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Publication numberUS2410922 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1946
Filing dateNov 12, 1941
Priority dateNov 12, 1941
Publication numberUS 2410922 A, US 2410922A, US-A-2410922, US2410922 A, US2410922A
InventorsBalduf Bruno E
Original AssigneeUnited States Gypsum Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Frame member
US 2410922 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

f Nov. 12, 194s. 'B E BAL'UF 2,410,922

FRAME MEMBER Filed Nov. l2, 1941 Y 2 Sheets-Sheet l Nov. 12, 1946. QEBALDUF 2,410,922y

FRAME MEMBER y F'led Nov. l2, 1941 ZVShQetS-Sheel. 2

u il .1f

" f Il', '/a' nated.

Patented Nov. 12, 1946 FRAME MEMBER Bruno Baldui', Chicago, Ill., assignor to United States Gypsum Company,

poration of `Illinois Chicago, Ill., a cor- Appiication November 12, 1941, serial No. 418,747

i o1. '1a-46) 6 Claims.

This invention relates to a hollow-walled building construction and frame members therefor and more particularly to constructions involving the use of sheet metal framemembers such, for instance, as studs, joists, andthe like. For the purposes of this specification, the invention will be described in connection with studs and the like. However, it will be understood that it is equally well adapted for use in connection with any sheet metal frame members to which plasterboard and plaster or similar wall finishes are applied.

Ordinarily plasterboard` lath j or gypsum sheathing of various types in the form of panels are applied directly to the studs'and secured snugly against the anges of the various well known types of sheet metal studs. When constructed in this manner, condensation very rapidly takes place on the studs'and this condensation is conducted vthrough* the wallboards and discolors the outer surface of the wall and any finish which may beapplied thereto.

Y vIt is an object of the present invention to provide a hollow-walled building construction and sheet metal stud therefor wherein the discoloring of the porous wallboards is substantially elimi- A further object is the provision ofsheet metal frame memberswhich will produce the desired results inv supporting a Wall and preventing disfiguration due to condensation and at the same time in which the amount of material required to form the frame members is substantially reduced below the amount commonly required in the production of these elements.

A further object isthe'provision of nailableA course, may be secured to the studs by any of the means commonly used, such, for instance, as clips or wires, or may 'be nailed directly to the studs when these studs are nailable characteristics.

' It is still another object to provide a'new and designed to provide novel corner stud, ypreferably ofthe nailable type and having suitable `flanges and projections thereon, so that all of the inner and outer wallboards converging at the corner may be secured to the stud and suitably spaced therefrom by means of the projections. 1

A further object is the provision of' a corner stud of the character described which will have, the required strength in all directions and will provide nailable` characteristics whereby all of the boards converging at the corner may be nailed thereto if desired. l l

Further objects ,will be apparent from the specication4 and the appended claims.

In the drawings: y y Fig.v 1 is a perspective cross sectionalfview' of a nailable I-beam stud and associated wallboards and illustrates oneembodiment of the invention.` Fig. 2 is a transversev sectional view through the stud shown in Fig. 1 and is taken on a' line substantially corresponding to line 2-2 thereof. Fig. 3 is a sectional perspectiveV View similar to Fig. 1, but illustrates an embodiment in which a channel stud is used instead` of'an I-beam stud. Fig. 4 is a `fragmentary perspectivejview of a portion of the channel stud shown in Fig. V3.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary perspective view of a' slightly modified form of projection which may be used on the studfuflanges to provide a short line contact with a4 wallboard. y

Fig.A 6 is a sectional view of a nailable sheet metal corner' stud and wallboards associated therewithand illustrates another embodiment of the invention.'V I j Figf'l is a diagrammatic end View of one of the corner studs as illustrated in Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional `view through the inwardly extending web-and flanges of `the corner stud shown in Fig. 6 and illustrates ther method ofy securing wallboards and expanded metal corner4 reinforcing members thereto.

Referring to the drawings in detail, the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 comprises a sheet metal stud I formed 'of two sheet metal channels each having a web 2 and outstandingiianges 3. vThese channels are secured together preferably by being slightly deformed and spot-V weldediat spaced points 4 so that the' webs are closely adjacent, but slightly spaced, to enable nails 5 to be driven into' the studs between thev webs Vas illustrated in order to secure suitable wallboards 6 and l thereto. The flanges are formed tol provide longitudinal co-operatingA beads 8 and 9 so that the nails will be deformed in passing between these beads and therefore will tions are spaced along the edge of the flanges a distance considerably less than the width of a single standard plasterboard so that each board applied tothe face of the stud will contact with a plurality of the projections and the boards will thereby be spaced a material distance from the flanges and enable convection currents to flow therebetween.

