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Publication numberUS2406801 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1946
Filing dateMar 1, 1943
Priority dateAug 2, 1940
Publication numberUS 2406801 A, US 2406801A, US-A-2406801, US2406801 A, US2406801A
InventorsWilliam B Byers
Original AssigneeWilliam B Byers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making insulating blankets
US 2406801 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. Sept. 3, 1946.

w B. 'BYERs METHOD 0F MAKING INSULATING BLAH-IETS Original Filed Aug. 2, 1940 2 Sl'lees-Sheet l INVENTOR MYI/bm .5. B yer; v

ON wha Sept. 3, 1946. w, B, BYERS y 2,406,801

' METHOD oF MAKING INSULATING BLANKETS orjlginal Filed Aug. 2, 1940 2 sheets-sheet 2 INVENTOR Wi/liamB. Byers ATTORNEY Yvide a method of making Patented Sept. 3, 1946 METHOD OF MAKING INSULATING BLANKETS William B. Byers, Kansas City, Mo. Original application August 2, 1940, Serial No.

No. 2,342,839, dated February 29, 1944. Divided and this application March 1, 1943, Serial No. 477,609

r1 claims. (ci. 154-28) 350,023, now Patent My invention relates to the method of making insulating blankets, and is a' division of my application Serial No. 350,023,1iled August 2, 1940, now Patent No. 2,342,839,` dated Feb. 29, 1944, on insulating blanket and methody of making the same.

It is a purpose of. my invention to provide a method of making a composite insulating blanket comprising loose insulating iibers with covering sheets oi paper for holding the iibers in position, in which the bers are absolutely loose, that is, not secured to each other in any manner, but merely held in position in'pockets, the bers in each pocket being entirely unattached to each other.

It is a further purpose of myinvention to proan insulating blanket of the above mentioned character, which is provided with means for preventing the shifting of the loose fibers out of position between the cover sheets, and particularly to provide an improved vmethod of makingV such a blanket rapidly arid cheaply.

It is a further purpose of my invention to provide a-method of making an insulating blanket of the above mentioned character that is of a flexible character, so that long lengths thereof can be rolled up for transportation purposes and cut to proper length on the job for installation.

It is a particular purpose of my invention to provide a method that avoids the difficulties in manufacture that exist in certain types of insulating blankets, in which a mat of loose fibers is made by spraying an adhesive on the fibers as the same are laid into the mat, and drying the damp mat before covering it with enclosing sheets of paper, and further to provide a method that avoids stitching the sheets together, thus avoiding the making of holes that resultvfrom the stitching.

It is a further purpose of my invention to pro- Vide a method oi making an insulating blanket that is vapor proof, and that is so made that the cover sheets cannot separate further apart than is intended, and a vmethod in which the liber can be placed-in the blanket `iorrn than has heretofore ticularly one in which such loose ,luiy material is made up of a short fiber'insulation, such as wood fiber, or Wood cotton.

It is still a further purpose of my inventiony to provide a method of making an insulating in a lighter o-r uftier Y been possible, and par- Y blanket that is provided with Va series of overlapping pockets, or chambers, in which the loose iiber insulating material is enclosed, the pockets Va loose parcel o 2 being formed around the ing material placed in process of manufacture thereof.

It is afurther'purpose ofv my invention to provide a new and improved method oi making an bodies of loose insulatinsulating blanket ofthe above mentioned charv acter, which is l inexpensive and simple-compared with previously known vmethods of making such blankets, due to the fact that the wood fiben or other ber, used therein doesnot have to be dried after itr is formed into a ma Alsodue to the methodA used, vmuch simpler apparatus -can be used for carrying out the method and the completed article canL beproducedmuch more rapidly. This is accomplished by providing three layers, or plies, of paper, or similar material, two of which are on the outer sides of the blanket when completed, and the third oiwhich is 10- cated between the othertwo plies, or layers, with batts oli iibrous insulating material laid between these.

My method more specifically comprises placing parcels of said brous insulating material, of predetermined size and area, transversely on a, ply of paper-like covering material in spaced-relation to each other longitudinally of the ply, and similarly placing such parcels on an intermediate layer, or ply, of paper-like material, that is corrugated, or similarly pre-formed, tol give the same flexibility in length,v after said intermediate ply is placed in position, over the outer ply that has had the pre-formed parcels of insulating material deposited on the upper side thereof, the parcels being placed so that the spaced preformed parcels Vof iibrous material on the corrugated, or intermediate ply, will be located in staggered relation to the parcels of fibrous insulating material. on the outer ply, under the same, then placing another outer ply over the exposed parcels of fibrous insulating material that are positioned on rtheintermediate-ply and securing all these plies to eachv other, so as to hold the same in predetermined relative position to each other. Y

It is a further purpose of my/invention to lay of saidv brous material on said plies, of a substantially predetermined shape, or area, and press this into shape inv the pockets that are formed between the plies after the parcels of insulating material and plies are assembled in predetermined relationship to 'each other, the spacing of these pre-formed parcels of insulating material being such that these over lap lengthwiseof the insulating blanket after the plies are secured together.

the blanket during,Y the` Vvide a, method covering plies that It is a further purpose of my invention to provide a method of making an insulating blanket in which the outer plies are first coated, on the sides thereof that will be innermost when the blanket is completed, with a Wax having a Ahigher melting point than the asphaltic material used for securing the intermediate ply to the outer ply and then applying the asphaltic material having a lower melting point than said wax, to the same side of the sheet to which the wax has been applied, to thus prevent the asphaltic material from working its way through the paper, or similar sheet material, that forms the outer covering of the blanket.

