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Publication numberUS2407769 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 17, 1946
Filing dateNov 16, 1943
Priority dateNov 16, 1943
Publication numberUS 2407769 A, US 2407769A, US-A-2407769, US2407769 A, US2407769A
InventorsJohn F Anderson
Original AssigneeJohn F Anderson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drilling vise
US 2407769 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 7, 1945-v J. F. ANDERSON 1 2,407,769

DRILLING VISE Filed Nov. 16, 1943 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 ,Y/IVVEI-VJTOR M JOHN E ANDERS N ATTORNEY.

Sept. 17, 1946 .1. F. ANDERSON DRILLING VISE Filed Nov. 16, 1945 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 M! van/r02 do /1v I? ANDERSON A TTORNEY.

Sept 1946- J. F. ANDERSON DRILLING VISE Filed Nov. 16, 1945 s Sheets-She 3 P I .r j u J a 82 L/ a 75 4 V nw /vrok JOHN F ANDERSO BY- v AT'TQA NEX I Patented Sept. 17, 1946 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE DRILLING VISE John F. Anderson, Oakland, Calif.

Application November 16, 1943, Serial No. 510,519 11 Claims. (c1. 77- 62) This invention relates to machine shop devices to facilitate the drilling of holes in definite places in various pieces of work, and generally termed drilling Vises or drilling jigs," and which devices are adapted to clamp or otherwise hold the work in place while it is being drilled.

The object of the invention is to provide an improved drilling vise of this character which will expedite the accurate locating of holes to be drilled into the work. Specific features and advantages of the invention will appear in the following description and accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view showing the general appearance of my improved drilling vise.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the device.

Fig. 3 is an end view of the device taken from the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a broken rear elevation of the device and shows the rack-bar clamps which hold the slidable jaw clamped against the work.

Fig. 5 is a plan view of a revolvable table attachment.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary elevation of one of the revolvable tables, showing its work holding jaws.

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of an attachment drill bushing arm, which cooperates with the main drill bushing arm when desired to drill more than one hole in the work, at one setting.

Before describing the drawings in detail, the invention maybe generally described as a fiat base plate with a pair of vise jaws projecting upwardly therefrom and between which the work is clamped while an adjustable arm carrying a drill guiding hole or bushing overlies the work and by means of cross feeds may quickly be brought with great accuracy to any precise point over the work where a hole is desired to be drilled Certain attachments provide for drilling a plurality of accurately located holes in repetition work, also circular rows of holes.

In the drawings I is the fiat base plate adapted to be placed on and moved about the table of a drill press, and which base plate is provided with a fixed upstanding wall or jaw 2 extending along its forward edge, and a cooperating but slidably arranged similar rear wall or jaw 3 which is provided with transversely extending guides 4 at opposite ends engaging suitably rabbeted end edges 5 of the base plate so that the rear jaw can approach the fixed front jaw to grip or clamp any desired block, rod, bar, or other shaped piece of work between the jaws as in a vise, with the work positioned under the drill locating arm 6 which projects transversely across the front wall and may be adjusted to any position.

The drill locating arm 6 has a vertically disposed hole I at its end overhanging the work in which is positioned a drill guiding bushing 8 (generally of hardened steel) and which is clamped in place as by a screw I6 passing laterally through the extreme end of the arm which is split as at H! to make it compressible against the bushing. The drill bushing is interchangeable with others for every size drill used, but all having the same outer diameter, tho very small ones may of course fit into the bores of the larger ones if desired.

A piece of work in the form of a block is shown clamped in position between the jaws 2 and 3 in Fig. 3 in dotted lines I2 and with a drill dotted at I3 in position just over the bushing 8, while'to support the work up as close as possible to the bushing the clamping jaws 2 and 3 are provided with several vertical and horizontal rows of confronting aligned horizontally extending holes I4 into which loose rods I5 are freely slidable and upon which the work rests. The work may be blocked up with shims or filler plates where its thickness or peculiar form may so require.

Arm 6 is mounted for longitudinal sliding movement in a carriage I6 which in turn is slidably mounted on suitable guides I1, I8 formed on or secured to the front jaw 2, for slidable movement along the front jaw at right angles to the movement of the arm 6 on the carriage so that the drill bushing can readily be brought to any desired point over the work from end to end of the clamping jaws or breadth of the base plate.

The two sliding members 6 and I6 are preferably adjustably gibbed to their guides respectively as at I9 and 20 to take up all slack, and the arm 6 may be locked to carriage I6 as by a screw 2|, and the carriage locked to its guides as by a screw 22, working on the gib plates. Arm 6 is moved back and forth by a hand screw 23 operated by a handle 24 like a lathe tool carriage and the arm carries a pointer mark 25 on both edges moving along graduated scales 26 formed on the confronting guide edges of the carriage, while the hub of the handle carries a frictionally circumferentially adjustable graduated ring 27 cooperating with a pointer mark 28 on the end of .the arm 6 for fine adjustment of the drill bushing to precise position. Such construction consists essentially of rotatably mounting the graduated ring on a turned down portion of the hub and suitably retarding itsfree rotation as by the r 3 interposition of friction material and/or by suitable spring pressure.