The projections I are formed integral with the flange andthis is preferably accomplished merely by forming the m'etal at the edge of the flange outwardly sufficiently to provide a substantially point contact with the adjacent board. This constructionprovides several advantages in that discoloration of the wallboards and finish thereon is prevented for the reason that moisture condensing on the flanges is not conducted through the boards. Also a much better insula tion is providedfor the reasonthat, although the sheet metal is a good conductor of heat, the comparatively wide air spaces provided between the studs and the adjacent boards materially assist in preventing heat conduction through the wall. Another important advantage is that a materially less amount of metal is required in the manufacture of the studs. Forinstance, the projections shown do not require any additional metal for their formation and, if these projections provide a s" air space on each side of the stud, then a saving of a strip of metal of the length of the stud and 3A" wide is obtained. All of these advantageous features are secured without increasing the cost of the stud; in fact, the cost is reduced for the reason that the projections in a stud may be formed at a considerably less expense than the cost of the material saved in the construction.

In Fig. 2 the width of the air space between the stud and the wall board is.illustrated by the dotted lines I and the width of the strip ofmetal saved in the manufacture of a stud of the type shown will, of course, be four times the distance between these dotted lines,

Fig. 3 illustrates another embodiment in which a single channel |2 is used and comprises a' web I3 and outstanding flanges 4. The anges |4 have projections |0a formed thereon in the'same manner as the projections |0 previously described. This type of stud is, of course, not nailable, and the boards E and 1 may be applied thereto by any suitable means such, for instance, as clips or wires, either method being well known in the art. In this construction the boards are spaced from the flanges and suitable air spaces jections I6 are slightly rounded to provide a somewhat wider bearing surface, which may be preferable when soft wallboards are used, while the projection shown inFig. 5 provides more nearly a line contact, which may be preferable for some types of boards.

, Figs. 6, 7, and 8 illustrate a wall structure including a corner stud I8. This stud may aptly be called a Y-beam and is preferably formed of a wide web member I9 having a laterally extending web 20 welded thereto as at 2|. This provides a Y-beam in which the arms of the Y are the outwardly extending web portions 22 and 2l at an angle to each other corresponding to the angle of the corner, the apex of the angle being intersected by an inwardly extending web portion 24 which forms the leg of the Y-beam. Nail holding web portions 25 and 26 are welded to the webs 22 rand 23 at spaced points as shown at 21. The welded webs may be deformed adjacent the welding points in order to space the webs slightly and thereby provide nailing slots 28 which slots are substantially identical with the nailing slots previously described. Nails driven into these slots.

are distorted and interlocked with the stud by means of'suitable beads or the like 29.

All of the 'web members 22, 23, 25, and 26 are provided with laterally extending flanges, terminating in angularly Voutturned flanges 3|. The outer wallboards 32 of gypsum sheathing or the like may be applied4 directly to these outturned angular flanges 3| and nailed to the studding in the same manner as previousy described, in which case the boards will rest against the edges of the angular flanges 3| throughout the extent of the boards and an air space 33 will be provided between the body of the stud and the boards and between the adjacent angular flanges 3|. While such a structure is desirable in some constructions, it is preferable to deform the edges of the angular flanges '3| to provide projections Illb against which projections the gypsum sheathing rests, so that the sheathing is out of contact with all portions of the stud except at the points of the projections. This enables a free ilow of convection currents in all directions between the provided therebetween in the same manner as wardly to provide projections in which the peaks of the projections extend transversely of the flanges as shown to thereby provide substantially a line contact with the adjacent board. `'I'he prostud and adjacent boards. Also, if desired, the angular flanges 3| may be omitted and projections similar'to the previously described projections Ill may be formed outwardly from the afnges 30. 1

' A nail holding web portion 34 of substantially the same formations as the web portions 25 and 26 is welded to the inwardly extending web portion 24 in the same manner as previously described. Thetwo inwardly extending web portions 24 and 34 are also provided with the nail holding beads 29 and are arranged to provide a similar nailing slot 28. The inwardlyV extending webs are provided with angular flanges 35 terminatingV in spaced inturned flanges 33, which latter flanges are preferably parallel with the web flanges 24 and 34. These anges 36 are spaced suficiently to receive therebetween the adjacent ends of the inner gypsum boards 21 and 38 forming the corner of a plaster base or the like. The inturned flanges' 36 are also preferably deformed to provide projections |||b such as previously described, which projections are so positioned as to be engaged by the gypsum boards and to space these boards from the flanges as shown at 38. By this' construction, convection currents may freely pass between the gypsum boards and the flanges 36 and discoloration of in preventing plaster cracks.