It isl a further purpose of my invention to provide a method of making an insulating blanket comprising applying stripes of asphaltic material, of higher melting point than that used over the major portions of the blanket, for securing the intermediate ply of the blanket to the outer plies, certain of said stripes being applied to the plies of material at such points that these will act to secure wide folds of the plies together to firmly secure these to each other, with one of said plies doubled back along the side edges of the blanket, to seal the longitudinal edges thereof.

It is a further purpose of my invention to proof forming the bodies of loose fibrous material, which may be referred to as batts, or parcels, the same in a loose fluffy condition, in forms, or pockets, removing any excess material that may overlap the pockets, or forms, therefrom by a blowing action, and depositing the material thus collected in the pockets onto the plies of the V insulating blanket length thereof.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will appear as the description of the drawings proceeds. I desire to have it understood, however, that I do not intend to limit myself to the particular details shown or described, except as defined in the claims.

In the drawings:

at the desired points along the Fig. 1 is a diagrammatc view of an apparatus Y utilized for manufacturing the insulating blanket, to illustrate the steps of the method of making the same.

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view showing the striping of high melting point asphaltic material on a ply of the blanket.

Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view through the blanket, showing the same in an intermediate step in the manufacture thereof prior to folding the marginal edges thereof.

Fig. 4 is a similar edges folded.

Fig. 5 is a similar view showing the edge flanges formed on the blanket.

Fig. 6 is a section taken through the blanket at a different point than Fig. 5, and

Fig. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal section through the blanket.

My improved insulating blanket comprises are made of fibrous sheet material, such as creped paper, and which can `be either plain or creped, as may be desired, and an intermediate ply, with alternating bodies of brous insulating material lying on opposite sides of the intermediate ply, .these overlapping each other longitudinally of the blanket. Each of the bodies of fibrous insulating material extends crosswise the full width of the insulating blanket, except for the folded flange portions provided thereon along opposite margins thereof, the fi of such material, by depositing view showing the marginal brous material being in a, loose fluffy condition and being, preferably, made of wood fiber of a character ordinarily known as wood cotton, or of waste paper, or similar material,treated to form a fluffy, fibrous cottony material thereof. The blanket is made by a method that is intended to provide pockets for the loose, uffy, fibrous insulating material to hold this material in place and to provide overlapping parcels of this material, so that substantially the same thickness of insulating material will be provided throughout the blanket, except at the flanges thereon, from end to end thereof, and in which the fluffy, fibrous insulating material is made up of loose fibers in a uffy condition, the method utilized keeping these parcels, or bodies, of such iiuify material, in their ilu'y condition. Instead of forming the pockets in the blanket and placing the iiuly, fibrous insulating material therein, the pockets are formed around the bodies of such material.

In providing a method for making such an insulating blanket it is necessary that the method be of such a character that the cost of production will not become too great and so that the material can be produced continuously and will be of such a character that it can be readily stored and shipped. In order to accomplish this the blanket is made in such a manner that it will be flexible in character and can be rolled up on itself or on a reel, so as to form bundles thereof wound or rolled on themselves spirally so that any length thereof can be unrolled and cut olf to t into any desired space that is to be insulated.

The intermediate ply in a blanket of this character must follow an undulating path in order to provide the overlapping parcels, or bodies, of insulating material in the blanket, and for this reason said intermediate ply must be considerably longer than the other plies, and in order to carry out the manufacture thereof successfully it has been found necessary that this inner ply be of a corrugated character, or of a similar character that the same can be extended to take care of the difference in length thereof required as compared with the outer or cover plies. The said bodies are shorter than the Width of the corrugated ply and are spaced apart distances somewhat less than the Width of the bodies to provide the overlap.

The method further contemplates making a blanket of the general character above referred to, that has the marginal edges of the plies thereof folded together to form a strong tight seal, which also forms a nailing strip, or flange, for securing the blanket to frame members, such as studding, for example. My method produces an insulating blanket of the general character above referred to by a continuous process.

In order that the various plies may be secured together in proper relationship to each other, the outer or covering plies are provided with adhesive means for securing the intermediate corrugated ply thereto. Each of the outer, or covering plies, is first coated on one face thereof with a wax which, preferably, has a melting point of about 150 F., and after a coating of this Wax has been applied a coating of asphaltic material having a lower melting point than the wax is applied to the same face of the web of kraft paper over the Wax coating, at a temperature of about 150 to 200 F. rIhis causes the previously applied wax to melt and drives it into the pores of the paper of the web, Where it sets, forming a seal against web of such material askraftpaper throughfthe. kraft paper to thev other Vtace thereof.

