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Publication numberUS2408880 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 8, 1946
Filing dateApr 28, 1943
Priority dateApr 28, 1943
Publication numberUS 2408880 A, US 2408880A, US-A-2408880, US2408880 A, US2408880A
InventorsRebers Paul A
Original AssigneeRebers Paul A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Artificial hand
US 2408880 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 8, 16.

P. A. REBERS v 2,408,880

ARTIFICIAL HAND Filed April 28, 1943 2 Sheets-Shet l /C/ci/ 39 /IvvEN-To H404 A/QEBEES y fym ATTORNEYS www P. A. REBERS ARTIFICIAL HAND 'f s, i946.

Filed April 28, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I /A/vE/vorzeV Bqz/L [4.1655565 @$4 Patented Oct. 8, 1946 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 5 Claims.

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in artiiicial limbs and more particularly to artificial hands.

An object of the present invention is to provide an artificial hand having means for operatively attaching it to the stump of the forearm and to the upper arm in such a manner that the operation of the lingers of the hand may be accurately and conveniently controlled by a slight movement of the arm.

A further object is to provide an artificial hand comprising a fixed finger member, and a relatively movable nger member having means for operating it to move it towards or away from the fixed nger, as when picking up articles or releasing them, and means being provided whereby the plane of the xed and movable fingers may be rotatively adjusted with respect to the supporting member of the apparatus by a simple movement of the operators arm, whereby the fingers may readily and conveniently be posi-` tioned to pick up various articles without the necessity of the wearer using his other or good hand, as is common with various devices of this general type now in use.

A further and more specific object is to provide an articial hand comprising a U-shaped supporting member having a bearing at its lower end for rotatively receiving a shaft having a sleeve secured to one end thereof adapted to receive and be secured to the stump of the forearm, said supporting member having strap-like bars or legs disposed at opposite sides of the forearm, and having sections pivoted to the upper ends thereof in alignment with the elbow, said upper ends having means for securing them to the upper arm thereby to operatively secure the device to the wearers arm, and a finger member being mounted for rotary adjustment on said bearing,

and having a relatively movable linger member pivoted thereto, and means being provided whereby the rotary adjustment of said fingers with respect to the sup-porting member may be accomplished by a combined movement of the wearers forearm and shoulder.

Other objects of the invention reside in the simple and inexpensive construction of the device, as a whole, whereby it may be manufactured in quantity production at small cost; in the provision of an artificial hand having means for readily and conveniently mounting it upon the arm of the wearer, and whereby the coacting ngers of the device may be conveniently manipulated to pick up or release various articles by rotary movement of the forearm with respect to the supporting means; and in the unique mounting of the co-acting fingers upon the supporting member, whereby said ngers may be readily rotatively adjusted with respect to the supporting member by a movement of the arm, thereby to facilitate positioning the fingers with respect to an article or to the work to be accomplished.

Other objects of the invention will appear from the following description and accompanying drawings and will be pointed out in the annexed claims.

In the accompanying drawings there has been disclosed a structure designed to carry out the various objects of the invention, but it is to be understood that the invention is not confined to the exact features shown as various changes may be made within the scope of the claims which follow.

In the drawings;

Figure 1 is a front View of the device showing it mounted on an arm;

Figure 2 is an enlarged detail View showing the unique mounting of the nger members upon the lower end of the support;

Figure 3 is a view showing the forearm receiving sleeve rotated in a direction to open or separate the lingers;

Figure 4 is a detail sectional view on a relatively larger scale, to more clearly illustrate the mounting for the fingers upon the lower end of the supporting member;

Figure 5 is a side view of Figure l; Figure 6 is an enlarged detail sectional View showing the cam actuated to open or separate wardly along the inner and outer sides of the forearm 5, and have upper sections 8 pivotally connected thereto by pivots l, as best shownin Figures 1 and 5. The axes of the pivots 'l are aligned with the elbow joint, as clearly illustrated in Figures l and 5 to permit free bending of the elbow. The upper sections 6 5 are adapted to be secured to the upper arm 8 by a suitable jacket 9 to which they may be secured by such means as rivets ill. The jacket B is adapted to encircle the arm, and has straps Il for strapping it to 3 the wearers arm, as is more or less common in the art.

