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Publication numberUS2412326 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1946
Filing dateDec 9, 1944
Priority dateDec 9, 1944
Publication numberUS 2412326 A, US 2412326A, US-A-2412326, US2412326 A, US2412326A
InventorsDupuy Charles F J
Original AssigneeCedar Corp N O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vaporizing device
US 2412326 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 10 1946. c, J UY 2,412,326

' VAPORIZING DEVICE Filed Dec. 9, 1944' Patented De'c. 10. 1946 VAPORIZING DEVICE Charles F. J. Dupuy, Mahwah, N. J., assignor to O-Cedar Corpn, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application December 9, 1944, Serial 0. 567,379

' 3 Claims. (01. 299-20) This invention relates to vaporizing device and more particularly to devices adapted for domestic use to vaporize perfumes, deodorants, disinfectants or the like.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide a vaporizing device which is extremely simple and inexpensive to manufacture and which will effectively vaporize various types of liquids. 7

Another object of the invention is to provide a vaporizing device in which the container for the liquid to be vaporized can easily be replaced without the necessity of replacing the entire device.

Still another object is to provide a vaporizing device in which the rate of vaporization may readily be controlled.

The above and other objects and advantages of the invention will be more readily apparent from the following description when read in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which- Figure 1 is a side elevation of a vaporizing device embodying the invention;

Figure 2 is a central section on the line 2-2 of Figure l; and

Figure 3 is a horizontal section on the line 33 of Figure 1.

The device comprises a tubular shell I which is preferably cylindrical and is opened at its top and bottom. The shell ID as will appear hereinafter may be a permanent unit not requiring replacement and, therefore, may be decorated or ornamented in any desiredmanner. The shell may be made of any desired material but is shown as formed of sheet metal and is provided adjacent its lower end with an inwardly turned bead II forming an internal annular flange spaced slightly above the bottom of the shell. The top of the shell is formed with an external flange or bead I2 to support a cover and is provided between the bead I2 and the upper edge of the shell with a series of spaced openings I3.

The shell is adapted to receive and support a container for liquid to be vaporized shown as a bottle I4 terminating at its top in a reduced threaded flange I5. A wick I6 is mounted in the container and as shown has an upper flat pad portion substantially filling the neck I with legs depending therefrom to the bottom of the container to feed liquid to the pad portion. The wick may be formed with one or more legs as shown and as more particularly described and claimed in my copending application, Serial No. 558,631, filed on October 20, 1944.

During shipment and storage the container I4 2 is adapted to be closed by a threaded cap I1 having threads rolled in its main body portion to engage with the threads on the neck I5 and terminating at its open end in a rolled bead I8 of greater external diameter than any other por-- tion of the cap. In use, the cap is removed from the bottle I4 and is dropped into the shell in inverted position as shown in Figure 2, so that the bead I8 will engage the bead II to support the cap in the shell. The bottle may then be placed in the shell above the cap with its bottom outer edge resting on the bead I8 and with its top open to expose the upper pad portion of the wick I6 to the interior of the shell. In the event it is desired to discontinue operation of the device, the cap I! may be replaced on the container, any possibility of loss being avoided by maintaining the cap in the shell at all times.

The level of liquid in the container I4 may be observed at all times thru vertically extending slots I9 formed in the opposite sides of the shell. By looking thru the slots I9 t0ward a source of light, an observer can easily determine the amount of liquid remaining in the container and can be informed when refilling or replacement of the container is necessary. When the container in use is empty, it may be removed from the shell and replaced by a new container filled with liquid without the necessity of replacing the shell.