.The method can be better understood by reference to the drawings, in which the method is illustrated oliagrammatically in Figs. 1 toV 5, inclusive. Referringto Figi 1,"l the `sheet material, suchv as theV kraftpaper, is supplied from three different rolls '31, 32 andi 33 in continuous webs, which 'are indicated' in Fig. lby the numerals 34,l 35A and`36. The" web 34 is shown vas'fpassing around 'a guide roller 13.1 and in contact with a waxing roller 38,'fwhi`ch'waxing roller in turn contacts 'a drum or roller" 39 projecting into. a melted wax tank 40, which is heated in any suitable manner, as by means of a burner 4I, said then passing over suitable 'guiding means, such as a roller 42, to an asphalt applying kroller 43, whichextends into a tank of melted asphaltic material 44, which is heated'to the desired Vtemperature by any suitable means, s uch as'the'burner 45. The web 34 then*Y passes over va striping roller 46, which places a plurality of stripes of y asphaltic material thereon, said-roller extending into a body of asphaltic 'material' inthe tank 41, which is heated to the desired temperature by `a burner V48. o

iThe melting point of the wax in the tank 40 is, preferably, about 150 F., while that of the asphalti'c material in the' tank 44 is, preferably,

Vabout 1201 F., andi-,hat of the asphaltic ma- F. After theA terial in the tank 41A about 160 web of kraft paper3l4- has been passed over the striping roller 46 the same. passes around suitable a cooling nozzle I supplying-a spray 52 of cold water and air tothe side of the web, or strip, of covering material, such as has been previously coated with wax and then with the asphaltic material of lower melting point than the wax, and with the Vstri-pes of the asphaltic material of' higher melting pointthan the wax.

The web of kraft paper 35 extending from the roller 32 passes around suitable guidin'gfmeans, such .as the guide roller 53,'between a roller 54 and a roller 38', which vcontacts a drum 39' extending into the waX in the tank 40', lwhich is heated" by a burner'4l' to thus apply a coat of wax to one side of the web, or sheet, 35, after which the web, or sheet, 35 passes over an asphaltic material applying roller 43', similar to' the roller 43, extending into the asphaltic material tank 44' and heated by any suitable means, such as the burner 45', the wax appliedv by the'v roller 38 being of the same character. asr that applied tothe web, or sheet, of kraft paper 34 by means of the roller 38, and the asphaltic material applied to the web 35 by the roller 43 being the same as that applied to the web 34 by the roller I 43. Thus when the web 35 has passed the roller 43' it will have a wax Vcoating 'applied thereto under an asphaltic coating, which asphaltic coating has a'lower melting' point than the wax coating. A striping roller 46'. similar to the roller- 46, and operating in a tank of asphaltic ma-- terial 41', similarto the tank of asphaltic material 41', and heated by a burner 48', is provided to apply the stripes of asphaltic material having a higher melting point.V than that applied by the roller l43 to the web, or sheet, 35'. After passing over the roller 46' the web,or sheet, 35 passes over a gou-idev rollerA 55 and under a guide roller 5`6 -to carry the same past a nozzle' 5I thatsupplies a cooling'spray 52 ofwwater and air tothe kraft paper, that guide rollers 49 and 5l) to' carry the same past asphaltic material.

Vare made of somewhat o 6 o o side oftheweb4 athathas been; previously coated with the wax, the lower melting point asphalt-ic material and the. 'stripes of higher melting point The cooling nozzles 5l and 5l" cool theasphaltic material on thel surface of 'the webs to the point. where the same is still tacky, but 'no longer in a molten condition, the lower melting point asphaltic material being. substantially a water proofing material, while the higher meltingnpoint asphaltic material is substantially a cementing material, and this cementing material applied in stripes as above referred to willserve to secure the plies together as the steps of the method proceed.

The web 3.5 of brous sheet material, suchas kraft paper, is. guided by means of suitable rollers 51 between a pair of corrugating rolls 58, becoming a crimped, or corrugated, ply 36 after passing through said rolls, A pair of hoppers 59 'and 60 are provided for the loose cottony iibrous -insulatingrmaterial that is used in myimproved insulatingl blanket, any suitable means being Plovided for maintaining the Wooly, or cottony, brous -material in a loose uffy condition in said hoppers. Drums 6I and 62 are provided, which are located below the hoppers 59 and 66, respectively,

lower portions of said hoppers are locateddirectly vover the curved surfaces of the Ydrums and near the upper portions of said drums.

