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Publication numberUS2408088 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1946
Filing dateFeb 8, 1944
Priority dateFeb 8, 1944
Publication numberUS 2408088 A, US 2408088A, US-A-2408088, US2408088 A, US2408088A
InventorsMiller Joshua, Bergie L Kauffman
Original AssigneeMiller Joshua, Bergie L Kauffman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Parachute harness
US 2408088 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

* Sept. 24,- 1946. I J. MILLER ETAL I IMPROVEMENT IN PARACHUTE HARNESS Filed Feb. 8, 1 944 .2 Sheefs-Sheet 1 Sept; 24,1946. I LER 2,408,088

IMPROVEMENT IN PARACHU'I'E HARNESS" Filed Feb. 8, 1944 ZSheets-jShet 2 Patented Sept. 24, 1946 r if UNITED,

PARACHUTE HARNESS Joshua Miller, Drexel Park, Pa and Bergie L.

. Kaufiman, Collingswood, N. J.

' Application February 8,1944, Serial No. 521,526

6 Claims. (01.24%151) (Granted under the act of March 3, 1883, as

The wearing of parachutes by personnel aboard aircraft is usually attended by. considerable discomfort except when such personnel are actually seated in their proper places. Ordinarily, the parachute is afiixed to the harness, and it must be put on before entering the aircraft. In the case of the seat type pack this is particularly discomforting since the pack is heavy and strikes against the legs of the wearer while he i walking. Within the close confines of the aircraft itself it is even more discomforting since its weight and bulk hamper the movement of the wearer while he is entering or movin about. For these reasons it is desirable that the parachute and pack be stored in the seat of the aircraft, while a separate 1181131688 be worn by the personnel. Since the harness is light in weight and not bulky the wearing of it is much less objectionable than the wearing of the harness and parachute pack together.

-' Devices of this nature are not new, the Switlik Patent No. 1,964,864 showing a detachable pack of both the seat and back types. The Irvin Patent- 2,016,236 shows "a pack which when worn, is on the front of the wearer, and is quickly attach able and detachable. The instant invention is concerned with the seat pack type of parachutes.

It is the primary purpose of our invention to provide an improved parachute harness and pack of the type wherein the pack can be quickly attached and detached from the harness. I

It is another object ofour invention to provide an improved combination parachute pack and harness wherein the pack is of the seat type and includes a seat pad or life raft case, and wherein the pack is quickly attachable and detachable from the harness by'releasable connections at the back amended April 30,1928; 370 0. G. 757) Fig. 2 is a View similar to Fig. l, but from another angle to show the back details, and showing a person in the harness. A back pad is also shown in this view.

Fig. 3 shows a person wearing the harness completely detached from the pack; and

Fig. 4 shows a buckle particularly suitable for use with a parachute harness.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the parachute pack I2, which is of the seat type, has a rip cord housing I3 extending from the pack to house the rip cord, which terminates in a rip cord handle I4. A belt I5 is attached at its mid portion to the top of the pack I2. Loops I6a and Na on the ends of belt I5, which are adjustable in length by means of buckles I61) and I'll), pass through snap hooks i 6 and. I1. Adjacent the same end of the belt as the snap hook I1 is a rip cord pocket or loop I8 which holds the rip cord handle I4 tightly so that it will always be in place, but not so tightly as to interfere with its use when needed. The housing I3 is fastened to belt I5 at one or more places by suitable wire or similar fastenings 35.

A seat pad or life raft case or the like I9 is attached to the top of the parachute pack I2 by any suitable means such as breakable cords 36. Thus the mid-section of belt I5 lies between the pad and the pack, although it is fastened only. to the pack.

Attached to the parachute which is in the pack are a pair of short lift webs 20 and 2| each terminating in a loop. Engaged in the loops are a pair of metal loops 22 and 23 having diametrical cross-pieces 24 and 25. A connecting web or strap 26 is connected at'its ends to the lift webs 20 and of the wearer and by. other connections at the front of the wearer.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a seat pack type parachute wherein the pack includes a seat cushion or an inflatable life raft etc. wherein the seat cushion can be discard- 7 metal loops and lift webs 20 and 2| in place dured during descent, or the life raft can be removed 2| below the metal loops 22 and 23, and keeps the webs 20 and 2I from separating by an amount greater than the length of strap 26 when the parachute has opened. The metal loops 22 and 23 are connected by their cross-pieces 24 and 25 to the top corner of the seat pad or raft case I9 by means of frangible cord 21 which holds the ing normal handling, but which will be torn by the shock of the opening parachute.

The equipment described above completes the pack which may be left on the seat of the airplane and detached from the harness II when the pilot or other wearer wants to move about the aircraft unencumbered, or when the plane is on the ground.

As best shown in Figs. 1 and 3 a pair of lift webs 28 and 29. which extend upwards along the back of the wearer, form the ends of a main web 30 which passes over the shoulders, down the front of, and under the seat of the wearer, the portion under the seat being the mid-portion of the entire web 30 which terminates in the lift webs 28 and 29. The entire web 30 may be, and is shown as being of double strength in that it is formed of two identical webs stitched together at their side edges. At four points, 3!, 32, 33 and 34, the edges of the two webs are not stitched together, thereby forming loops or passageways for other webs to be described.