To prevent the jacket 9 from sliding down on the wearers arm, a suitable harness, generally designated by the numeral I2, is provided. This harness has a strap I3 connecting it to the inner section 6 of the supporting member. The opposite side of the harness I2 is shown having a strap I4 engaging the opposite arm I5 of the wearer whereby the harness is supported on the shoulders in such a manner that the strap i3 connecting the harness to the upper inner section 6 of `the supporting member 2 will always retain the jacket 9 in proper position upon the upper arm of the wearer.

The connecting portion 3 of the supporting member 2 is preferably formed with an enlarged central portion`3 as shown in Figure 7 An opening I is provided in the enlarged central portion 3 adapted to receive the reduced portion I6 of a bearing member Il, and whereby the bearing may be lixedly secured in the opening I5 of the connecting portion 3 of the supporting member 2, as will be understood by reference to Figure 4.

A short shaft I8 is rotatably received in the bearing Il and is shown provided at its upper end with a flange I9 to which a U-shaped member ZI is secured by such means as a screw 22. The U-shaped member 2| provides a support for a sleeve 23 adapted to receive the stump 24 of the forearm 5, as clearly illustrated in Figures l and 4. The wall of the sleeve 23 has an elongated opening provided with suitable lacings 25, whereby the sleeve may be snugly fitted `to the stump, as will readily be understood by reference to Figures l and 5.

A plate 26, preferably circular in conguration, is rotatably mounted on the enlarged portion 2 of the bearing l, and is retained thereon by a lock nut 28 and washer 29. A suitable spacing Washer 3l may be interposed between the enlarged central portion 3 of the supporting member 2 and the plate 26, as best shown in Figure 4.

The plate 26 is provided with a series of peripheral notches 32 adapted to receive One end of a dog shown pivoted at 34 to a suitable stud 35 which may be suitably secured to the connecting portion 3 of the supporting member 2, as shown in Figures 4 and 7. The dog 33 has a spring 36, as shown in Figure 2, for constantly urging it into engagement with one of the notches 32 in the plate 26.

A linger member 36 has one end xedly secured to the plate 26 and is provided with a gripping head or claw 31 adapted to cO-act with a similarly shaped head or claw 38 provided on a relatively movable finger member 39. The movable iinger member 39 is pivoted to the fixed finger 35 by a pivot 4I. Because of the fixed linger 36 being carried directly by the rotatively adjustable plate 26, the iixed finger may be relatively rotated about the axis of the shaft I8 without imparting rotation to said shaft.

A cam plate 42 is xedly secured to the lower end of. the shaft I8 by suitable lock nutsv 43 and 44. The cam plate 42 has an arcuately formed cam slot 45 therein adapted to receive an antifriction roller l5 provided on the upper or short end 4'! of the iinger 39. The cam slot 45 is so shaped with respect to the swinging movement of the roller 46 that the roller will substantially follow the cam, when the cam is relatively rotated by rotation of the shaft I8, as when the forearm 5 is relatively rotated with respect to the supporting member 2. The cam plate 42 is adjustably 4 secured to the threaded end portion 5I of the shaft IB by the lock nuts 43 and 44. By reference to Figure 4 it will be noted that the circular plate 26 to which the ixed finger 36 is secured, is normally locked against rotary movement as a result of the dog 33 being engaged with one of the peripheral notches 32 in the plate 26.

By reference to Figures 3 and 4, it will be noted that the pivoted finger 39 may be readily and conveniently oscillated with respect to the lixed member 36 by rotation of the cam 42, as when the shaft I8 is rotated by rotary movement of the forearm. When the forearm is rotated in one direction, or from the position shown in Figure 4 to that shown in Figure 3, the lingers 36 and 39 will separate or open up, as shown in Figure 3, whereby they may grip an article. Rotation of the forearm in the opposite direction will move the head or claw 38 of the movable linger 39 into engagement with the head or claw 3l of the fixed finger 36. Thus, it will be seen that the operation of the pivoted finger 39 may be accurately and conveniently controlled by a slight rotary movement of the stump 24 of the wearers forearm 5.

Another important feature of the invention resides in the means provided for relatively changing the plane of the co-acti'ng lingers 36 and 39 with respect to the supporting member 2, thereby to facilitate positioning the finger claws or terminals 31 and 38 with respect to an object to be picked up, or to the work to be performed by .the lingers.

