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Publication numberUS2411043 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1946
Filing dateNov 24, 1943
Priority dateNov 24, 1943
Publication numberUS 2411043 A, US 2411043A, US-A-2411043, US2411043 A, US2411043A
InventorsEdward J Klassen
Original AssigneeEdward J Klassen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Thermopressure gluing press
US 2411043 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 12, 1946. E. J. KLASSEN THERMO-PRESSURE GLUING PRESS Filed Nov. 24, 1943 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 uh gw 9% \Q Q9 Q m HF ms Eli; m m QM 9% E .i m% m QQ lZWAQD INVENTO ATTORNEY.

Nov. 12, 1946. E. J. KLASSEN 2,411,043

THERMO-PRESSURE GLUING PRESS Filed Nov. 24,- 1943 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 152M420 d'flAssE/v,

INVENTOR.

NOV. 12, 1946. E, KLASSEN 2,411,043

THERMOPRESSURE GLUING PRESS Filed Nov. 24, 1945 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 13g 55 31 i71 4 I 65 6 I "'62 63 a4 I 51 47a 80 3 lull, a2 a? 30 w 103 38 102 5/ ,9 52144420 Z'IKLAsSEN, J r 33 65 OR.

ATTORN EY.

Nov; 12, 1946.

E. J. KLASSEN THERMO PRES SURE GLUING PRES S Filed Nov. 24, 1943 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 $144420 cZ'KZ/Issem INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY.

Patented Nov. 12, 1946 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE THERMOPRESSURE GLUING PRESS Edward J. Klassen, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application November 24, 1943, Serial No. 511,541

8 Claims. 1

This invention relates generally to thermopressure presses for applying heat and pressure to members which are being glued together to expedite setting of the glue.

The present invention may be regarded generally as dealing with improvements and modifications in the subject matter of my prior Patent No. 2,337,250, issued December 21, 1943. The subject matter of said prior patent was disclosed in a specific embodiment designed particularly for the purpose of the simultaneous gluing of plywood skins to the opposite sides of awood construction airfoil. The present invention is illustratively disclosed in a form more particularly designed for the purpose of gluing a plywood surface to one side of a relatively long box-like structure, such as the wing spar of a wood construction airplane or glider. It will be understood, however, that this is for illustrative purposes only, and without implied limitation to the example selected.

The glue used at the present time in wooden aircraft and glider construction is of a phenolic plastic type whose setting time is greatly re duced in the presence of heat, and it is accordingly the practice to apply heat to the exterior surface of the plywood after the latter has been applied to the glue-coated structure to which it is to be secured. As in any gluing operation, it is also desirable to apply pressure, and it is accordingly the combined purpose to apply heat and pressure simultaneously to the members to be glued together.

It has become a common practice in the art to apply pressure over a surface to be glued by means of a pneumatic bag, which, when inflated, exerts a uniform pressure against the surface. The press disclosed in my aforesaid copending application-is of such a type, and the present invention may be regarded generally as involving improvements in apparatus of the character indicated. a

The general object of the invention is accordingly the provision of improvements in apparatus for practicing the rubber bag gluing process.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a press of the general type mentioned, adapted particularly to the handling of relatively long-box-like structures.

Previously known presses of the type in ques- -tion have encountered difi'iculty owing to deterioration of and other difficulties with the pneumatic rubber bag. The present invention utilizes in place of the usual r bb r g a p11 rality of flexible tubes or hoses, of a typical diameter of approximately three inches, and for which purpose I preferably and conveniently employ sections of ordinary fire hose. Such hose is readily procureable, is not subject to relatively rapid deterioration, is relatively simple to install and handle generally, and serves the purpose at least as well, considered functionally, as the more usual, rubber bag. The press of the present invention also involves improvements and modifications designed to suit the press to relatively long box-like structures such as the wingspars of relatively large-sized gliders. These improvements and modifications may, however, best be left for discussion in the course of the following detailed description of a present specific embodiment of the invention, for which purpose reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view showing one end and a portion of the side and top of a press in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the press of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a vertical section on line 3-3 of Fig. 2, the press being shown in closed position;

Fig. 3a is a fragmentary view similar to a portion of Fig. 3 but showing a modification;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary View of a portion of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a section similar to Fig. 3, but showing the press in open or elevated condition;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged detail taken from Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary plan view of the press with parts broken away;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary end elevation of the press looking at the opposite end of the press from that shown in Fig. 1; I

Fig. 9 is a plan view of a modified form of press; and

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on line Ill-l0 of Fig. 9.

