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Publication numberUS2412978 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 24, 1946
Filing dateFeb 14, 1945
Priority dateFeb 14, 1945
Publication numberUS 2412978 A, US 2412978A, US-A-2412978, US2412978 A, US2412978A
InventorsGeorge R Fish
Original AssigneeEdwards And Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Musical chime construction
US 2412978 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dc. 24, 1946. l G. R. FISH 2,412,978

MUS ICAL CHIME CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. 14, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet l Dec. 24, 1946.

G. R. FISH 2,412,978

MUSICAL CHIME CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. 14, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 4* C36 34- z/C/ /9 l 29a. Z4 24- INVENTOR Gfosf f?. F/SH WMTXW'DRNEY mentado. 24, 194e OFFICE MUSICAL CHIME CONSTRUCTION George R. Fish, Norwalk, Conn., asslgnor to Edwards and Company, Inc., Norwalk, Conn., a corporation of New York Application February 14, 1945, Serial No. 577,819

27 Claims. l

I'his invention relates to signalling devices, and more particularly to signals such as are employed at the front door of an apartment, or dwelling, or the like, and particularly to signalling devices that may sound one or more musical notes.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a simple and practical signalling device of the abovementioned character which will be inexpensive to fabricate and which will be of reliable action in practical use. Another object is to provide a signalling device of the above-mentioned character which may be made up of individual, relatively simple parts so as, in turn, to facilitate manufacture of such parts individually and to so construct the latter as to facilitate rapid and dependable assembly. Another object is to provide an audible signalling device in which a sounding element may be set into vibration by mechanism which will be easy to assemble and which will require minimum adjustment or checking upon completion of assembly to achieve the intended sound emission. Another object is to carry out this last-mentioned object in the fabrication of an audible signalling device in which two sounding elements are to be successively struck and set into sound-emitting vibration. Another object is, in general, to improve the construction of audible signalling devices, particularly of the kind where two sounding elements are to be energized, and other objects will be in part obvious lor in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention, accordingly, consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangements of parts as will be exemp'ied in the structure to be hereinafter described and Ithe scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which is shown illustratively one of the various possible embodiments of this invention,

Fig. l is a small-scale perspective View of a signailing device as it appears when mounted in position on one side of a wall, or partition, or door panel;

Fig. 2 is a front elevation of an actuating mechanism as it appears when mounted on the other side of a wall, partition, door panel, or the like;

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view as seen along the line 3-3 of Fig. 1, certain of the internal parts being shown in elevation and certain others partially in section in order to show certain struc tural features more clearly;

Fig. 4 is a vertical central sectional view as seen along the line 4-4 of Fig. 3; and

Fig. 5 is a transverse sectional view as seen along the line 5-5 of Fig. 3, while Fig. 6 is a fragmentary transverse sectional view as seen along the line 6-8 of Fig. 2, showing certain details of the actuating mechanism of Fig. 2.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

The construction, mounting, and action of the device can best be illustrated if it is considered that the device is mounted on the front door of an apartment, dwelling, or the like, it being noted that door panels vary in thickness, and, hence, I preferably construct the device in the form of two units, one of which, conveniently termed the signalling unit," and generally indicated in Fig. l by the reference character I0, is mounted upon the inside face of the door panel I I, and the other of which, conveniently termed the "actuating unit. and generally indicated in Figs. 2 and 5 by the reference character I2, is mounted on the outside face of the door panel II, the latter requiring only the drilling of a hole I3 therethrough to permit free passage of an operating shaft Il from the actuating unit on the outside to the signalling unit I0 on the inside face of the door.

The signalling unit comprises a base I5 preferably in the form of a sheet-metal stamping and peripherally flanged, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5, to give it strength and to rest against the inside face of the panel II to which it may be secured, as by screws I6. The base I5 is generally rectangular in shape, and adjacent its vertical edgesand, hence, laterally spaced from each otherare mounted two sounding elements I8 and I9 which can be of any suitable form or construction to emit suitable sound when set in vibration, and in the illustration, element-s I8 and I9 may be in the form of rectangular metal plates-sometimes called chime plates or bars-and where they are to emit a different note, they are of correspondingly different dimensions, as indicated or suggested in the drawings. They are suitably supported, each preferably at two spaced points which preferably coincide with internodes, and the two supports for each bar preferably include a suitable yieldable material, such as soft rubber, felt. or the like. to minimize interference with sound-emitting vibration. Since the mountings are preferably identical in construction, it will v suffice to describe only one of them in detail.

as by spot welding, indicated at 22, leaving an upstanding ear or leg 2l, which has cut and bent out of its plane a leg 2i bent over at its outer end, as is better shown in Fig. 3, thus to receive over the part 2I a. washer 24 o1' rubber, felt, or the like, which, throughout its center or middle periphery. contains a groove into which the metal of the sounding element ts when, in the course of mounting, the yieldable washer 2d is thrust through a suitable hole 2d provided in the sounding element for that purpose.

Hence, as better appears from Figs. 3 and 5, the two sounding elementsid and i9 are positioned in parallelism, each adjacent a vertical side edge of the'base i@ and thus providing ample space between them in which to accomodate mechanism about to be described. Fitted over the entire assembly, and secured in any suitable way (not shown) to the base i is a box-like cover 26, which thus completes the enclosure of the sounding elements and related mechanism,

and, due to suitable apertures 2l in the longitudinal side walls and positioned opposite the center portions of the sounding elements id and is,

the enclosure can, and docs, function as a resonator to improve the quality of sound emitted by the sounding elements.