The drum 6| rotates in a counter-clockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 1, and the drum 62 in a clockwise direction;

The surfaces of both drums are provided with forms, or pockets, 65, which alternate with shallow recesses 66 formed between said forms 65 on the surfaces of said drums. Said forms are merely rectangular pan-.like members of suitable curved outline along the end walls thereof, to

.conform to the curvature of the side walls of the hoppers 59 and 66 at the openings 63 and 64, so

Vas to providea suiiiciently close fit that the fluffy loose ibrous material 61 contained in the hoppers .5B and'! will bedeposited on the surfaces of the drums 6| and 62 and will not escape between the hopper walls andthe drums. The forms are of suitable shape to form parcels, or bodies, of the iiuffy' brous insulating material of suitable length and width to occupy the pockets to be formed between the intermediate and outer plies. I n order to properly fill these pockets, the forms greater depth than the pockets that arev to be illed. The material will thus be under compression to a suiiicient extent that the pockets will be completely lled without there being any air pockets, or voids, therein, as will be explained below. The corrugated ply 36' .passes around aportion of the drum 6 I, substanrecesses, or spaces, 66 and this is, preferably, .done'by blowing the material transversely outof these spaces. As the forms, or pockets, 65 have end walls and the spaces 66 do not have any end walls, an air discharge nozzle 68 is provided at one side of each of the drums 6l and Y52 adjacent the hoppers, at a point immediately afterv the surface'oi the drum leaves the hoppers,

'to discharge a blast ofair endwise into the spaces in such a position that the openingsy 63 f and 64 in the ylili across the surface of the drum, blowing the material 6'! out of the spaces 66, any` suitable means for supplying the blast of airto the nozzle 68 being provided, such as the conduit ESS extending from the blower l0. The fluffy fibrous insulating material discharged from these spaces is, of course, collected and returned to the hopipeI'S.

It will be obvious that the corrugated ply 35' passes over the open tops of the forms 65 and these discharge their contents' onto thecorrugated ply as these travel to an inverted position toward the bottom of the drum, when said corrugated ply will be extending substantially horizontally. 'I'he corrugated ply 36 leaves the drum 6i and passes around substantially half of `the drum 32 in an opposite direction to that in which it passes around the drum 6 I The drums 6I and 52, it will be noted, are so related to each other that the form portions 65 thereof are out of alignment with each other where the same approach each other,v intermeshing in a similar manner to gear teeth, that is, the form 55 of the drum align with the spaces 66 of the other drum at the points of closest approach to each otherof the-drums, the drums being substantially the thickness of the blanket interengaged with each other. After the corrugated ply passes from the one drum to the other, the bodiesy I4 of the insulating material l are located on one side thereof, which is the top side of the corrugated ply at this time. The web 33, which forms the outer ply Il of the finished blanket passes around a guide roller l'I and then around the drum 62 outside the corrugated ply 36 so that the bodies, or parcels, I4 of the insulating material are mounted between the web 34 that forms the covering ply, and the corrugated ply 35', with the corrugated ply 3S overlying the open tops of the forms 55 on the drum 32. As the two plies move forward at the same `rate as the surface of the 'drum 62, the corrugated ply 36 and the web 34 of thecovering material pass around the surface of the drum with the bodies I4 located in spaced relation between these, the corrugated ply v36 being gradually inverted as it passes around said drum. 'Ihe contents of the pockets 65 of the drum 62 are deposited on top of the corrugated ply 35' as the same leaves the drum at the bottom thereof during the rotation of the drum 62, the bodies, or parcels, I 5 being staggered relative to the bodies, or parcels, ifi, as will be evident from Fig. l, and slightly overlapping the same due to the natural tendency of the material to spread as it leaves the pockets. As the web made up of the corrugated and plain web portions and the bodies cf fluffy fibrous insulating material passes over the guide roller 55, the

web, or ply, 35 is added thereto at the top thereof.

The stripping rollers d6 and 46' apply, preferably, four stripes of the asphaltic material of higher melting point to the side of the web 34 that is uppermost after the drum 62 has been passed and the side of the web 35 that is lowermost after the guide roll 5S has been passed. This is diagrammaticaily illustrated in Fig. 2, in which the ply, or web, 34

stripes I3 applied thereto. Thus these stripes of `asphaltic material will be on the sides of the covering plies that are next to the corrugated ply and are, preferably, relatively narrow, in the standard form of insulating blanket in which the bodies, or parcels, of loose fluffy fibrous material lying between the flanges 21, `are fourteen and is shown with such -tions of the plies II,

one-half inches long, being about an inch wide, and two of the stripes being placed adjacent the side edges of the webs 34 and 35 and the other two stripes being also about an inch Vwide and being spaced substantially about equal distances from each other and the two outermost stripes.

The cooling nozzles cool the stripes of asphaltic material on the surfaces of the webs 34 and 35 tothe point where the same are tacky, but no longer in a molten condition. As a result, if very slight pressure is applied to the assembled webs 34, 35 and 36', with the parcels of insulating material I4 and I5 between the same to contact the corrugated web, or ply, with the outer webs, or plies, these will be united and be xed relative to each other due to the provision of the stripes of high melting point asphaltic material. Also the parcels I4 and I5 will be somewhat distorted out of the shape that these had due to being deposited from the forms, or pockets, 65 and the corrugated ply will assume the undulating form substantially that shown in Fig. '7, and to the left of the guide roll 56 in Fig. 1, the web portion 35 now becoming' the outer ply I 2,`the web portion 34 nowbecoming the outer ply II, and the corrugated web portion 36 becoming the intermediate ply I3, with the parcels I4 and I5 spread so as to overlap each other and completely ll the pockets formed between the plies II and I3, and I2 ,and I3. 'Ihe corrugated web portion 36 is given an undulating form, as shown in Fig. l, as it passes between the intermeshing drums Si and 62, which makes the same follow a longer path than it did before passing therebetween, the corrugations permitting such stretching of the web portion 36 as is necessary to accomplish this by attening out, the curvature of the corrugations in the finished sheet being somewhat exaggerated in the drawings, as the same are usually flattened out more than shown. A certain amount of tension is created due to the pressure eXerted by the contents of the pockets, in the finished blanket, which holds the pockets in proper relative position in the blanket in their overlapped interfltting relation.

