with a relatively thin section of light weightvwhich may be readily and inexpensively stamped, cast or molded. It also provides flanges I0 projecting laterally from opposite longitudinal edges of the web portion I I of each section. The flanges I0 on the opposed surfaces of the sections I and 2 as shown in Figl 4, follow the curvature of and project laterally from the channels 3, thus forming portions of the walls of the channels.

The cushion strips 4 are substantially C-shaped in cross section and comprise a main body strip 4a adapted to lie upon the fiat surfaces between the channels 3 and also line said channels from one end of the block to the other; side flanges Ib extending at right angles to the body strip to lie against the outer edges of the flanges IIJ, and flap-like flanges 4c projecting inwardly from the flanges 4b and parallel to the strip @a so as to'lie against the inner surfaces of the flanges Iii with their longitudinal edges against the webs II.

It is now seen that the cushions may be slipped endwise onto the flanges I throughout the length of the sections I and 2 and will be securely held thereon by means of the flanges 4b and fac. With this arrangement the cushion strips form a cushion between the body sections I and 2 also embrace the conduits so as to effectively dampen lvibration in the conduits and prevent wear thereof. This method of afxing the cushion makes it unnecessary to cement or ,otherwise fasten the cushion .strips and makes it possible to readily replace a worn or damaged cushion in the eld. j

If desired the edge or face of the section which is opposed to the structural part 9 of the aircraft may be fitted with a cushion I2 of the same construction as the cushion 4 as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 so as to cushion the block against said structural part. In this connection it is noted that the flanges I0 on the outer edges or faces of the sections I and 2 are straight and that the cushion strip I2 may be fitted thereon in the same manner as the cushions 4 are fitted on the flanges at the opposed surfaces of the body sections.

It is now seen that in having the block body made of half-sections having the flanges I0 along opposite sides of its longitudinal edges as here provided, the sections may be made with relatively thin webs and ianges of non-strategic material such as wood 0r plastic or of thin sheet metal, yet will have requisite strength and rigidity and provide for a most convenient use of flanged cushion strips which are securely held in place by the flanges on the sections. Moreover the flanged construction makes it possi-ble to mount the rubber cushion strips on the outer edges as Well as the inner or opposedv edges of the body sections as.

the occasion demands. Furthermore, the flanges on the inner or opposed faces of the block sections provide for relatively long cushioned seats axially of the conduits and complementary channels 3 as said flanges form portions of the walls of the channels which provide in effect a series of sleeve-like conduit-embracing seats securely holding the conduits in place.

In Figs. 5 to '7 inclusive I have shown a modified form of the invention which embodies all of the features of the rst described form and is of the same construction except that the sections I 4 and I5 forming the body of the block are each made of two channel shaped parts that may be cast, stamped or molded. More particularly this form of my invention lends itself to being conveniently and inexpensively made of sheet metal stamped in the formation best shown in Fig. 9.

In this form the two channeled parts making I4 up each body section are designated I6 and are spot welded together as at I'I to form a complete I-shaped half section of the block.

As all other parts of this modified form are of the same construction as those shown in Figs. 1 to l inclusive, they are identified by the same reference numbers plus a prime character, for example, the cushion strips are il', the bolts 6', nuts l', flanges Ill', and so on.

This modified form is employed in the same manner as the first described forni and its stamped out formation of two channeled parts for each half section. of the body of the block and the I-beam shape of the sections makes for requisite strength with a low weight and but a small amount of body material. The half circular rib-groove formations I8 which form the bolt holes afford effective reinforcement along with the flanges per each half of each body section.

While I have shown and described specific embodiments of my invention I do not limit myself tothe exact details of construction set forth, and the invention embraces such changes, modifica tions and equivalents of the parts and their formation and arrangement as come within the puru A View of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a conduit supporting block, opposed block sections having complementary conduit-receiving channels extending transversely of opposed faces thereof, laterally extending flanges on said sec-- tions, cushions of yieldable material mounted on said flanges and lining said opposed faces and Said channels; and means for securing said sections together to clamp the conduits therebetween.

2. In a conduit supporting block, a pair of opposed body sections having complementary conduit-receiving channels extending transversely of opposed faces of said sections, each of said sections being of I-shape in cross section and defining flanges projecting laterally outward from opposite sides thereof, certain of said flanges following the contour and forming portions of the walls of said channels, cushion strips embracing the side edges and opposite faces of said certain flanges and lining said channels, and means for securing said body sections together to clamp the conduits therebetween.