Lift webs 28 and 29 are doubled back and stitched at their ends to provide loops which pass through the eyes of snap connectors or hooks 37 and 38, and thereby attach these connectors to the lift webs. Since these hooks are detached frequently it is desirable that they be constructed as shown in the enlarged view of Fig. 4. As shown there, the movable element or lip '39 which is spring pressed against the hook 40, has a wide fiat portion projecting sideways on each side of the hook, so that it can be easily depressed in order to release the hooks 37 and 38 from the metal loops 22 and 23. It is also advantageous that the hooks l and I1 and the harness hooks 4|, 42 and d3 also be of this type, for the same reason.

Beside the main web 35, which supports the weight of the wearer when descending by means of the parachute, auxiliary webs are provided to prevent the wearer from falling out of the main web, particularly during the shock when the parachute opens. As shown clearly in Fig. 1, leg straps 44 and 45, having a hook 4i and a metal loop 55 respectively at their ends, are wound around and stitched to the main web 39 at 46 and 41, then continuing, they form loops 48 and 49. Loops l8 and 48 pass through metal loop 5! and hook 42 respectively, and then pass through passageways 3i and 34 in the main web 30. From here they pass around the right and left side respectively of the wearer, and cross over behind his back. Thence they pass over his shoulders and through buckles 5i and 52 respectively. Web 44 then passes through the long eye of snap hook 43 and through the passageway 33 web 38, and the mating part of web 45 passes through the eye of metal loop and on through the passageway 32 in main web 36. Web 44 then passes through both eyes of buckle 5 1, and around the back of the wearer, terminating in a loop 56 which passes through. the rear eye of buckle 55. In a similar manner, web '45 passes through both eyes of buckle 55, thence around the back of the wearer, and terminates in a loop 52' which passes through the rear eye of buckle 54. The distance between the buckles 54 and can be changed to adjust and fit the harness to the wearer. The webs 44 and 45, where they pass behind the wearer in this manner, provide an additional support preventing the wearer from falling out of the harness. Buckles similar to lfib and I'll) may be used on the leg straps between the stitched portions 46 and 41 and the hook 4| and metal loop 50 to adjust the length of these portions in the same manner that the length of belt 15 is adjusted by buckles I51) and llb.

The harness shown in Fig. 3 is fastened to the wearer by snapping hooks 4|, 42 and 43 onto the hooks 31 and 38 to the metal loops 22 and 23. Figs. 1 and 2 show these hooks fastened. Next he pulls the ends of belt l5 up and in front of him, and slips hook l6 over the eye of metal loop 53. Hook I1 is slipped into the small eye 43a of hook 43. This completes the attachment of the parachute pack to the harness, and it is ready for instant use. If buckle 43 is not provided with the small eye 43a the hook I! may be inserted into the metal loop 53 along with the hook IS. The use of the small eye 43a i advantageous in that when using it the entire harness and pack may be removed by the wearer merely by unhooking the three buckles 4!, 42, and 43. Otherwise, buckle I! must also be removed from loop 53. The elimination of the fourth connection by the use of eye 43a is a great advantage when the wearer is attempting to shed the equipment hurriedly, as when he has landed on the ground and is being dragged by the wind filling the parachute.

In a modified form, instead of using hooks on both ends of belt l5, a metal loop similar to loops 56 and 5| may be substituted for the hook 16. In this case the belt t5 will be a little shorter than as shown in Fig. 1, since the ends will not be hooked into the metal loop 53. Instead, the ends of the belt will be passed up and over the legs of the wearer, and hook I! will be engaged withthe metal loop which takes the place of hook 16.

It is to be understood that the relative positions of the snap hooks such as 31 and 38, may be reversed with respect to the metal loops 22 and 23, and the same reversal is permissible with any of the other combinations of hook and loop. For example, metal loops 22 and 23 may be attached to the bottoms of lift webs 28 and 29 in place of the hooks 31 and 38, which will then be attached instead to the lift webs 20 and 2|.

As shown in Figs. 2 and 3, a pack 58 is fastened to the back of the harness, between the harness and the wearer. The pack 58 may consist merely of a back cushion, or it may contain articles of equipment, such as blankets etc. which are folded so as to make a cushion for the back of the wearer. Since the pack 58 is meant to be worn optionally, it is fastened to the harness by flexible loops 59-63, etc. which are stitched to "the pack at one end. Their free ends pass over the webs of the harness as shown and then are fastened again to the pack by snap fasteners 64 etc. The pack 58 can thus be quickly attached or detached to the harness, preferably while the harness is off. If the wearer jumps with the parachute, the loops 5963 do not interefere with its functioning, since the lift webs 28 and 29 will merely unsnap the fasteners 64, as the webs are pulled upwards by the opening parachute.