A roll 72 may be provided, cooperating with the roll to apply the necessary pressure to the plies to secure the same together in the manner above referred to. These rolls are spaced far enough apart, of course, that the parcels of insulating material will not be compressed to any substantial extent, but only sufficiently to spread the same into all the remote portions of the pocket that is formed.

Upon reference to Fig. 3 it will be seen that the ply I I is narrower than the corrugated ply I3, and that the ply I 2 is still wider than the corrugated ply I3. The portion 'I4 of the ply I2 that extends beyond the lateral edge of the ply I 3 is not coated by the asphaltic material of high melting point, and, edges of the ply I I are on the side thereof facing the ply I 3. Accordingly, when the web made up of the various plies above referred to passes between the sealing rollers "I5, the engaging por- I2 and I3 adjacent their edges are compressed together to be firmly secured to each other by the pressure exerted on put on by the striping rollers near the edges of the plies II and I2. A fiat three ply edge portion of the blanket is thus formed, which is to be folded on itself and sealed in folded position, as shown in Fig. 4.

To accomplish this, a striping roller 'I6 is provided, which extends into the tank 'Il having of course, the stripes near the portion of the ply similar to that Contained in the tanks 41 and 41', the composite web passing over the striping roller 'I6 and said roller applying the stripes of the higher melting point asphaltic material to the under side of the ply l2 near, but spaced from the longitudinal side edges thereof and may apply said asphaltic material to the adjacent marginal portions of the ply l2 if desired, the composite web passing through the machine and engaging folding mechanism 13, which turns the striped I2 at each sideedge downwardly and back on itself to form the fold, or ply, 20, pressure rollers 19 being provided for similarly pressing-the 'various plies together in the folded position Shown in Fig. 4. A folding mechanism 8@ for flangin'gupwardly the flanges 21, which are made up of the various plies folded over each other in the manner described, 'is then `engaged by the web.- The insulating blanket is now complete and mayY pass from the mechanism in `any desired manne-i to be rolled up' or other- Wise arranged for shipping purposes.

It will be noted that the method of making the insulating blanket thus comprises placing parcels,

Aor formed bodies, of loose fluffy insulating material on a corrugated intermediate ply on opposite sides thereof in staggered relation to each other, enclosing v'these parcels between a lower covering or outer ply,- or web-ofbrous'material;.such as -kraf-tpaper, and said corrugated plyjsaid outer ply havingl previously been first coated with val wax having ahigher melting point and with an asphaltic moisture lproofing and sealingrnaterial that is next applied thereto, and vbeing lastly coated with stripes of an asphaltic material having a higher melting lpoint than the wax before said web portion is brought into cooperative relation to the corrugated ply and the parcels of loose fluffy insulating material, and that subsequently another web, similarly coated with 'wax and the two asphaltic materials, is applied to the exposed side ofthe corrugated'ply havingspaced parcels of the loose fluffy insulating material thereon.

The method constitutes further the stepsof applying the loose fluffy insulating material first to the corrugated ply in a loose ufy'condition, the

`deposit thereofbeing made by gravity withoutany appreciable pressure being applied to the material, and the material beingY condition until all ofthe plies before mentioned havev been placed into vproper relative position to each other, whereupon pressure is applied to the whole, sufficient to Yforce vthe fluffy fibrous material into all portions of theV pockets formedbetween the corrugated plyand the covering plies, at the same time securing the covering plies and corrugated ply in relatively fixed position to each other at spaced points, andv extending the. corrugated ply so that the same will assumer a circuitous path, comprising portions extending substantially parallel to and engaging the outer plies, and portions extending obliquely between Vthese portions that extend` parallel to' the outer plies, as will be evidenti-rom, Fig. '7, the pressure applied being such as not to unduly compact the insulating material, so rthat it will-retain nearly all of its, original flufliness, but be under slight compression. f Y Y It fwill Vbe noted that the method further comprises securing together and sealing the over-A lapping edges of the plies vabove referred to and folding the same to fold one of the v outerplies around the outer edges of the other plies 'to provide a thick edge, which is completely sealed, and

left inY such loose fluffy vflanges thereon, adhesive asphaltic material being applied Yto the blanket after rthe edges thereof have been sealed together and prior to the first folding step, whereby the one ply is folded around the other two plies of the edges thereof, and se cured thereto.