In order to control the rate of vaporization a flanged cover 2| is provided for the shell having a downwardly turned flange 22 adapted to overlie the shell and to terminate adjacent the bead I2. The flange 22 is formed with a series of openings 23 of substantially the same size and spacing as the openings I3 in the shell so that as the cover 2i is turned, the openings I3 and 23 will be moved more or less into register to regulate communication between the interior of the shell and the atmosphere. For full vaporization the cover 2I may be removed from the top of the container and placed over the bottom of the container for convenience. At this time, the full area. of the wick I6 is exposed to the atmosphere and maximum vaporization will occur. For a slower rate of vaporization, the cover may be placed on the top of the container as shown and turned to regulate the effective size of the openings I 3.

While one embodiment of the invention has been shown and described in detail herein, it is to be understood that this is illustrative only and is not intended to be taken as definition of the this purpose to the appended claims.

What is claimed'is:

1. A vaporizing device comprising a tubular shell open at its ends and having an inwardly projectingubead adjacent its bottom, a container adapted to hold liquid to be vaporized fitting within the shell, 3, cap for the container having a bead adapted to rest on the bead in the shell with the major portion of the cap lying below the bead, and a wick in the container adapted to be exposed adjacent the top of the container.

2. A vaporizing device comprising a tubular shell open at its ends and having an inwardly projecting bead adjacent its bottom, a container adapted to hold liquid to be vaporized fitting within the shell, a cap for the container having a bead adapted to rest on the bead in the shell with the major portion of the cap lying below the bead, a wick in the container adapted to be ex- 4 posed adjacent the top of the container, and a flanged cover for the shell, the cover flange and the side wall of the shelladjacent the top being formed with spaced openings adapted to register more or less when the cover is placed over the top of the shell. I

3. A vaporizing device comprising a tubular shell open at its ends and having an inwardlyprojecting bead adjacent but spaced from its bottom, a container cap having a bead adapted to rest on the bead in the shell, a container resting upon said cap bead within said shell, and a, re-

movable closure for the top of said shell, said cap being removable through the upper part of said shell and adapted to' be placed upon said container to close the same when said container is placed upon the bead in said shell.

, CHARLES F. J. DUPUY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2522581 *Apr 19, 1947Sep 19, 1950Mohen John PHumidor for cigar and tobacco cases
US2549161 *Feb 9, 1950Apr 17, 1951Bishop John PCake moistener
US2733098 *Dec 7, 1953Jan 31, 1956 H holt
US2850321 *Jul 5, 1956Sep 2, 1958Hoffman Herbert EVaporizing devices
US4174808 *Oct 25, 1977Nov 20, 1979Edward LatinPool fountain
US4739928 *Mar 13, 1987Apr 26, 1988The Drackett CompanyAir freshener dispenser
US7325358 *Feb 1, 2006Feb 5, 2008Repelit LlcWeather protected deer and animal repellent container
US8677679 *Aug 31, 2010Mar 25, 2014Fmc CorporationAmpoule for the storage and dispersion of volatile liquids
US9173389 *Mar 14, 2013Nov 3, 2015Auburn UniversitySystems and methods to deliver and maintain volatile compounds
US9185897Mar 3, 2014Nov 17, 2015Auburn UniversityMethods to deliver and maintain volatile compounds
US9205163 *Jul 22, 2013Dec 8, 2015S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Volatile material dispenser
US9278151 *Nov 27, 2012Mar 8, 2016S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Volatile material dispenser
US9521836Dec 27, 2013Dec 20, 2016Willert Home Products, Inc.Scent-releasing apparatus and method of making same
US20110072711 *Aug 31, 2010Mar 31, 2011Fmc CorporationAmpoule for the storage and dispersion of volatile liquids
US20140145004 *Nov 27, 2012May 29, 2014Nathan R. WestphalVolatile Material Dispenser
US20140145005 *Jul 22, 2013May 29, 2014Nathan R. WestphalVolatile Material Dispenser
DE1093953B *Jul 7, 1953Dec 1, 1960Airkem IncAls Verdampfer und als Untersatz fuer Gegenstaende dienende Vorrichtung
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/51.5, 239/59
International ClassificationA61M11/00, A61M11/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61M11/04
European ClassificationA61M11/04