Preferably the carriage is provided with a pocket 29 for carrying sundry wrench rods 30 to fit the various clamping and adjusting screws of the device.

Carriage It is moved in either direction along its guides by a lead screw 3| extending the length of the base plate and supported in end bearings 32, 53 like a lathe leadscrew, except that preferably both ends are fitted with a graduated ring 3c, 35 reading against pointer marks 35, .3

on the bearings. Preferably the graduated rings are frictionally adjustable so they can be manually'turned to set their zeros against the fixed pointers whenever desired.

The arm moving screw 23 engages threads in a plug 38 inserted in the carriage, and the car.- riage lead screw it engages threads in a plug is inserted in the carriage.

Thecarriage lead screw is operated by a handle is secured to a short vertical shaft 4| mounted in a bearing member 52 projecting from the near end of front wall or jaw, and which shaft carries a relatively large bevel gear 43 meshing with a bevel pinion is of half its diameter secured to the projecting end of the lead screw so that each turn of the handle will equal two turns of the screw for simplifying computations as to the distance of travel of the carriage, as the screw is preferably inch pitch and the travel therefore 7 is one-quarter inch.

The pitch of the cross feed or arm screw 23 is similarly of some aliquot portion of an inch and matching or divisible into the carriage cross graduations 2%. Also, there is preferably a graduated scale 4'5 formed along the edge :of the front jaw 2 which may be read against a pointer line preferably located on the far edge of the car-- ridge and which will register with the first line of the scale 45 when the center of the drill bushing carried by arm 6 is in line with the edge of a reversible stopdfi on the front jaw against which the work be abutted, and which is one inch from the first graduation of the scale which is accordingly designated I.

By the graduated scales and fine reading disks or-rings and relation of threads above described, itwill be seen that the bushing or drill center may be quickly brought to any precise point over the work with relation to any line along scale A or from the end of the work a ainst stop 45 with great accuracy.

Instead of providing the conventional vise screws for clamping jaws 2 and 3 against the work, I obtain greater clearance for the work by providing a pair of spaced rack bars 41 formed in or secured in recesses in the base plate I as by screws 55, and which rack bars have rack teeth 38 extending straight across the bars, beveled at one end as at 49, and concaved on top to each match the curve of a, short round rack plug. 5i! mounted to rotate in a round recess 51 in the rearjaw is and formed with a circular rack 52' over portion of its circumference only and with an adjacent flat side 53, so that when the plugs areturned with their fiat sides over their respective rack bars they will be free of contact with the bars and the rear jaw 2 may therefore bepushed back and forth along the base plate or snugly against the work to be clamped in place, and when the plugs are then given a quarter turn as by their handles 54 the teeth of the plugs (being similarly beveled at the ends) will engage the teeth of the rack bars to lock the plugs against relative longitudinal movement, and after which the rear jaw is forced forward into tighter clamping position by pressure screws 55 which are threaded longitudinally entirely through the plugs to bear at their inner ends against the closed inner ends 5| of recesses 5|.

The plugs 5i) extend rearwardly from the rear jaw and are kept from coming out when disen gaged from the rack bars, as by a .small keeper 5? slidably seated in a groove 58 and formed with a hooked end El" engaging a circular groove 59 formed in the plug, and the keeper resiliently forced forward by a small coiled compression spring fill lying in groove 58 and reacting against a stop pin This construction permits backing up of the plugs relative to the rear jaw 3 when the pressure screws '55 are applied, while insuring the plugs being resiliently urged inwardly in their recesses when not under pressure.

In case it is desired to locate two or more holes for drilling the work, one or morea-uxiliary bushing arms may be used'and simply clamped rigidly to the carriage guides 51, I8 spaced from or adjacent either end-of the carriage. Such an auxiliary arm is shown in Fig. 7 at 62 with a drill bushing '8 at one end, and the other end slotted at 63 and bolted as at 64 to a block 65 formed to fit over the guides E'i, l8 and clamped at any place therealong as by a screw '65. Several of these may be'used at once if desired and the extending may be made of any shape desired to reach the spot where the hole is to be drilled. Such auxiliary arms must of course be adjusted by measurement and then clamped in place.

For the drilling of circular rows of holes I provide the attachment shown in Figs. 5 and 6 and which is used after removing the rear jaw 3 from the base plate and which exposes a round hole 61 drilled in the top of the plate to receive a pin d5 which projects centrally below a round plate or disk 68 bearing a circular scale 6'9 about its lower edge for reading against a suitable mark 'lil formed on the base plate, while projecting upward from the top of the disk 68 are several lugs or jaws ll slidably mounted in radial guiding grooves 12 adapted to be moved toward the center of the disk to embrace and hold various shaped work pieces which it is desired to drill.