Referring now to the drawings, I show at 20 a suitable supporting table or bench having legs 2!, a rectangular bed frame 22 supported on top of legs 2|, and a top 2'3 comprising transverselyextending planks 24, resting on edge on frame 22 and drawn together by long tension rods 25 and nuts 25. Secured down to top 23, near the longitudinal edges thereof, are longitudinally extending guide strips 21 adapted to receive the work between them.

In certain of the figures of the drawings, the work W is shown in the form of two separate skeleton box structures, received on table 20 between guide strips 21 and extending substantially from end to end of the press. The press may, of course, be designed to accommodate but one structure at a time, though in the present instance it is convenient to handle two structures W simultaneously, side by side. The structures W, which might, for example, be Wing spar structures, are shown as having top plywood sheets or layers 75 (see Fig. 3) which are to be understood as the members intended to be glued down to the structures W. By way of further description of a typical application, the spar structures W may be of typical cellular construction, understood to comprise a. multiplicity of cell defining surfaces or walls having edges coplanar with its top surface, and it is to such surfaces or edges, as well as to the edges of the sides and ends of the members W, that the top sheet if is to be glued. The heat and pressure applying members now about to be described are designed for uniform application of heat and pressure simultaneously to the top surface of the top sheets orlayers t, by which the latter may be caused to become glued securely to the various edge surfaces of the structures W which they engage.

Overlying the work members W is a vertically movable head structure 39, which incorporates the later described heating and pressure means. This head structure includes a relatively heavy top 3! comprising transversely extending planks 32 placed face to face and drawn together by means of long tension rods 33 and nuts tithe structure being similar to, and directly overlying the top structure 23 of supporting table 2%. At suitable points along the two sides of the press, the planking making up the table top 23 and the head structure top 3] is extended to provide footings 36 for hydraulic jacks 3'3, and abutments 38 by which said jacks'may engage and elevate the head as. As here shown, provisions are made for two such jacks along each side of the press, although any suitable number may of course be employed depending both upon the length and weight of the press, and the size of the jacks to be used.

Preferably, the top 31 of head structure 30 is provided on its underside, along its two longitudinal edges, with legs 4!) which are adapted when the head structure has been lowered by jacks 31 to engage foot plates M secured to the upper side of table top 23.

Secured to the undersides of the longitudinal edge portions of head structure top 3| are aprons M3, here shown as comprising three-ply wood structures (see Figs. 3 and 4), and secured to the bottoms of these aprons 46 are plates 4'! which project inwardly somewhat from the aprons to provide a narrow ledge 41a, as may be seen by inspecting Figs. 3 and 4. Resting on these ledges are end projections 50 of slats i which'extend transversely across the press. There are a large number of these slats 5i lying substantially in engagement with one another, and the entire bed or curtain of slats makes up a somewhat flexible structure through which downward pressure may be exerted with substantial uniformity over the entire area of the bed.

Above the slats 5! is a somewhat flexible sheet 52, conveniently fabricated of press board, which, together with the lower surface of head structure top 3!, defines a compartment 53 for the pneumatic element of the press. Mounted insideaprons 36 and between slat projections 5b 47a, of plate t1, defining a pocket for the reception of the slat projections 55. The slats 5! are preferably positioned longitudinally of the press by means of screws 63 passing through ledges Ma and into strips 56, said screws being receivable in notches 62 in the ends of slat projections 56 (Fig. 6).

