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Publication numberUS2411804 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1946
Filing dateJan 8, 1944
Priority dateJan 8, 1944
Publication numberUS 2411804 A, US 2411804A, US-A-2411804, US2411804 A, US2411804A
InventorsPlebanck Leonard Z
Original AssigneePlebanck Leonard Z
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radio kaleidoscopic projector
US 2411804 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV- 25, 1946. a.. z. PLEBANEK RADIO KALEIDOSCOPIC PROJECTOR Filed Jan. 8, 1944 3 Sheets-Sheet l .lizzie/@kr Leonard Z .Pleanek jfforrz.

Nov. 26, 1946. L.. z. PLEBANEK 2,411,804

RADIO KALEIDOSCOPIC PROJECTOR Filed Jan. 8, 1944 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Nov. 26, 1946. L, z. PLEBANEK 2,411,804

RADIO KALEIDOSCOPIC PROJECTOR Filed Jan. 8, 1944 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 K [fave/ruler Leofzzgdpleazzek Patented Nov. ze, 1946 UNITED srA'rEs PATENT' OFFICE,

Leonard Z. Plebanek, Chicago, lll.

Application January 8, 1944, Serial No. 517,596

This invention relates to a kaleidoscoplc projector and concerns itself primarily with means for projecting a constantly varying or changing pattern on a screen and it is an object of this invention to provide such an apparatus which is 16 Claims.' (Cl. 88-24) responsive to sound air waves preferably emitted loud speaker especially during a musical program; during such musical program, the various patterns will substantially follow the tempo or rhythm of the music.

During the use of such an apparatus, many artistic and beautiful patterns may be formed or created and in the event that it is desired to obtain a copy or impression of such pattern or design, this may be done by Ishutting' off the radio or source of the sound air waves. The light will, of course be left on while the copy or impression is taken.

With these and other objects in view which will become apparent as the description proceeds, this invention comprises the novel structure and combinations of parts hereinafter described and more particularly pointed outand defined in the appended claims. i

In the accompanying drawings which illustrate a preferred form of this invention and in which similar reference numerals refer to similar fea tures n the different views;

Figi is a longitudinal sectional view of an apparatus involving this invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially upon the line 2-2 of Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the apparatus with the casing shown in section.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken upon the line 4 4 of Fig. l looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged sectional View taken upon the line'5-'5 of Fig. l looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figs. 6 and 7 are views similar to Fig. 5 showing sections of the other light units.

Fig. 8 is an enlarged sectional View taken upon the line 8-805 Fig. l.

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken substantially upon the line 9 9 of Fig. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows and showing parts in elevation.

Fig. 10 is an elevational View of the screen showing one form oi an image and taken upon the line lli-I 0 of Fig. 3.

In referring tothe drawings which illustrate an embodiment of this invention, there is shown a casing Il which is closed except as to its rear end which may be open or provided with an aperture for receiving the sound air waves from a radio loud speaker. The sound air waves entering the casing are adapted to operate ve dia.- phragms, i3, iii, i5, I6 and 28 (Figs. l and 3). The diaphragme i3 and 28 are designed to be operated always during the use of the apparatus while the diaphragms i4, I5 and i6 may at times not be all in operation depending upon the pitch of the sound air waves. In other words, they are designed to respond to the pitch of the sound air waves; thus one may respond to a low pitch, another to a medium pitch andthe other to a high pitch. Then there may be partial response from one or more and complete response from others. This variation in responsive action produces a mixture of colors that varies the color oi the pat tern or design as will later more fully appear.

The diaphragm i3 (Figs'l and 9) is connected to a bracket frame il having a base portion te resting upon the bottom of the casing ii. The diaphragm i3 is connected with a link i9 which in turn is connected to an arm or lever 2li plv otally mounted upon a bracket 2i rising from the base i8 and carrying a pawl 22 on its upper end for operating a ratchet wheel'2t which is held from reverse rotation by a holding pawl 24. The ratchet `wheel 23 is :East cna stub shaft 25 mounted in ball bearings 26 housed in the bracket frame il. The upper end of the shaft 25 carries a spider 2l which supports a ring 27a that carries a dished diaphragm 2t previously referred to and which is in the form of a tray. The tray contains objects 29, 3E, 3i, 32, 33, and 3e of various shapes and designs which may be made of light material such as paper, tinsel or Celluloid.

Rotation of the stub shaft 25 step by step by the ratchet wheel'23 will rotate the tray 28 and change the positions o the objects therein with respect to the rays of light that illuminate the objects as will later appear, while the vibrations imparted to the tray by the sound air waves will move the objects 29 to 34 relative to each other so 'that a continually changing or varying pattern or design with respect to the projected image will be produced.