3. In a conduit supporting block, a pair of op posed body sections having complementary conduit-receiving channels extending transversely of opposed faces, of said sections, each ol said sections being of I-shape in .cross section and defining flanges projecting laterally outward from opposite sides thereof, certain of said flanges following the contour and forming portions of the Walls of said channels, cushion strips embracing the side edges and opposite faces of said certain anges and lining said channels, and means for securing said body sections together to clamp the conduits therebetween, said cushion strips having flanges thereon and being of an approximate C-shape in cross section and subject to being moved endwise onto said flanges and sections.

ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2570447 *Apr 2, 1945Oct 9, 1951Garland M GeorgeHardware for mounting an overhead garage door
US2889011 *Sep 29, 1955Jun 2, 1959Weaver Wesley AAntenna guy wire vibration damper
US2901204 *Jan 11, 1957Aug 25, 1959Louis Davis FrankLitter brackets
US2936982 *Apr 9, 1956May 17, 1960Thomas AssociatesCushioned conduit clamp
US3083939 *Mar 2, 1961Apr 2, 1963Gallagher Jr Edward JFloating shockproof and vibrationless assembly for delicate instrument panel mount
US3225506 *May 11, 1961Dec 28, 1965Bertil Aberg AndersFastener and distance means for tubes and conductors
US3270471 *Oct 10, 1961Sep 6, 1966Prescon CorpPost-tensioning apparatus for prestressing concrete
US3397431 *May 12, 1967Aug 20, 1968Hydro Craft IncTube clamp assembly
US3458163 *Mar 27, 1967Jul 29, 1969Egerton Smith Eng LtdCleats
US3521051 *Dec 18, 1967Jul 21, 1970Wullschleger EugenInstallation device,especially for mounting rising or ascending conduits or the like
US4388519 *Feb 1, 1982Jun 14, 1983General Electric CompanyNoise isolation means for convoluted sheathed electric heater
US4550451 *Oct 7, 1983Nov 5, 1985Hubbard George RUniversal plumbing pipe locator and support
US4769876 *Feb 26, 1987Sep 13, 1988Platt Richard BFor automobile ignition wires
US4799641 *Feb 9, 1988Jan 24, 1989Koreski Martin JAnchor device for holding hoses against retracting slidable movement
US5060810 *May 3, 1990Oct 29, 1991Gary JonesClamps for load braces
US5261633 *Dec 17, 1992Nov 16, 1993Mastro Ronald JPipe support system
US5377939 *Mar 10, 1993Jan 3, 1995Deutsche Aerospace Airbus GmbhDevice for mounting elongated components, such as electrical wiring, especially in an aircraft
US5738147 *Oct 5, 1995Apr 14, 1998Ipex Inc.Modular, conduit-engaging end-frame
US5941483 *Apr 24, 1998Aug 24, 1999Volvo Trucks North America, Inc.For mounting a service line to a support structure
US5971663 *Jul 10, 1997Oct 26, 1999Brothers; Jerry T.Culvert collar
US5992802 *May 14, 1997Nov 30, 1999Campbell Design SystemsCable support
US6053456 *Jun 29, 1998Apr 25, 2000Lucent Technologies Inc.Cable anchor assembly
US6152406 *Jun 9, 1998Nov 28, 2000Emhart Inc.Pipe fastener and method of manufacture
US6161589 *Jul 30, 1999Dec 19, 2000Bolotte; RussellPipe hole covering and sealing trim
US6182837 *Jan 12, 2000Feb 6, 2001CargomaxMethod and apparatus for secure storage and handling of elongate objects
US6234277 *May 7, 1999May 22, 2001Draka Elevator Products, Inc.Cable sway reduction device
US6308921 *Jun 5, 2000Oct 30, 2001Hydac Befestigungstechnik GmbhTwo-pipe clamp
US6799607Jun 18, 2003Oct 5, 2004Pbm, Inc.Sanitary conduit support systems and methods
US6799926 *Jan 24, 2000Oct 5, 2004Ralph Barclay RossCargo handling apparatus
US6926237 *May 29, 2003Aug 9, 2005Illinois Tool Works Inc.Vibration damping clip
US7011277 *Mar 29, 2004Mar 14, 2006Newfrey LlcAntivibration clamp for elongated objects
US7195038Sep 1, 2004Mar 27, 2007Pbm, Inc.Conduit supports
US7316390 *Oct 20, 2005Jan 8, 2008Aaron BurlisonConduit clamping device
US7367363Dec 19, 2005May 6, 2008Pbm, Inc.Sanitary conduit support systems