While pneumatic means in the usual form of a rubber bag might be used within the compartment 53, the invention in its preferred form provides pneumatic means in the form of a plurality of flexible tubes 65, arranged parallel to one another and in a direction longitudinally of the press, that is, at right angles to the transversely extending bed slats 5!. And while these flexible tubes might be of any suitable material, as rubber, I prefer to employ for the purpose fabric hoses of the type conventionally employed as fire hose. At the end of the press seen in Fig. 8, the ends of these tubes or hoses are closed by means of conventional caps 66, which are fitted with metal tubes 68 through which air under pressure may be introduced. The tubes 68 lead from a header 69, which is in turn fed from a supply pipe line Til controlled by a valve H and provided with a pressure gage lilQ Air may be discharged from the system by means of pipe 13 having valve 74. The individual feed tubes 68 may be provided with individual valves 15. At the other ends of the press, the tubes or hoses 65 may be closed by means of suitable caps (not shown) similar to the caps 66, but without the air connections 68. These ends of the tubes do not appear in Fig. 1 showing the other end of the press as they are obscured by an end wall or apron 1e. v

In the present illustrative embodiment of the invention, there is, immediately below slats 5!, a plurality of spaced, wooden strips 88, disposed so as to cross the slatsel. In the present embodi ment, the strips are arranged substantially at 45 degrees tothe slats 5|, so that each of the slats is crossed by a plurality of strips 88. Secured to the lower edges of the spaced angular strips 8B is a plywood sheet BI, and the latter rests on and is carried by a bed over transversely extending steam tubes 82, of rectangular crosssection. At each end of the somewhat flexible partition structure comprising the-angular strips 35 and plywood sheet 8! is an end strip 800: (Fig. 1), to which is secured a cleat Ma that partially overhangs the steam tubes e2.

The steam tubes 82 are preferably arranged in pairs, each pair having a pair of end-closing plates 83, and each of said plates 83 being flexibly suspended from the overlying apron 46 by means of a flexible supporting element, such as a chain 84, The flat undersides of the tubes 82 are engageable with the plywood tops t which are to be glued to the box structures W. Steam is admitted to one end of each pair of steam tubes 82 by means of a tube 85 leading from a steam supply header 87, which is suspended from the head structure by a flexible supporting element such as flexible chain 88. Steam is introduced to the header 8'! by means of a suitable connection 89 (see Fi 1). The admission tube 86 for each pair of steam tubes 82 opens through plate 83-within one of the two tubes 82, and the steam flows into the other of the tubes by means of a suitable intercommunicating port 89 near' the steam entry ends of the tubes. A similar port 89 establishes communication between the other ends of the tubes, and a steam outflow pipe 90 extending downwardly from one of the tubes takes the used steam from the pair. The tubes 90 communicate with a discharge header 9I, suspended from the head of the press by a flexible element such as chain 92, which is here shown as hung from a bracket 93 secured to the side of top 3 I. end thereof a suitable steam discharge line 95 (Fig. 2).

As will be seen in Fig. 5, the chain-suspended steam tubes carry the plywood sheet 8| and an gular strips 80 when the press is open, the slats being carried by the ledges 41a. When the press is closed, however, the steam pipes come to rest upon the work, and the space between the upper edges of strips 80 and the slats 5| is taken up, the chains 84 hanging slack. The major weight of the head structure is at such time assumed by the legs 4! which are then in engagement with the supporting table, and the relations are such that the slat projections 50 are at the same tim elevated slightly above ledges 47a (Figs, 3 and 4).

Clamping means are provided for securing the vertically movable head 30 tightly down to table 20 when the press is in closed position. The preferred clamping means comprises a plurality of vertically arranged bars I'IIIl anchored at their tops to the top of the vertically movable head structure, and releasably engageable at their lower ends with the top of supporting table 20. As here shown, the bars I00 pass through apertures IIlI formed in the webs of channel irons I02 secured along the two longitudinal edges of the top sides of head top 3|. Cross-piece I03 carried by the upper end portions of the bars I00 engage washers I04 which rest on the web of the channel member and which are of a larger size than the apertures IBI of the latter. The apertures in the washers I04 receive the bars IIII] with a comparatively loose fit, so as to permit the bars Hill to be swung outwardly, as to the positions of Fig. 5, to permit the lower ends of the bars to be cleared from the latter described clamping brackets.