To thus rotatively adjust the angular position of the lingers with respect to the supporting member 2, a cord 53 is shown having one end secured to the dog 33 and passes thru guide loops or eyes 54 and 55 provided respectively on ythe outer leg 4 of the supporting member 2 and its upper pivoted section 6, as clearly illustrated in Figures l and 5. From the guide 55 the cord 53 passes around back of the Lipper arm 8, and is secured at 56 to one end of a strap 51 of the harness I2. The strap 51 may pass over one of the wearers shoulders, as clearly illustrated in Figure 1.

The cord 53 is so arranged that when the wearer slightly moves his forearm 5 with respect to his upper arm 8, a pull is exerted on the cord 53 which moves the dog 33 out of locking engagement with the notch plate 26, whereby said plate may be freely rotatably adjusted about the axis of the shaft I8, as will readily be understood by reference to Figures 4 and 6.

In the operation of the novel apparatus herein disclosed, the operation of the finger members 36 and 39 is accomplished entirely by rotary movement of the stump 24 of the forearm. Should the terminal gripping heads or claws 31 and 38 of the fingers 36 and 39, respectively, not be properly positioned with respect to the article to be picked up, or to the work to be performed, the operator may quickly rotate the finger members about the axis of the shaft I8 by a slight combined movement of the forearm and shoulder.

To thus relatively rotate the fingers 36 and 33 Y with respect to the supporting member 2, a slight to the proper angle with respect to the work, the wearer manipulates his arm and/or shoulder in such a manner as to permit the dog again to engage one of the notches 32 in the plate 26, whereby the fingers will be locked against rotary movement with respect to the supporting member 2, as will be understood.

It will thus be noted that the operation of the fingers 36 and 39 is under complete control of the operators arm at all times, which renders the artificial hand more useful and practical than structures of this general type now in common use.

It will also be noted that the entire apparatus is very simple and inexpensive in construction whereby it may be manufactured in quantity production at small cost which is a highly desirable feature in devices of this general type.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that I. have accomplished at least the principal objects of my invention, and it will also be apparent to those skilled in the art that the embodiments herein described may be variously changed and modified, without departing from the spirit of the invention, and that the invention is capable of uses and has advantages not herein specifically described; hence it will be appreciated that the herein disclosed embodiments are' illustrative only, and that my invention is not limited thereto.

I claim as my invention:

l. In an artificial hand, a supporting member adapted to be secured to an arm above the elbow, a shaft rotatably mounted in the lower end of the support, a sleeve secured to one end of the shaft adapted to receive the stump of the forearm, a notched plate mounted for rotary adjustment about the axis of said shaft, a springactuated dog engageable with the notched plate for locking it in adjusted position on the supporting member, a finger member fixed to the plate, a second finger member mounted for pivotal movement on the fixed finger, means for actuating said movable finger upon rotation of said shaft, and a harness supported on the shoulders of the wearer and having an operative connection with said dog whereby the dog may be moved out of locking engagement with the notched plate by movement of the arm and shoulder, thereby to permit the fingers to be rotatively adjusted with respect to the shaft to facilitate positioning the fingers with respect to the article or work to be performed, by rotation of the forearm relative to the support.

2. In a device of the class described, a U shaped supporting member comprising upper and lower portions pivotally connected together at the elbow of the arm, the upper portion having means for securing it to the upper arm and the lower portion having a bearing secured thereto, a sleeve adapted to receive the stump of the forearm, a shaft secured at one end of said sleeve, said shaft being rotatably mounted in said bearing, a cam secured to the opposite end of the shaft for direct rotation with the shaft, a notched plate mounted for rotary adjustment on said bearing and with respect to said supporting member, a dog mounted on the supporting member and engageable with the notches in said plate to lock the plate in adjusted position on the supporting member, a finger member fixed to thev notched plate, a second finger member pivoted to the fixed finger and having one end operatively engaged be actuated by combined movement of the forearm and shoulder` to release the plate whereby the plane of the fingers may be rotatively adjusted with respect to the supporting member by means of a rotary movement of the forearm to facilitate positioning the fingers with respect to the article to be picked up or the work to be pern formed.