Thel purpose vof the stripes l0 of the asphaltic material having. the higher melting point is primarily to fasten together the edges of the three sheets as these engage in going through the machine, at a higher temperature than would be possible with the water proofing asphaltic material 26 applied-by the rollers 38 and 38. Even though thel asphaltic coatings are cooled with water, by the cooling spray at 52 and 52', no more water can be applied than will evaporate from the sheet before it is incorporated in the blanket,

and as a result a final tempera-ture of from 100 While considerable pressure is applied to the rmarginal edges of the sheets where the flaps are 4that is, from 50 to 130 passes over the lower drum length in the intermediate ply,

formed to seal them, and these will seal under this pressure at a wide variation in temperature, Y F., on the other hand, only a very slight -VApressure is exertedV on the fibrous portion of the,A blanket, so'that the fibers will remain in a fluffy condition, and for that reason a very tacky asphalt of very low melting point -is used for securing the intermediate ply to the covering plies over that4 portion of the blanket where the fluffy insulating material is incorporated therein.v Itis be congealed as the `blanket comes off the machine, as experience has shown that all that is necessary is to have such tackiness as to hold they middle sheet in place, which is accomplished bymeans of the stripes I. The blanket can then be rolled up and placedin cartons after it leaves the machine, where itdwill go through the final cooling step and solidification of the soft asphaltic material 26. The harder asphaltic stripes adjacent the side edges of thek plies are sufficient tohold the middle or intermediate ply in position relative to the covering plies, and while the stripes of the harder asphaltic material in the middle portion of the Webs, or sheets, helps to hold the middle, or intermediate, ply tothe covering plies while the blanket is hot, it isvnot absolutely necessary to provide these intermediate or central stripes. Y

The corrugating rolls 5,8 measure the amount of paper or fibrous material that is fed to form vthe intermediate ply. As the corrugated ply K 62 at the same lineal speed as the lcircumference of the drum is rotating, and as the lower sheet also travels at such same lineal speed, there is considerable excess vor sheet, 365, as the Vsame leaves the drum 62. The crimping, or corrugating, rolls are rotated at a definite ratio to the rotation of the drums 6I and 62, so that the exact amount of excess is determined. The excess is, preferably, just slightly more than sufficient to take care of .the change in length of the not essential that this il web' 36 as the pockets are formed for the loose `fibrous material at the point of engagement with ythe rollers 56 and l2, and thus in the finished blanket the corrugations are almost stretched out and only a slight crimping is noticeable. The rim portions of the forms 65 on the drums 5I -and 62 act to pull the corrugated ply through marginal portions of the outer webs 34 and 35, so

that said rollers only very slightly compress the -fluiy fibrous material to force it completely in-to all portions of the pockets, but exerting a greater pressure on the marginal portions to secure these rmly together.l These rollers remove the blanket from the drum 62 as rapidly as it is deposited at the bottom thereof, so as to keep 'tension on the outside covering sheets, but none on the corrugated middle sheet, or ply.

While themiddle sheet, or ply, 36 is shown l as being wider than the formed bodies of loose fibrous material, this is not absolutely essential, as these bodies could be held in place, even if the .intermediate ply did not extend into the flaps of the blanket, but were merely wide enough to `weave back and forth from the other through the libro-us Whatclaimis: l

1. Invthe method of making an insulating blanket, forming loose bodies of uffy brous insulating material, depositing the same in spaced relation on acontinuous web of Ilexible sheet material in slack condition, placing a continuous web of sheet material in position over said web having said bodies thereon, inverting said webs 'with saidbodies therebetween tov place said web -in slack condition over said bodies, forming other loose bodies of fluffy fibrous insulating material, and depositing the same on said slack continuous web of sheet material in staggered relation to said lirst mentioned bodies.

2. In the method of making an insulating blanket, liorming -loose bodies of iluffy brous one covering ply to filling.

insulating material, depositing the same in spaced relation-on a continuous web of corrugated sheet material, placing a continuous web of sheet material in position over said web vhaving said bodies thereon, inverting said webs with said bodies therebetween to place said corrugated web s.;

over said bodies, forming other loose bodie-s of uiy brous insulating material, depositing said last mentioned bodies on said corrugated web in staggered relation to said first mentioned bodies, and placing a continuous web or sheet material in position over said corrugated web.

Y 3. The method of making an insulating blanket comprising forming elongated loose bodies of fluiy iibrous insulating material, depositing the same transversely on a continuous web of corlrugated sheet material in Yequidistantly spaced relation longitudinally of said web, placing a continuous web of sheet material in position over said web having said bodies thereon, inverting said webs with said bodies therebetween to place said web in slack condition over said bodies, forming other elongated loose bodies of iluiiy fibrous insulating material, depositing said last mentioned bodies transversely on said corrugated web in spaced staggered relation to said iirst 12 mentioned bodies, placing a continuous web of sheet material over said corrugated web, and securing said webs together at their points of engagement.

4. In the method ofv making an insulating blanket, placing loose pre-formed bodies of iluiy compressible insulating material between each of two cover plies and an extensible intermediate ply of sheet material in overlapping staggered relation to each other, to form walls of pockets for said bodies between said plies, and securing said cover plies to said intermediate ply and simultaneously applying pressure to said blanket suiiicient to extend said intermediate ply and form said'ply around said bodies to form said pockets and force said insulating material into all por-tions -ofs-aid pockets withoutcompacting the same.