Above the tray 28, there is a hood 36 which is supported over the tray by arms 38 which may extend from the bracket il. The hood 36 is provided with an opening 39 in its top for the exit of reflected rays from the objects in the tray, which rays pass thru the open top of the tray and the open bottom of the hood. Above the opening 39 in the hood, the hood is provided with a neck portion 36a in which are secured convex lenses 44a in spaced relation that tend to brighten and render more deinite the pattern that is projected.

Rays of diierently colored light are adapted to be thrown upon the objects 29 to 34 from the light units 4|, 42, and 43, each of which carries a light bulb 4U at its top. These units are spaced 120 degrees apart and are at an elevation for projecting light rays upon the objects. Each unit is of similar construction; that is they are alike except as otherwise noted so a description of one will generally apply to the others. A spherical light reiiecting member dla is positioned under the cover Mb of each light casing. Light rays will be reflected from the reectors ila in a downward direction and many will pass thru the condenser lenses 4&-44 which are mounted in cylindrical neck portions dic upon the lower ends of the light casings. These condenser lenses are plano-convex and are mounted in spaced relation and serve to illuminate strongly the objects in the tray.

The neck portions Mc of the light casings are provided with slots 45 between the lenses dii-Lid. The slot in the casing dl is adapted for receiving a red film disk 36; the slot in the casing i2 is designed to receive a yellow lm disk lil; and the slot in the casing d3 is adapted to receive a blue lm disk 138. Each color lm d6, 4l and i8 is carried by a similar lever i9 which is pivoted at its upper endl in an arm 50 extending from the frame bracket il. Each lever 49 has a foot 59a to which the color lms are attached in any suitable manner. Each lever i9 is connected by a strut or arm 5i with its respective diaphragmhi, l5 or i6 of the artificial light units.

The diaphragms lli, l5 and i6 should be of different strength, yieldability or size so that one will respond to sound air waves of low pitch; another to sound air waves of medium pitch andthe other to sound air waves of high pitch. As these diaphragms are iiexed by sound air waves, the levers 69 will be actuated in accordance with the pitch of such waves to move their respective films into the paths of the light rays passing thru the condenser lenses, which rays will illuminate strongly the objects 29 to 3d in the tray 28. The light units may be secured in position at the most advantageous angle by welding or in any other suitable manner.

From the strongly illuminated objects in tray 28 which have reecting surfaces, rays of light will be reflected upwardly thru the aperture 3Q in the hood 36 and pass thru the double convex lenses 35a which will strengthen the illumination cast upon an inclined mirror 52 suitably supported from which rays of light will be reflected upon the interior surface of a V-shaped light reector 53 which has an linterior angle of sixty degrees which creates a six sided kaleidoscopic design. The interior surfaces of the reector are preferably highly polished.

Rays of light will be reflected from the reector 53 (Figs. 1 and 4) and pass thru a pair f The image projected upon the screen 5l' may be of the design or pattern 5l shown in Fig. 10. But this design or pattern will constantly change or be varied due to the shimmering or movements of the objects 29 to 34 in the tray 28 caused by the vibrations imparted to such tray by the sound air waves emitted by the radio loud speaker l2. At the same time, the colors of the image projected will be changed in accordance with the pitch of the sound waves acting upon the diaphragms i4, l5 and i6. This change of pitch will especially be pronounced during a musical program on the radio when high, low and intermediate notes are uttered.

Thus thru a changing color scheme and the vibratory movement of the objects forming the basis of the projected image, the patterns or designs of the image are constantly changed in an interesting and fascinating manner.

The apparatus is readily adapted to home use by positioning the same with the open end toward a radio loud speaker. The lights i0 should, of course, be turned on when it is desired to use the apparatus. Thereafter the apparatus functions automatically; the sound air waves operating the diierent diaphragms for eiecting changes in color, design or pattern of the image projected while the reflected light rays project the dlierent patterns or designs.

In practice, it may be desirable to place the apparatus in a radio cabinet or the like or it can be positioned in any convenient location adjacent thereto. The screen upon which the kaleidoscopic pattern is projected will, of course, be located in a vreadily observable place. After a kaleidoscopic pattern has been projectedl the action of the sound waves which cause the objects to move and change their locations and cause the reflected light to change the color of the light reected from the objects will be instrumental in causing a continual change in the projected kaleidoscopic design that may be very fascinating to observe.

On account of the ease with which the objects `29 to 3d may be changed for diierent objects of scopic designs and in this way the apparatus may serve as a creator of new patterns or designs.

I am aware that many changes may be made and various details of construction may be varied without departing from the principles of this in- Vention so I do not propose limiting the patent that may be granted thereon otherwise than necessitated by the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a kaleidoscope, a screen, means for projecting a constantly changing pattern on said screen comprising a diaphragmatic tray, movable objects of diierent size and design in said tray, means including a diaphragm for rotating said tray, a, plurality of light projecting units surrounding said tray at an elevation for casting light rays upon said objects for reflection therefrom, a differently colored lm disk associated with each unit and adapted for movement into and out of the path of the rays of its unit, a, diaphragm connected to each unit disk, each of said last mentioned diaphragms beingresponsive to diierent pitch of sound air waves emitted from a radio loud speaker.