Bars IIllI pass downwardly through notches I III and III formed in the edges of the head top 3| and table top 23, respectively. Secured to table frame 22, just below the notches III', are clamp brackets I I5, having upper walls I I8 formed with notches I ll aligned with the notches II I. These notches II? are flanked by bearing plates IIB secured to the undersides of the upper bracket walls IIB. The lower ends of the bars I00 carry clamp devices comprising pairs of cam levers I2Il pivotally connected to the bars I00 and formed with cam shoulders I20a of gradually increasing radius adapted to engage the bearing plates I I8. When the levers I28 are elevated (swung relatively outwardly from the bars) the cam shoulders may be moved easily under the bearing plates H8, the press of course being assumed to be closed. Downward movement of the levers I20 then sets the clamp devices up tightly, placing the bars HIE! under tension, and securing the movable head structure of the press tightly down in operative position,

In case the press is fairly long between the points of support of the head structure by the hydraulic jacks 37, the head structure may, if unbraced, tend to sag to a slight but undesirable degree between those points of support. Accordingly, I preferably provide bracing means comprising uprights I2I mounted in each of the channel members I02, approximately in the transverse plane of the hydraulic jacks 31, and

Outflow header 9| has coupled to one cables I22 and I23 connected between the upper ends of these uprights, and points of anchorage to the channel members, the cables I22 being connected near the ends of the channel members and the cables I23 being connected near the center thereof. As here shown, each of the cables I22 arid I23 is connected at its upper end to cross-shaft I24 mounted in the upper ends of the associated pair of uprights I2I. The lower ends of said cables are connected to turn buckles 25, to which are connected hooks I26 engaging with suitable eyes in straps I21 weldedi or other.- wise secured to the channel members I02. The turnbuckles I25 permit adjustment of tension in the cables, and may be adjusted to assure proper support of the channel members I02. The channel members I02 are secured firmly to the top structure 3! by means of bolts I30 extending downwardly through the webs of the channel members, the top 3 I, aprons 46 and plates 41, nuts I3 I securing the parts in assembly, all as clearly appears in Figs. 3 and 4.

Operation of the press is as follows:

The head structure of the press being elevated by means of jacks 31 to the position of Fig. 3, the work structures W with their top members if freshly glued thereto are inserted from one end. The tubes or hoses 65 are at this time deflated, the slats 5! are resting on the ledge 41a, and the angular strips 8!] and steam pipes 82 hang freely from the supporting chains 84, there being a little space between the slats 5| and the strips 80. Steam will at this time be flowing through the system, entering via header 81, passing through the steam pipes 82 and leaving via outflow header SI. The head structure 39 is then lowered by means of jacks 31. Just before the legs 40 strike bottom, the steam pipes 82 engage the top t of the work, so that as the head structure 30 then continues downwardly the small remaining distance, the supporting chains as slacken and the slats 5 I become elevated slightly relatively to their supporting ledges 41a. There is preferably provided only a fraction of an inch of such downward movement of the head structure following engagement of the steam pipes with the work. Such downward movement is terminated, as heretofore indicated, by the engagement of legs 40 with foot plates SI. The clamp bars IIlil are then moved inwardly to the position of Fig. 3 and the clamp levers are set up, following which compressed air is introduced to the ends of the hoses 65. These hoses then assume positions such as indicated in Figs. 3 and 4, their sides flattening somewhat against the underside of the top 3I and against the sheet 52 overlying the slats 5|. By this means, a substantial downward pressure is exerted on the bed of flexibly supported slats 5|, being transmitted in turn through the crossstrips 59, the plywood sheet 8! and the steam pipes 82 to the top members 15, pressing the latter firmly and uniformly down on the structures W. The various members provided between the hoses and the work are designed for a certain degree of flexibility and to permit a slight amount of working of the various components relatively to one another, thereby accomplishing a uniform transmission of pressure from the hoses 65 to the work over the entire area of the latter.