5. In the method Vof making an insulating blanket, placing loose pre-formed bodies of uiy compressible insulating material between each of two flat cover plies and a corrugated intermediate ply of sheet material in overlapping staggered relation to each other, to form walls of alternating pockets for said bodies between said plies, and securing said cover plies to said intermediate ply and simultaneously applying pressure to said blanket suicient to extend the corrugations of said intermediate ply and form said ply around said bodies to Yform said pockets and iorce said insulating material into all portions of said pockets Without compacting the same.

6. The method of making an insulating blanket comprising forming loose bodies of uiy brous insulating material, depositing the same in spaced relation on a continuous web of extensible sheet material, placing a continuous web of sheet material in position over said web having said bodies thereon, inverting said webs with said bodies therebetween to place said extensible web over said bodies, forming other loose bodies of fluffy fibrous insulatingV material, depositing the vsame on said extensible web in spaced relation over the spaces between said first mentioned bodies,

-rplacing a continuous web of sheet material in position over said extensible web, and securing the engaging portions of said webs together.

7. The method of making an insulating blanket comprising ,forming elongated loose bodies of iluiy fibrous insulating material, depositing the same transversely ona continuous web of corrugated sheet material in equidistantly spaced relation, the spaces between said bodies being less than the widths thereof, placing a continuous web of sheet material in position over said web having said bodies thereon, inverting said webs with said bodies therebetween to place said corrugated web over said bodies, forming other elongated loose bodies of fluffy fibrous insulating material of substantially the same width as said rst mentioned bodies, depositing said last mentioned bodies transversely on said corrugated web in spaced staggered relation to said first mentoned bodies, the spaces between said last mentioned bodies being less than the widths thereof, the bodies on opposite sides of said corrugated web overlapping each other lengthwise of said web, placing a continuous web of sheet material in position over said corrugated web, and securing said webs together at their points of engagement.

8. The method of making an insulating blanket comprising forming elongated loose bodies of uffy brous insulating material, depositing the same transversely on a continuous web of corru- 1S gated sheet-materialin equidistantly'spaeed relation, the' spaces betweenV said bod-ies'being less than thewidths thereof, placing a continuous web of sheet materialfin position over said web having said bodies thereon, ,inverting said webs withsaidbodies therebetween to place said corrugated web yover said bodies, forming other elon gated loose ybodies of fluffy fibrous insulating material of substantially the same width as said first mentioned bodies, depositing said last mentioned bodies transversehT on said corrugated web in spaced" staggered relation to said rst mentioned bodies, lthespaces between said last mentioned bodies being less `than the widths thereof, theybodies-on opposite sides of` said corrugated weboverlapping each other lengthwise of said web, said bodies being shorter than the width of said webs and having both ends thereof spaced from the margins of saidv webs,*placing a continuous web of sheet material wider v'than the length of said bodies in position over said corrugatedY web, and securing" said webs together at their` points of engagement.

9. In'I the method,l of4 making an insulating` blanket, forming loosel bodiesof 'fluffy lfibrous insulating*"material,v depositingthe same by gravity on' apontinuous web :of corrugated sheet 'material, placing a continuous web of sheet material wider than the length of said bodies in position over said web having said bodies thereon, inverting said webs with said Ybodies therebetween to place said corrugated web over said bodies, forming other loose bodies of fluffy iibrous insulating material, depositing said last mentioned bodies on said corrugated web by gravity in stag# gered relation to said first mentioned bodies, placing a continuous web of sheet material wider than the length of said bodies in position over said corrugated web, and securing said webs together at their points of engagement.

10. In the method of making an insulating blanket, preforming loose bodies of fluffy insulating material, coating continuous webs of sheet material with adhesive water proofing material, applying a plurality of adhesive material of higher melting point than said coating to said webs, inserting a web of corrugated sheet material with bodies'of said insulating material on opposite sides thereof between two webs of said Asheet material, and

' pressing adjacent faces of said webs into engagement with each other to cause said stripes to hold webs and bodies in predetermined relationship to each other.

11. In the method of making an insulating blanket, pre-forming loose bodies of fluffy insulating material, coating continuous webs of sheet material with adhesive water proofing material in molten condition, applying a plurality of longitudinal stripes of adhesive material of higher melting point than said coating to said webs in molten condition, inserting a web of corrugated sheet material with bodies of said insulating material on opposite sides thereof between two webs of said sheet material, and pressing adjacent faces of said webs into engagement with each other to cause said stripes to hold said Webs and bodies in predetermined relationship to each other.