These jaws are each provided with a foot portion 1 I fitted with two base screws 13 adapted to respectively screw into rows of staggered tapered holes i l in the disk so that the jaws can be firmly secured at various positions along the guides 12 to approximately suit the piece of work to be held, and after which pressure screws 15 projecting radially through the upper ends of the jaws may be operated to tightly impinge the work and hold it immovable.

The work may be supported directly upon the disk, or blocked up as may be required, but to facilitate holding the work at the desired elevation, I provide several holes 16 through each jaw fitted with loose pins H which may be pulled out or inserted into any of the holes to project inward for supporting the work when held between the jaws.

In use, the disk is revolved to bring the work under the overhanging drill bushing arm '6 as required', and to prevent the disk from revolvin during the drilling operation a suitable c1amping plate 18 which overlaps a shoulder 19 formed around the edge of the disk, is tightened down against the base plate as by screw 86 which srlzrezws into tapped holes 8| provided in the base p a e.

With the use of the disk it is manifest that circular rows of holes may be drilled into the work held on the .disk by the jaws H and accurately spaced radially by slidably adjusting the drill bushing arm 6, or spaced circularly by turning the disk to the next desired graduation along the scale 69.

Since in use, many different size drill bushings are required I therefore preferably provide pockets on recesses throughout the structure wherever practicable to receive them when not in place on the arm 6 and some such bushin recesses are indicated along the rear edge of the base plate by the dotted linesj82 and with any suitable retainer to keep them from falling out, such as a wire latch 83.

It may be mentionedthat in Fig. 1 the large bevel gear 43is shown covered by a sheet metal inverted cup 84, but which is broken away in Fig. 2 to expose the gear below, I

Having thus described 'my improved drillin vise and progressively explained its manner of use, what I claim is l 1. In a drilling vise of the character described,

a pair of cooperating relatively movable elongated jawsfor'clamping between them the work to be drilled, a carriage mounted on and to slide along one of the jaws and provided with a drill socket carrying arm slidably mounted and adapted to project across the work clamped between the jaws, means for moving said carriage longitudinally of the jaws, and means for moving said arm to any desired degree of projection over the work transversely of the carriage movement, and graduated scale means extending along the jaw upon which the carriage is mounted and extending along the arm mounting reading for both directions of movement arranged for predetermining the location of the drilling center from a fixed stop on the jaw along which the carriage is slidable.

2. In a drilling vise of the character described, a base plate, a pair of cooperating elongated vise jaws carried by said base plate, one of said jaws fixed to said plate and the other mounted thereon to move transversely of the length of the jaws for clamping between them the work to be drilled, means for operating the movable jaws, a carriage mounted on and to slide along the fixed jaw, and the fixed jaw and carriage provided with interengaging guiding surfaces holding the carriage to the jaw, and the carriage provided with a drill socket carrying arm adapted to project across the work clamped between the jaws, screw means arranged for moving said carriage longitudinally of the fixed jaw, and screw means arranged for moving said arm to any desired degree of projection over the work transversely of the carriage movement.

3. In a drilling vise of the character described, a pair of cooperating relatively movable elongated jaws for clamping between them the work to be drilled, a carriage mounted on and to slide along one of the jaws and provided with a drill socket carrying arm adapted to project across the Work clamped between the jaws, means for moving said carriage longitudinally of the jaws, and means for moving said arm to any desired degree of projection over the work transversely of the carriage movement, stop means on one of the jaws against which the work is adapted to be abutted, and graduated scale means reading along both directions of movement arranged for predetermining the location of the drilling center from said stop means.

carried by the projecting end of the arm, a bracket,

formed for clamping to 'the'fixed wall, and a drill socket arm adjustably secured to said bracket for extending over said work. 5. In a drilling vise of the character described, a fiat base plate, a fixed standing wall along one edge of the plate forming a front jaw, a cooperating rear jaw in confronting relation to said front jaw slidably mounted on said plate, means for clamping the jaws against a piece of work to be drilled, a carriage slidably mountedto move along the fixed wall, an armcarried by said Car-7 riage and slidably mounted thereon to project one end to any desired degree over the work clamped between thejaws, and a drill socket carried by the projecting end of the am, said drill socket com; prising a drill guiding bushing projecting into a hole in the arm, and said arm being split adjacent said hole to make it compressible, and means for compressing the arm to tightly engage said bushing.