Figs. 9 and 10 show a modification of the means which elevates the head structure of the press. The press in this instance may be regarded as similar in all essential respects to the embodiment previously described, excepting for the modified elevating means, and excepting for the further fact that the press of Figs. 9 and 10 is shown as considerably shortened relatively to its width, being in fact nearly square as viewed in plan (Fig. 9). Forconvenience, components of the press of Figs. 9 and 10 corresponding to those of the embodiment of Figs. 1-8 will be identified by similar reference numerals but with the subletter a appended.

At the four corners of the press are arranged vertical columns i553, provided at their lower ends with floor flanges {L Diagonally opposite pairs of these columns I59 support pairs of spaced members I 52 which extend diagonally across over the top of the press, the structure forming a cross, as appears in Fig. 9. The center of this cross supports the base of an air cylinder I55, the plunger I58 of which carries a cross-head I51. Four cables E58 connected to this cross-head extend downwardly within the channels or spaces between the pairs of members I52, passing under pulleys [59 carried by the members I52, thence outwardly and over pulleys 560 also supported by members i522, and finally downwardly to connect with the flanges of channel members lilZa.

'I'o elevate the head structure of the press, air is introduced tocylinder I55, causing the plunger H555 to move upwardly, and so moving the cables 558 in the proper direction to elevate the head structure; Attention is called to the fact that the center of the cross formed by the members I02 does not carry any part of the load of the head structure, which is imposed entirely on the pulleys I50 located immediately adjacent the supporting columns I50. There is of course tension in the cables E58 between the cross-head l5? and the pulleys 559, but there is no downward load on the center of the cross-structure beyond that imposed by the weight of the air cylinder itself. When air is exhausted from the cylinder I55, a coil spring around piston lfifi is engaged by cross-head. E5! to support the latter and the piston I56 in such a way as will avoid undesirable slacking of the cables I58.

Fig. 3a shows a further feature of the invention, employed where it may be desired to modify the total pressure exerted by the tubes over a local area. For example, it may for some reason become desirable to exert a somewhat increased downward force over certain areas. According to the present invention, this purpose may be accomplished by local modification of the depth of the hose receiving chamber over the selected area. Thus, as in Fig. 3a, which illustrates one means for carrying the idea into effect, the depth of the hose receiving chamber has been decreased by the introduction over certain of the hoses of a plank or sheet !65 of the requisite thickness, and which may extend from end to end of the press, or as maybe required for the problem in hand. The resultinglocally decreased depth of the chamber causes the hoses within the area involved to be more greatly flattened, with greater effective areas pressed against the floor of the chamber. Accordingly, even though the air pressure within the hoses remains unchanged, the total downward force is increased.

I have now disclosed the invention by way of giving a complete detailed description of certain present illustrative embodiments thereof; it will, of course, be understood that this is for illustrative purposes only and that various changes in design, structure and arrangement may be made Without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention or of the appended claims.

. I claim: I

1. In a'gluing'press, the combination of a support for the article to be glued, a cover over said support, means for elevating and lowering said cover relative to said support, a plurality of heatingelements adapted to engage said article on said support, flexible supporting means flexibly suspending said heating elements directly from said cover, a flexible partition carried by said heating elements and suspended with said heating elements by said flexible supporting means, a chamber in said cover for a pneumatic expansion means, pneumatic expansion means in said chamber, said chamber including a-flexible bottom wall through which the pressure from said pneumatic means may be exerted downwardly, said flexible bottom wall coming against said flexible partition and said flexible partition andheating elements coming to rest against said article to be glued when said cover is lowered, and means for clamping said cover down in 1owered position.