Y l2. In the method of making an insulating blanket, pre-'forming loose'bodies of fluffy insulating material, coating continuous webs of sheet material with adhesive water proongmaterial in molten condition, applying a plurality of longitudinal stripes of adhesive material of higher longitudinal stripes of 14 meitingfpoiritthan said costing tosaid'webs in molten condition, cooling said webs sufficiently to-'leave said stripes in a'tacky condition, insertingv aweb yof corrugated sheet material with bodies of said insulating material on opposite sidesfthereof between two webs of said sheet material, and pressing adjacent faces of said webs intoY engagement with each other to cause said stripes tohold said webs and bodies in termined relationship to each other.

i3. In the method of making an insulating blanket, applying a coating'of a wax to one face of a web of fibrous sheet material, applying a coating of asphaltic material having a lower melting point than said Wax to said web overk said Wax coating', applying stripes of an asphaltic A material havinga higher melting point than said'asphaltic coating' to said web longitudinally thereof at a temperature above "the melting point of said asphaltic coating and immediately sprayinga cooling'-uid on said web to reducethe temperature of said stripes sufficiently to changevthe same to a tacky state and set'said wax coating.

y le, In the method of making an insulating lanket, pre-forming loose bodies Aof fluffy insulatingmaterial, coating continuous websV of sheet material with adhesive water proong material on one face thereof'applying a plurality oflong'i. tudinal stripes o f adhesive material of higher melting point than said coating to said webs on the same face thereof, placing bodies of said insulating material in spaced relation in engagement kwith one face of a web of extensible sheet material, bringing a web of said coated sheet material into position in proximity to said extensible web with the coated face thereof facing the face of said web engaged by said bodies of insulating material to connue said bodies of insulating material between said Webs, placing other bodies of said insulating material in spaced relation in engagement with the other face of said extensible web, bringing a second web of said coated sheet material into position in proximity to said extensible web with the coated face thereof facing said other face of said extensible web, and engaging said webs at the portions thereof exposed to each other to secure said webs together by means of said stripes.

l5. In the method of making an insulating blanket, pre-forming loose uify bodies of insulating material, applying adhesive coating material to continuous webs of sheet material on one face thereof, placing bodies of said insulating material in spaced relation in engagement with one face of a web of extensible sheet material, bringing a web of said coated sheet material into position in proximity to said extensible web with l the coated face thereof facing the face of said web engaged by said bodies of insulating material to conne said bodies of kinsulating material between said webs, placing other bodies of said insulating material in spaced relation in engagement with the other face of said extensible web, bringing a second web of said coated sheet material into position in proximity to said extensible web with the coated face thereof facing said other face of said extensible web, and engaging said webs at the portions thereof exposed to each other to secure said webs together.

16. In the method of making an insulating blanket, pre-forming loose iluify bodies of insulating material, applying adhesive coating material to continuous webs of sheet material on one face thereof, placing bodies of ysaid insulating material in spaced relation in engagement with prede-y Y 15 one face of a web of extensible sheet material, bringing a web of said coated sheet material into position in proximity to said extensible Web With the coated face thereof facing the face of said web engaged by said bodies of insulating material to confine said bodies of insulating material between said webs, placing other bodies of said insulating material in spaced relation in engage- Yment with the other face of said extensible Web in staggered relation to said iirst mentioned bodies, bringing a second web of said coated sheet material into position in proximity to said extensible web With the coated face' thereof facing said other face of said extensible web, and compressing said composite body of Webs and bodies of insulating material sufficiently to extend said extensible Web to form pockets in cooperation with said coated webs and engage the exposed adjacent portions of said Webs with each other to cause the same to adhere to each other and force said insulating material into all portions of said pockets Without destroying the ilufness of said bodies of insulating material.V

17. In the method of making an insulating blanket, pre-forming loose bodies of iiuffy insulating material, coating continuous Webs of sheet material with adhesive water proofing material on one face thereof, applying a plurality of lon- '16 gitudinal stripes of adhesive material ofhigher melting point than said coating to said Webs on the same face thereof, placing bodies of said insulating material in spaced relation in engagement with one face of a Web of extensible sheet material, bringing Va web of said coated sheet material into position in proximity to said extensible web With the coated face thereof facing the face of said web engaged by` said bodies of insulating material to confine said bodies of insulating material between said Webs, placing other bodies of said insulating material in spaced relation in engagement with the other face of said extensible web in staggered relation to said rst mentioned bodies, bringing a second web of said coated sheet material into position in proximity to said extensible webwith the coated face thereof facing said other face of said extensible web, and compressing said composite body of Webs and bodies of insulating material sufficiently to extend said extensible web to form pockets in cooperation with said coated Webs and engage the `exposed adjacent portions of said Webs with each other to cause the stripes to secure said extensible web to said other webs andlforce said insulating material into all portions of said pockets without destroying the luiness of said bodies of insulating material. WILLIAM B. BYERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3145515 *Apr 24, 1962Aug 25, 1964Union Carbide CorpManufacture of multi-layer insulated structure
US3905858 *Jan 23, 1974Sep 16, 1975Vistron CorpApparatus for preparing striped sheet material continuously
US4720321 *Jun 26, 1985Jan 19, 1988Keyes Fibre CompanyMethod and apparatus for manufacturing packaging pads
Classifications
U.S. Classification156/62.2, 156/552, 156/303, 156/549, 156/90, 425/81.1, 156/471, 156/301
International ClassificationD21J1/16, E04B1/76
Cooperative ClassificationE04B1/767, D21J1/16
European ClassificationD21J1/16, E04B1/76E2B1F