After the parachute has opened, and before the. wearer has landed, he may wish to discard the seat pack if he sees he will fall on dry land, or

' he may wish to inflate the life raft if he will land on water and case I 9 contains a life raft. He can instantly discard the seat pack by unfastening hooks l6 and I! from loop 53 and/or eye 43a. If it contains a life raft he can unhook either hook 16 or I! and bring the pack up in his lap while he removes the inflatable raft from the pack. After removing the raft he can discard the pack by unhooking the other remaining hook. If a loop is substituted for hook l6, and belt I 5 passes over the legs of the wearer as described before, only hook I! need be disengaged in order .to discard the pack.

The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by or for the Government of the United States of America for governmental purposes without the payment of any royalties thereon or therefor.

We claim; V 1. Parachute equipment comprising a seat type parachute and a harness therefor; the harness comprising a main web passing under the seat of a the wearer, thence up his front, over the shoulders, and terminating in a first pair of lift webs passing down the back and ending adjacent the seat of the wearer; a pack containing the parachute, the parachute being confined within the pack and having a second pair of lift webs protruding therefrom at the back and spaced substantially the width of the pack; frangible means attaching said second pair of lift webs to said. pack and in proper spaced relationship; separable connecting means between said first and second pairs of lift webs at the ends thereof, said separable means being thesole connection between said parachute pack and harness; a belt fastened substantially at its mid pointto the pack, the ends of the belt extending sideways and adapted to pass around the sides and over the tops of the legs of the wearer; means whereby the ends of said belt can .be separably fastened together in front of the wearer; and a rip cord of said belt can be separably fastened together for said parachute, said rip cord being housed in a housing which is fastened to one of the ends of said belt, the rip cord handle being in front ofthe wearer when the ends of said belt are fastened together.

2. Parachute equipment comprising a harness and a seat type parachute pack, the harness comprising a main web having lift webs passing backward over each shoulder of the wearer and thence substantially vertically downward and terminating adjacent the pack; the parachute within the pack having a pair of lift webs terminating outside the pack and adjacent said first mentioned lift webs; separable means operable to attach each of said first mentioned lift webs to one of said second mentioned webs, said separable means being the sole connection between said parachute pack and harness; a belt secured substantially at its mid point to the said pack, the ends thereof adapted to pass around the sides and over the tops of the legs of the wearer, there being means to fasten the said ends of the belt together in front of the wearer.

3. The apparatus described in claim 2 wherein a seat pad or raft casing is secured to the pack, said casing being readily accessible to the wearer after the parachute within the pack has been deployed, whereby the wearer can remove the life raft from the casing and discard the pack and casing before landing, by separating the connection between the ends of said belt.

4. Parachute equipment comprising a seat type parachute and a harness therefor; the harness comprising a main web passing under the seat of the wearer, thence up his front, over the shoulders, and terminating in a first pair of lift webs passing down the back and ending adjacent the seat of the wearer; a pack containing the parachute, the parachute being confined within the pack and having a second pair of lift webs protruding therefrom at the back and spaced substantially the width of the pack; frangible means attaching said second pair of lift webs to said in front of the wearer.

5. Parachute equipment comprising a seat type parachute and a harness therefor; the harness comprising a main web passing under the seat of the wearer, thence up his front, over the shoulders, and terminating in a first pair of lift webs passing down'the back and ending adjacent the seat of the wearer; .a pack containing the parachute, the parachute being confined within the pack and having a second pair of lift webs protruding therefrom at the back and spaced substantially the width of the pack;

frangible means attaching said second pair of lift webs to said pack and in proper spaced relationship; and separable connecting means between said first and second pairs of liftwebs at the ends thereof, said separable means being the sole connection between said parachute pack and harness, said pack being provided with a belt fastened substantially at its midpoint to the pack, the ends of the belt extending sideways and adapted to pass around the sides of the legs of the wearerjauxiliary webs provided with sepa- .rable fasteners carried by said main web to assist in retaining the front portions of said main web in position, and separable fasteners on the ends of said belt whereby each end can be connected to said auxiliary webs. v

6. Parachute equipment comprising a seat type parachute and a harness therefor; said harness comprising a main web to pass under the seat of the wearer, thence up his front, over his shoulders, and terminating in a first pair of lift webs passing down the back and ending adjacent the seat of the wearer; a pack containing the parachute, said parachute being confined within the pack and having a second pair of lift webs protruding therefrom at the back and spaced substantially the width of the pack; frangible means attaching said second pair of lift webs to said pack and in proper spaced relationship; and separable connecting means between said first and second pairs of lift webs at the ends thereof, said separable means being the sole connection between said parachute pack and harness; said pack being provided with a belt fastened substantially at its mid point to the pack, the end of said belt extending sideways and adapted to pass around the sides of the legs of the wearer; said main web being provided with auxiliary webs connecting the front portions of said web by means of separable fasteners, the ends of said belt being provided with means whereby they can each be separably connected to one of said auxiliary webs; said separable fasteners each having a portion engageable by the said means on the ends of said belt.

JOSHUA MILLER. BERGIE L. KAUFFMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4720064 *Apr 7, 1987Jan 19, 1988The Boeing CompanyEjection seat restraint/parachute harness
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/151.00R
International ClassificationB64D17/00, B64D17/22
Cooperative ClassificationB64D17/30, B64D2700/625
European ClassificationB64D17/30