2. In a gluing press, the combination of a support for the article to be glued, a cover over said support, means comprising a, plurality of hydraulic jacks acting between said support and said cover for elevating and lowering said cover relative to said support, a plurality of heating elements adapted to engage said article on said support, flexible supporting means flexibly suspending said heating elements directly from said cover, a flexible partition carried by said heating elements and suspended with said heating elements by said flexible supporting means, a chamber in said cover for a pneumatic expansion means, pneumatic expansion means in said chamber, said chamber including a flexible bottom wall through which the pressure from said pneumatic means may be exerted downwardly, said flexible bottom wall coming against said flexible partition and said flexible partition and heating elements coming to rest against said article to be glued when said cover is lowered, and means for clamping said cover down in lowered position.

3. In a gluing press, the combination of a support for the article to be glued, a cover over said support, means for elevating and lowering said cover relative to said support, said means comprising a supporting structure erected over the press, a pneumatic cylinder carried thereby and provided with a piston, and cables operated by said piston and connected to said cover, a plurality of heating elements adapted to engage said article on said support, flexible supporting means flexibly suspending said heating elements directly from said cover, a flexible partition carried by said heatin elements and suspended with said heating elements by said flexible supporting means, a chamber in said cover for a pneumatic expansion means, pneumatic expansion means in said chamber, said chamber including a flexible bottom wall through which the pressure from said pneumatic means may be exerted downwardly, said flexible bottom wall coming against said flexible partition and said flexible partition and heating elements coming to rest against said article to be glued when said cover is lowered, and means for clamping said cover down in lowered position.

4. In a gluing press, the combination of a support for the article to be glued, a cover over said support, means for elevating and lowering said cover relative to said support, a plurality of heating elements in the form of parallel steam bars adapted to engage said article on said support, flexible supporting means flexibly suspending said heating elements directly from said cover, a flexible partition carried by said heating elements and suspendedwith said heating elements by said flexible supporting means, a chamber in said cover for a pneumatic expansion means, pneumatic expansion means in said chamber, said chamber including a flexible bottom wall through which the pressure from said pneumatic means may be exerted downwardly, said flexible bottom wall coming against said flexible partition and said flexible partition and heating elements coming to rest against said article to be glued when said cover is lowered, and mean for clamping said cover down in lowered position.

5. In a gluing press, the combination of a support for the article to be glued, a cover over said support, means for elevating and lowering said cover relative to said support, a plurality of heating elements adapted to engage said article on said support, flexible supporting means flexibly suspending said heating elements from said cover, a flexible partition carried by said heating elements and suspended with said heating elements by said flexible supporting means, a chamber in said cover for a pneumatic expansion means, pneumatic expansion means in said chamber comprising a plurality of parallel flexible hoses of reater normal diameter than the depth of said chamber, said chamber including a flexible bottom wall through which pressure from said hoses may be exerted downwardly when said hoses are inflated and thereby somewhat flattened thereagainst, said flexible bottom wall coming against said flexible partition and said flexible partition and heating elements coming to rest against said article to be glued when said cover is lowered, and means for clamping said cover down in lowered position.

6. In a gluing press, the combination of a support for the article to be glued, a cover over said support, means for elevating and lowering said cover relative to said support, a plurality of heating elements adapted to engage said article on said support, flexible supporting means flexibly suspending said heating elements from said cover, a flexible partition carried by said heating elements and suspended with said heating elements by said flexible supporting means, a chamber in said cover for a pneumatic expansion means, pneumatic expansion means in said chamber comprising a plurality of parallel flexible hoses of greater normal diameter than the depth of said chamber, said chamber including a flexible bottom wall through which pressure from said hoses may be exerted downwardly when said hoses are inflated and thereby somewhat flattened thereagainst, means for locally modifying the depth of said chamber within a selected area and thereby the extent of flattening of certain of the hoses, said flexible bottom wall coming against said flexible partition and said flexible partition and heating elemenst coming to rest against said article to be glued when said cover is lowered, and means for clamping said cover down in lowered position.