US7481247Dec 19, 2005Jan 27, 2009Stauff CorporationSanitary conduit supports
US7530536 *Jul 4, 2005May 12, 2009Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaClamp
US7543606Dec 19, 2005Jun 9, 2009Stauff CorporationMethods for supporting conduits in a sanitary environment
US7770848 *Nov 29, 2007Aug 10, 2010The Boeing CompanyClamp for securing an object to a structure
US7926765Jan 15, 2008Apr 19, 2011Securus, Inc.Pipe locator and support
US8226051Apr 15, 2011Jul 24, 2012Securus, Inc.Pipe locator and support
US8231160 *Apr 19, 2007Jul 31, 2012Mcenaney EdwardRack for carrying a hose
US8267357 *Feb 18, 2011Sep 18, 2012Kawasaki Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaWaterproof cable guide device for railway vehicle
US8348204 *Feb 18, 2011Jan 8, 2013Kawasaki Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaCable guide unit water-proof device for railway vehicle
US8464985 *Jul 27, 2009Jun 18, 2013Steven D. MulchAttachment device for elongated member
US8590955Feb 27, 2012Nov 26, 2013Edward McEnaneyRack for carrying a hose
US8596589Jun 9, 2009Dec 3, 2013Syntiro Dynamics LlcAttachable grommets for hanging pipes
US8616506 *May 14, 2008Dec 31, 2013Roxtec AbCable lead-through device
US8662456 *Jan 17, 2012Mar 4, 2014Tsubakimoto Chain Co.Cable protection and guide device
US8746632Oct 22, 2008Jun 10, 2014J. Van Walraven Holding B.V.Riser clamp with vibration isolation
US20100090073 *Jul 27, 2009Apr 15, 2010Mulch Steven DAttachment device for elongated member
US20100187371 *May 14, 2008Jul 29, 2010Stefan MiltonCable lead-through device
US20100258686 *Mar 31, 2010Oct 14, 2010Airbus Operations LimitedCable raceway
US20110204202 *Aug 25, 2010Aug 25, 2011Aims International, Inc.Systems and methods for supporting tubular members
US20110253846 *Feb 18, 2011Oct 20, 2011Kawasaki Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaCable guide unit water-proof device for railway vehicle
US20110253847 *Feb 18, 2011Oct 20, 2011Kawasaki Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaCable guide unit water-proof device for railway vehicle
US20120097468 *Oct 11, 2011Apr 26, 2012Kobelco Construction Machinery Co., Ltd.Construction machine
US20120205498 *Jan 17, 2012Aug 16, 2012Tsubakimoto Chain Co.Cable protection and guide device
US20120212881 *Feb 17, 2012Aug 23, 2012Schneider Electric Sachsenwerk GmbhElectrical switchgear, in particular medium voltage switchgear
DE29614016U1 *Aug 13, 1996Oct 24, 1996Formzeug Formen Und WerkzeuggeMehrfach-Kabelhalter
DE102005011131A1 *Mar 10, 2005Sep 14, 2006Airbus Deutschland GmbhHolder for guiding and fixing of element e.g. cable, has two holding components with recesses in which damping device is provided such that element is surrounded by damping device in assembled condition of first and second holder component
DE102005011131B4 *Mar 10, 2005Jul 26, 2007Airbus Deutschland GmbhHalterungssystem zur Führung und Befestigung eines oder mehrerer Rohre oder ähnlich geformter Körper
EP2158653A1 *May 14, 2008Mar 3, 2010Roxtec AbCable lead-through device
WO1983002655A1 *Jan 24, 1983Aug 4, 1983Goeran SundholmPipe clamp
WO1989001107A1 *Aug 3, 1987Feb 9, 1989Goeran SundholmA pipe clip
WO2001053736A1 *Dec 19, 2000Jul 26, 2001Nachi Robotic Systems IncClamp assembly for a robotic system
WO2009022960A1May 14, 2008Feb 19, 2009Roxtec AbCable lead-through device
WO2010047578A1 *Oct 22, 2008Apr 29, 2010J. Van Walraven Holding B. V.Riser clamp with vibration isolation
WO2012065446A1 *Jun 24, 2011May 24, 2012Zte CorporationFixing cable clamp
WO2014040777A1 *Jul 17, 2013Mar 20, 2014Robert Bosch GmbhHolder for fastening a tubular component to an add-on structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/68.1, 138/106, 174/40.0CC
International ClassificationF16L3/223
Cooperative ClassificationF16L3/2235, F16L55/035
European ClassificationF16L55/035, F16L3/223B