6. In a drilling vise of the character described, a flat base plate, a fixed standing wall along one edge of the plate forming a front jaw, a cooperating rear jaw in confronting relation to said front ja'w slidably mounted on said plate, means for clampinlg the jaws against a piece of work to be drilled, a carriage slidably mounted to move along the fixed wall, an arm carried by said carriage and slidably mounted thereon to project one end to any desired degree over the work clamped between the jaws, and a drill guiding bushing carried by the projecting end of the arm, and a plurality of bushing receiving pockets formed in the structure of the drilling vise.

7. In a drilling vise of the character described, a flat base plate, a fixed standing wall along one edge of the plate forming a front jaw, a cooperating rear jaw in confronting relation to said front jaw slidably mounted on said plate, means for clamping the jaws against a piece of work to be drilled, a carriage slidably mounted to move along the fixed wall, an arm carried by said carriage and slidably mounted thereon to project one end to any desired degree over the work clamped between the jaws, and a drill guiding bushing carried by the projecting end of the arm, and a plurality of bushing receivingpockets formed in the structure of the drilling vise, and also a larger pocket to receive wrenches required for said vise.

8. In a drilling vise of the character described, a flat base plate, a fixed standing wall along one edge of the plate forming a front jaw, a cooperating rear jaw in confronting relation to said front jaw slidably mounted on said plate, means for clamping the jaws against a piece of work to be drilled, a carriage slidably mounted to move along the fixed wall, an arm carried by said carriage and slidably mounted thereon to project one end to anydesired degree over the work clamped between the jaws, and a drill socket carried by the projecting end of the arm, said rear jaw beingdetachable from said base plate, a pivot hole formed in said plate and a rotary work holder arranged to beipwoted over sai'dfpivo't hole in a manner to permit the work to be rotated'beneath said arm.

"9. In a structure as set out in claim 8, said rotary work holder comprising a disk with a. cir- 'cul'ar raduated scale :along its edge reading against a pointer on said basejplate,a plura1ity of standing jaws on said disk, means mounting said jaws for radial 'movementto grip "the work between them, means for supporting the work at various definite spacedpo'ints of elevationibetwe'en thefjaws, and me'a'ns'for clamping the disk against rotation. v

10. Ina drilling vise oflth'e character described, a flat base plate, a fixed standing wan forming a frontfjaw along one edge o'f'the plate, a relatively movable wall forming a cooperating rear jaw adapted'for ol'ampingthe'work against the front jaw, rack teeth secured "to the base plate, means carried by theirearjaws for engaging anddisengaging the rack teeth comprising a circular plug revolva'bly mounted in the rear "jaw and having teeth formed on a portion of its diameter to engage the 'ra'ck'teeth when the vlug is revolved a fractional turn, and a cut-away portion to clear the rack teeth "at another point of revolution, means on saidiplu'g adapted rorvmanually turning the plug, and .a pressure "screw passing longitudin'allythrongh'the plug in a manner 'toibear against-a portion offzsaid .re'arjjaw for forlcing'the .j aw towardthework when the plug te th'and rack teeth are engaged.

11. "In 'adrillin'g vise of the character described, a fiat base plate, a fixed standing wall 'forrning a "front jaw along one edge of the tpla'te; a relativl'y movable wall forming a cooperating rear jaw adapted for clamping the work against the front vjaw, rack teeth secured to the base plate, and means carried by and movable back and forth as a'un'it'w'ith the rear jaw arranged for engaging and disengaging sa'id rack "teeth "for lookin the rear jaw at various points of advancement toward the front jaw, and screw means arranged for 'givingfinal pressure movement to said rear j'a'w'for so clamping the work, and means carried by the rear jaw 'for engaging therack teeth comprising a circular plug revolvably mounted in the rear jaw and having teeth formed on aiportion of its diameter to engage the rack teeth when the plug is revolved a fractional turn, and a cut-away portion to clear the rack teeth at another point of revolution, and means on saidplugadapted "'for manually turning the plug.

J CHIN F.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2456183 *Jun 18, 1945Dec 14, 1948Green Charles PDevice for clamping and locking work in jigs or fixtures
US2467396 *Jan 15, 1946Apr 19, 1949Luisi LuigiUniversal drill jig
US2471940 *Jul 8, 1946May 31, 1949Exsior DionAll-purpose work holder for drills and the like
US2507288 *Mar 31, 1947May 9, 1950Richard WagnerStraight beam adjustable jaw type vise
US2535581 *Aug 2, 1946Dec 26, 1950Klingman DavidAdjustable drilling jig
US5595464 *Apr 4, 1995Jan 21, 1997Daniels, Jr.; Warren H.Crank adapter for a milling machine
US5758558 *Mar 10, 1995Jun 2, 1998Squires; Richard D.Precision measuring apparatus for locating workpieces for work operations
Classifications
U.S. Classification408/91, 269/71, 408/103, 408/97
International ClassificationB23B47/28
Cooperative ClassificationB23B47/28
European ClassificationB23B47/28