Fig. 8 illustrates the method of securing expanded metal in the Wall corner and at the same time securing the ends of the boards in place. In this construction anexpanded metal angle 40 which may be of the type commonly known to the trade as Cornerite is nailed into the stud by means of nails 4| in the manner illustrated. By this means, the Cornerite and the gypsum boards 31 and 38 may be snugly secured to the stud. In this construction the stud is preferably provided with the integral projections Illb. However, these projections may be omitted if desired, in which case the boards 31 and 38 will rest directly against the edge of the flanges 36.

It is intended, of course, that the invention should not be limited to the specic embodiment or embodiments disclosed herein, since modifications may be made, and it is contemplated, therefore, by the appended claims to cover any such modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.

Having thus described this invention, what is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A nailable corner stud comprising a Y-beam, the leg and arms of the Y each having deformed co-operating portions for gripping nails therebetween when gypsum boards or the like are nailed thereto, the leg and arms of the Y each terminating in oppositely extended anges to engage said boards.

2. A nailable corner stud comprising a sheet metal Y-beam, the leg and arms of the Y each having deformed co-operating portions for gripping nails therebetween when gypsum boards or the like are nailed thereto, the leg and arms of the Y each terminating in oppositely extended flanges, at least some of said flanges having small board engaging projections formed outwardly so that said boards are spaced from said flanges sufficiently to enable convection currents to pass therebetween in all directions.

3. A nailable corner stud comprising a Y-beam, the leg and arms of the Y each having deformed co-operating portions for gripping nails therebetween when gypsum boards or the like arev nailed thereto, the leg and arms of the Y each terminating in oppositely extended flanges, said flanges having their free edges turned outwardly for substantially line contact with said boards so that an air space is provided between said flanges and said boards.

4. A nailable corner stud comprising a unitary sheet metal Y-beam, the'leg and arms of the Y each having deformed co-operating portions for gripping nails therebetween when gypsum boards or the like are nailed thereto, the leg and arms of the Y each terminating in oppositely extended flanges, said flanges having their free edges turned outwardly, and small spaced projections formed outwardly on said edges for substantially n point contact with said boards so that convection currents may pass in all directions between said boards and said stud.

5. In a building, a hollow-walled corner structure having two opposed spaced porous walls that are adapted to receive a finish, said corner structure comprising a unitary sheet metal Y-beam stud, the arms of said Y each having laterally and oppositely extending flanges that terminate adjacent to their edges in spaced outwardly extending projections of small area, porous wallboards secured to the stud against said projections formed on said arms whereby said wallboards vdene the outside angle of said hollow- Walled corner structure with the apex of the angle'being substantially in alignment with the leg of said Y, 'the outer edge of said leg having laterally and oppositely extending flanges that terminate adjacent to their edges in spaced outwardly extending projectionsof small area, and porous wallboards secured to said stud against said projections formed on said leg whereby said last mentioned wallboardsv define the inside angle of said' hollow-walled corner structure with the apex of said inside angle being substantially in alignment with the leg of said Y.

6. A hollow-walled structure having opposed spaced porous walls, the exposed surfaces of which are adapted to receive a finish, said hollowwalled structure comprising a sheet metal supporting stud having spaced laterally extending longitudinal metal flanges upon which spaced projections of small area extend outwardly therefrom throughout the length of said stud, and porous boards secured against said projections only so that the said porous boards are spaced a material distance from the main body portion of said metal flanges throughout their length whereby moisture that condenses on said sheet metal supporting stud is substantially precluded from being absorbed by said porous boards.

BRUNO E. BALDUF.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/275, 52/347, 52/481.1, 52/356
International ClassificationE04B2/58, E04B2/62
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/62
European ClassificationE04B2/62