2. In an apparatus of the class described, a screen, means for projecting a constantly changing pattern upon said screen comprising a plurality ofilight reecting objects of diierent design, a diaphragmatic tray for supporting said objects, a shaft connected to said tray, a ratchet wheel carried by said shaft, a pivoted lever having a pawl engaging said ratchet wheel and a diaphragm responsive to sound air waves from a radio loud speaker having a connection with said lever.

3. In an apparatus of the class described, a screen, means for projecting a constantly changing pattern upon said screen comprising a piurality of light reflecting objects of different shapes, a diaphragmatic tray for supporting said objects, a shaft connected to said tray and means for intermittently rotating said shaft 'and tray comprising a diaphragm responsive to sound air waves from a radio-loud speaker and an operative driving connection between said shaft and said diaphragm.

4. In a kaleidoscope, a screen, light reflecting means for projecting a constantly changing pattern upon said screen comprising 1ight reecting objects of different designs, means for moving said objects, spaced means for casting pencils of light rays upon said objects and means for changing the color of said light rays comprising a plurality of differently colored disks, one associated with each pencil of light rays, a diaphragm for each disk, an operative connection between each disk and its diaphragm, each diaphragm being responsive to a different pitch of sound air waves and a source of sound air waves of different pitch for operating said diaphragms.

5. In a kaleidoscope, a screen, a plurality of light reecting members, light reflecting objects of different designs for receiving the rays of light from said members, means for moving said objects, a differently colored film disk movable into and out of the pencil of light rays emitted by each member, diaphragms responsive to different pitches of sound air waves, each having an operative connection with a disk and a source of sound air waves of different pitch for impinglng against said diaphragme.

6. In a kaleidoscope, a screen, light reflecting means for projecting a constantly changing pattern upon said screen comprising light reflecting objects of different designs, means for moving said objects, spaced light reflecting members for directing light rays upon said objects, a separate film disk associated with the iight rays from each member, a device connected to each film disk, each device being responsive to a different pitch of sound airwaves, and a source of sound air 'waves susceptible of diierentpitch for operating said devices. I

7. In a kaleidoscope, a screen, means for projecting a constantly changing pattern upon said screen comprising a plurality of light reflecting objects of different designs, a diaphragmatic tray for supporting said objects,v means including a shaft connected to said tray for providing an operating connection, a diaphragm responsive to sound air waves, operating means between said diaphragm and shaft for intermittently rotating the latter and a source of sound air waves for vibrating said diaphragms for agitating the objects in said tray diaphragm and causing rotation of the same.

8. In a kaleidoscopic apparatus for projecting a constantly changing pattern upon a screen including a plurality of movable light reflecting objects, light ray reflecting units for casting raysv upon said movable objects, a plurality of differently colored nlm discs adapted for projection into the path of said rays, means for supporting said nlm discs for movement into andv out of the path of said rays, a source of sound air waves of different pitch and members having different pitch responsiveness, each connected to a disc supporting means and being responsive to said source of sound air waves.

9. In a kaleidoscopic apparatus for projecting a constantly changing pattern upon a screen including a plurality of movable objects of different shapes having light reflecting surfaces, a plurality of light projecting devices for directing light rays upon said objects and having guide way-s, a differently colored film disc positioned in each guide way, means for supporting each disc l5 for movement into and out of the light rays emerging from its device, a source of air waves of different pitch, and members having different degrees of responsiveness, one connected with each disc supporting means and responsive to -said source of air waves.

10. In a kaleidoscopic apparatus for projecting a continuously changing pattern upon a screen, a diaphragmatic tray, movable objects having light reflecting surfaces in said tray, means between said tray and screen for projecting the pattern of said objects upon said screen, a plurality of light reflecting units at an elevation for projecting light rays upon said objects and having guideways, a differently colored film disc associated with each unit and positioned in the guideway thereof, means for supporting and moving each disc into and out of the light rays of its unitl comprising dlaphragmsof differing responsiveness, each diaphragm having a connection with a film disc support, and a source of sound air Waves of different pitch for Vibrating said diaphragm and said tray.