3. In an artificial hand, a supporting member adapted to be secured to an arm above the elbow, a shaft rotatably mounted in the lower end of the support, a sleeve secured to one end of said shaft adapted to receive the stump of the forearm, a cam secured to the opposite end of said shaft for direct rotation therewith, a notched plate mounted for rotary adjustment with respect to said 'supporting member about the axis of said shaft, a dog mounted on the supporting member and engageable with the notches in said plate to lock the plate in a plurality of adjusted positions on the supporting member, a fixed finger member carried by said plate, a movable finger member pivoted to said fixed finger and carried thereby, said movable nger member having one end operatively engaged with said cam so as to be moved thereby on rotation of said shaft and sleeve, and means for actuating said dog by a combined movement of the forearm and shoulder to release said plate and permit rotary adjustment of said plate through forces applied by a rotary movement of the forearm through said finger members to said plate.

4. In an artificial hand, a supporting member adapted to be secured to an arm above the elbow, a shaft rotatably mounted in the lower end of the support, a sleeve secured to one end of said shaft adapted to receive the stump of the forearm, a cam secured to the opposite end of said shaft for direct rotation therewith, a notched plate mounted for rotary adjustment ywith respect to said supporting member about the axis of said shaft, a dog mounted on the supporting member and engageable with the notches in said plate to lock the plate in a plurality of adjusted positions on the supporting member, a pair of finger members carried by said plate and mounted for relative pivotal movement, one of said finger members being operatively engaged with said cam so as to be moved thereby on rotation of said shaft and sleeve, and means extending from said dog to a relatively fixed point on the wearers shoulder for actuating said dog by a combined movement of the forearm. and shoulder to release said plate and permit rotary adjustment of said plate through forces applied by a rotary movement of the forearm through and finger members to 'said plate.

5. The artificial hand of claim 3 further characterized in that said forces for rotatively adjusting the notched plate are transmitted from the forearm through the sleeve to the shaft and cam carried thereby and from said cam through the movable nger to the fixed finger to the plate.

PAUL A. REBERS.

o with said cam and means whereby Said dog may

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2457316 *Nov 18, 1946Dec 28, 1948Northrop Aircraft IncProsthetic wrist
US2638604 *Jul 14, 1951May 19, 1953Northrop Aircraft IncArtificial arm with stepped-up wrist drive and automatic wrist lock
US2669727 *Jul 24, 1951Feb 23, 1954Opuszenski TheodoreArtificial hand
US4844306 *Oct 2, 1987Jul 4, 1989Spacelabs, Inc.Blood pressure cuff harness
US5021065 *Apr 12, 1990Jun 4, 1991The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator, National Aeronautics And Space AdministrationRotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand
US8449624Feb 16, 2010May 28, 2013Deka Products Limited PartnershipArm prosthetic device
US8453340Feb 16, 2010Jun 4, 2013Deka Products Limited PartnershipSystem, method and apparatus for orientation control
US8821587Feb 6, 2008Sep 2, 2014Deka Products Limited PartnershipApparatus for control of a prosthetic
US8864845Feb 16, 2010Oct 21, 2014DEKA Limited PartnershipSystem for control of a prosthetic device
US8870970Feb 6, 2008Oct 28, 2014Deka Products Limited PartnershipDynamic support apparatus
US8882852Dec 12, 2011Nov 11, 2014Deka Products Limited PartnershipDynamic support apparatus and system
US8956421Apr 15, 2011Feb 17, 2015Deka Products Limited PartnershipDynamic support apparatus and system
US8979943Apr 15, 2011Mar 17, 2015Deka Products Limited PartnershipArm prosthetic device
US9114028Feb 6, 2008Aug 25, 2015Deka Products Limited PartnershipArm prosthetic device
US9114030Apr 15, 2011Aug 25, 2015Deka Products Limited PartnershipSystem for control of a prosthetic device
US20080243265 *Feb 6, 2008Oct 2, 2008Deka Products Limited PartnershipMethod and apparatus for control of a prosthetic
US20080288088 *Feb 6, 2008Nov 20, 2008Deka Products Limited PartnershipArm prosthetic device
US20090271000 *Oct 29, 2009Deka Products Limited PartnershipDynamic support apparatus
US20100211185 *Feb 16, 2010Aug 19, 2010Deka Products Limited PartnershipSystem, method and apparatus for orientation control
US20100268351 *Oct 21, 2010Deka Products Limited PartnershipSystem, method and apparatus for control of a prosthetic device
US20100274365 *Oct 28, 2010Deka Products Limited PartnershipArm prosthetic device
WO2012036770A3 *Jun 22, 2011May 3, 2012Deka Products Limited PartnershipArm prosthetic device
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/63, 623/58
International ClassificationA61F2/58, A61F2/50
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2/588
European ClassificationA61F2/58H6