'7. In a gluing press, a substantially rectangular supporting table on which an article may be supported and adapted to receive such article from an end thereof, a substantially rectangular cover of similar outline supported over said table, means for vertically elevating and lowering said cover relative to said table, a plurality of parallel steam bars disposed transversely of said table and cover flexibly supported from said cover from the two edges of said cover, a flexible partition carried by said steam bars, a chamber in said cover for pneumatic expansion means and including a top surface and a flexible bottom wall, a plurality of flexible pneumatic hoses arranged parallel to one another in said chamber and extending substantially from end to end of said table and cover, said hoses being of normal diameters greater than the depth of said chamber, said flexible bottom wall of said chamber coming against said flexible partition and said flexible heating elements coming to rest against said article to be glued when said cover is lowered, and clamping means extending between said cover and table along the two sides thereof for clamping said cover down in lowered position.

8. In a gluing press, the combination of a support for the article to be glued, a cover over said support, means for elevating and lowering said cover relative to said support, said means comprising a supporting structure erected over the press, a pneumatic cylinder carried thereby and provided with a piston, and cables operated by said piston and connected to said cover, a plurality of heating elements adapted to engage said article on said support, means suspending said heating elements from said cover, a chamber in said cover for a pneumatic expansion means, pneumatic expansion means in said chamber, said chamber including a flexible bottom wall through which the pressure from said pneumatic means may be exerted downwardly, said heating elements coming to rest against said article to be glued when said cover is in a lowered position, and said flexible bottom wall being adapted to exert downward pressure on said heating means in said lowered position, and means for clamping said cover in said lowered position.

EDWARD J. KLASSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2665737 *Aug 26, 1949Jan 12, 1954Goodrich Co B FApparatus for seaming plastic sheet material
US2671940 *Feb 7, 1949Mar 16, 1954Vacuum Concrete IncMolding apparatus
US2841823 *Feb 8, 1954Jul 8, 1958Carroll H Van HartesveldtMolding apparatus
US2902714 *Aug 23, 1955Sep 8, 1959Herbert G JohnsonRod extrusion press
US2935116 *Mar 24, 1958May 3, 1960Gen Dynamics CorpBonding apparatus
US3055058 *Mar 25, 1955Sep 25, 1962Carroll H Van HartesveldtProcess for molding a glass fiberpolyester resin article
US3135998 *Nov 3, 1960Jun 9, 1964Jr Aubrey A FowlerFluid pressure operated press
US3172173 *Jul 26, 1961Mar 9, 1965 ellms
US3245121 *Jul 13, 1962Apr 12, 1966Graff Roderich WilhelmApparatus for making hardened reinforced bands of synthetic resins
US3318232 *Apr 29, 1963May 9, 1967Robert R BartronApparatus for forming sheet plastic and laminating it to an underlayment
US3376808 *Oct 24, 1966Apr 9, 1968Beckett Harcum CompanyFluid-operated press
US3816044 *Feb 7, 1973Jun 11, 1974Foldcraft CoAutomatic press
US4017572 *Apr 15, 1975Apr 12, 1977The Upjohn CompanyMethod of molding articles of polymeric foam substantially free from flashing
US4043730 *Apr 28, 1976Aug 23, 1977Luigi BettonicaHydraulic press for the production of tiles, dishes, cups of ceramic material and the like
US4388860 *Dec 2, 1981Jun 21, 1983Wagener Schwelm Gmbh & Co.Belt press with enclosed hydraulic actuator
US4393766 *Jul 24, 1981Jul 19, 1983Wagener Schwelm Gmbh & Co.Belt press with hose-type actuator
US5487332 *May 2, 1994Jan 30, 1996Gottfried Joos Maschinenfabrik Gmbh & Co.Platen press for woodworking
US5601015 *Oct 18, 1994Feb 11, 1997Firma Theodor HymmenApparatus for continuously making a multilayered, flat workpiece
Classifications
U.S. Classification100/322, 100/278, 425/406, 425/DIG.190, 100/269.3, 100/219
International ClassificationB27D3/00, B30B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S425/019, B30B1/003, B27D3/00
European ClassificationB30B1/00D, B27D3/00