11. In a, kaleidoscopic apparatus for projecting a constantly changing pattern upon a screen including a diaphragmatic tray having light refleeting objects therein, a plurality of spaced light reflecting units for directing pencils of rays upon said objects, means for supporting a differently colored film disc adjacent each pencil of light rays, diaphragms of different responsiveness, re-

spectively connected to said disc supporting means and responsive to different sound Waves from a radio loud speaker or the like.

i2. In a kaleidoscope comprising a screen, and a rotary and vibratory tray containing iight renecting objects with means between said screen and tray for projecting the pattern reflected from said objects upon said screen, a plurality of spaced light reflecting units surrounding said tray for reflecting light rays upon said objects, each unit comprising a conical housing with a cylindrical neck projecting toward said tray, spaced condenser lens in said neck the neck of each unit having a slot between its lenses, a movable support mounted adjacent each unit, a differently colored lm disc carried by each support and adapted for movement into and out of the slot in the adjacent housing, a plurality of diaphragms of different sound pitchA responsiveness, one connected to each support and a source of varying vpitch of sound air waves for operating said diaphragms and tray.

13. In a kaleidoscope comprising a screen and a rotary and vibratory tray containing light reflecting objects with means between said screen and objects for projecting the pattern reflected from said objects upon said screen, a plurality of spaced light reflecting units surrounding said tray, each unit comprising a conical housing with a neck portion directed toward said tray, each 2,41 LOQ:

neck portion having a slot, a dierently colored nim disc adapted for movement into each slot and into the rays passing through the neck portion thereof, a movable support for each nlm disc, diaphragms of different sound pitch responsiveness, one connected to each movable support and a source of varying pitch of sound air waves for operating said diaphragms.

14. In a, kaleidoscope comprising a screen and a rotary and vibratory tray containing light reiecting objects therein with means between said screen and objects for projecting the pattern reflected from said objects upon said screen, a plurality of spaced light reflecting units surrounding said tray'for reecting pencils of light rays upon said objects, a movable support ad jacent the path of each pencil of ray, a dierently colored film disc carried by each movable support for movement into the adjacent pencil of light rays, diaphragms of different sound pitch responsiveness, one connected to each support and a source of varying pitch sound air waves for operating said diaphragme.

15. In a kaleidoscopic apparatus, a screen, a vibratory tray, movable light reecting objects in said tray, means between said tray and screen for reflecting the pattern from said objects upon said screen, a plurality of light ray reecting units surrounding said tray for casting pencils of light rays upon said object-s, and each having a guide way, a dierently colored nlm disc in each guide way, a movable support for each nlm disc, diaphragms of dierent sound pitch responsiveness, one connected to each support, and a source of varying sound pitch air waves for operating said diaphragms and tray.

16. In a kaleidoscopic apparatus, a screen, means for projecting a constantly changing pattern upon said screen comprising a pair of spaced condenser lenses in cooperative relation with said screen, a reector for directing light rays into said lenses, a mirror for reecting light upon said reflector, a tray, movable objects having light reflecting surfaces in said tray, means for rotat ing and vibrating said tray, a light ray conducting cylinder extending above said tray, spaced lenses in said cylinder for directing light rays upon said mirror, a plurality of spaced light projecting units surrounding said tray at an elevation for reecting light rays upon said objects, each unit having a pair of spaced condenser lenses, movable supports adjacent each unit, a differently colored film disc carried by each support and movable between the condenser lenses into and out of its unit, diaphragms responsive todifferent pitches of sound air waves, one connected to each support and a source of sound air Waves for operating said diaphragms.

LEONARD Z. PLEBANEK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2607269 *Dec 31, 1947Aug 19, 1952Elsaesser Johann FriedrichProjecting kaleidoscope with rapidly oscillated elements and particles
US2780135 *Apr 16, 1954Feb 5, 1957Eastman Kodak CoObject supporting gyratory table
US3140347 *Mar 15, 1960Jul 7, 1964Isaac Cohen AaronApparatus for the projection of distorted images
US3318187 *Aug 20, 1965May 9, 1967Charles WashburnDisplay device and reflective elements therefor
US3473428 *May 31, 1966Oct 21, 1969Phillips Edward HEntertainment device
US3554537 *Sep 23, 1968Jan 12, 1971Edward H PhillipsTemplate projected images reflected and colored by asymmetrical bodies each having an optical reflecting lens
US3572919 *Mar 11, 1968Mar 30, 1971Wilson C HayesSound to light visual vocalization system
US3580126 *Oct 29, 1968May 25, 1971John F ForknerLight display instrument
US3590681 *Nov 27, 1968Jul 6, 1971Sonovision IncApparatus for producing a visual display
US3603195 *Jun 21, 1968Sep 7, 1971Edmund Scient CoMusic-responsive light display
US4010361 *Mar 3, 1975Mar 1, 1977Latterman Robert CLight deflection apparatus
US4814800 *Mar 16, 1988Mar 21, 1989Joshua F. LavinskyLight show projector
Classifications
U.S. Classification353/2, 273/145.00D, 359/617, 84/464.00R
International ClassificationG02B27/08
Cooperative ClassificationG02B27/08
European ClassificationG02B27/08