Preferably I provide for the successive striking of the two sounding elements iii and id, and a single cycle of operations may thus comprise the striking irst of one and then of the other sounding element. To eiect suitable impact of a sounding element, I provide a striker, generally indicated by the reference character 29, and provide it with two opposed striking elements 29B and 29,

which are preferably made of a suitable wood, and arrange for the actuation of striker 29 so that striker element 29e nrst impacts sounding element i8 and element 29 then impacts sounding element IQ-each, however, in a manner to avoid damping of the vibrations of the struck sound element, even though the striker part or parts be made to come to rest. The striker 29 is actuated or carried by strained spring means adapted to assume either of two conditions and to undergo transition from one to the other with a snapaction, and preferably, and illustratively, the spring means takes the form of a at or leaf spring 3d, made of any suitable nat spring-steel; when made in iat or strip form, strip stock of spring material vmay be run through a simple punch-press operation to shape, pierce, and cut o the at spring element i3@ to give it tongues S and 30h at its respective ends and aligned along the longitudinal center line and to give it at its midpoint a hole 30 by which the mounting thereto of the striker part or parts may be eected.

The striker 29 preferably has some weight or mass to give it a suitable inertia when set into motion, and, hence, is preferably made of metal,

.conveniently in the form of two identical, cylindrical parts 29 and 29, each of which has a threaded hole extending along its axis; these parts will be seen to be capable of easy and inexpensive manufacture, as by way of a screw machine.

The parts 2S and 25d are secured each to one side or face of the dat spring 30, and preferably in a manner to reinforce and strengthen the spring at its mid-point where the hole 30 is, and, conveniently, parts 25 and 20d are made to function as clamping elements to tightly clamp the midportion of the iiat spring 30 bet-Wee!! them,

thus virtually precluding material ilexing along a transverse line through the hole 30 where, the spring 30 might otherwise be weakest. For this purpose I may employ a threaded headless stud or screw 8i which passes through the hole 30 in spring 30, and onto the ends projecting from either face of the spring 3 0 are threaded the parts. 20 vand 29d, each serving in eect as a nut for the other, thus clamping the midportion of the at spring 30 atwise between the adjacent flat faces oi parts 29 and 29, the diameter of which, as indicated in Fig. d, may closely approximate the Width of spring 30.

The threaded screw element 8i is of insuilicient length (see Fig. 3) to fully occupy the threadedv holes in the parts 20 and 20d, and into the unoccupied, opposite, end portions of these holes are threaded the striker elements 29 and 20", which, if made of wood, need not be preliminarily threaded, sincethe threads of the parts 25 and 29d, in eect, cut threads into the Shanks of the wooden striker elements and result in a tight or force iit. The striker elements E and 29 are thus dependably and securely mounted, one on each side of the flat spring 30, and substantially at its midpoint.

The iiat spring t@ has its upper end, as seen in Figs. 3 and d, supported in a resilient and yieldable mounting, generally indicated as a whole by the reference character 83, and has its lower end supported in a movable energy-transmitting mounting, generally indicated by the reference character 3Q, these mountings being constructed and spaced from each other in. relation to the length of the ilat spring Si@ so that the latter, in an at-rest position, as shown in Fig. 3, is bowed and, hence, tends always to assume a straight-line shape, this' latter tendency being utilized to'hold the striker out of contact with its nearest sounding element. Spring 30, -in thus trying to straighten out, eectively holds the striker element 20 out of engagement with sounding element i0, and, were it bowed in reverse direction by movement of the movable mounting Sd, and allowed toassume the at-rest position, as indicated in the dotted lines A, the other striker element 29e is, by the same tendency of the spring 30 to assume a straight-line position, held out of contact with the other sounding element i3. These respective positions thus insure that neither sounding element is damped after being struck.

The elastic or resilient mounting 83 may be of any suitable construction that is capable of yielding upwardly, as viewed in Fig. 3, when the spring 30 goes through the transition from one bowed position (for example, the full-line position B) to, and beyond, and back to, the dotted-line position A, and vice versa. Illustratively, and conveniently, the mounting 33 comprises a at spring 35, which may be of the same flat spring stock as is the spring 30, and it is suitably supported at its ends equally spaced from its midpoint, at which midpoint it has connection with the upper end of flat spring 30 to support the latter. Such connection conveniently comprises a slot 35a in the spring 35 large enough to receive, a bit loosely, the tongue 30" at the upper end of spring 30, and preferably the tongue 30 is of suicient length to permit interposing between the mounting spring 35 and the portions of fiat spring 30, to either side of the tongue 30, of a washer 36 which is preferably non-metallic and preferably also is of any suitable yieldable damping material, such as felt or rubber; it serves to aid the resilient action of the mounting spring 35 and makes for noiseless action as the iiat spring 35 snaps from one bowed position to the other, and vice versa.

Mounting spring 35 is preferably also given a resilient support from the base AI5 of the mechanism, and conveniently I employ two mountings, one at each end of spring 35, that are identical to the mountings or supports 2l that support each of the sounding elements I8 and I8 and are described above in detail, and, hence, these mountings or supports for spring 35 are identified by similar reference characters throughout. As mounting spring 35 partakes of different degrees of flexing throughout the action of the apparatus, the rubber washers or bushings 24, which extend through suitable holes adjacent the ends of the spring 35, yield appropriately, portions of them being normally under some degree oi' compression, and again the action is unhampered by friction-creating or noise-producing connections to the spring 35.

The movable mounting 34 comprises a socket to receive the lower end of spring and, conveniently, is in the form of a U-shaped socket 38 which may be stamped out of sheet metal, being pierced, as at 38, to provide a hole through which the tongue 35* of spring 30 projects, the other edge portion of spring 30 bottoming in the socket 38. The two side walls 38b and 38 of socket 35 may or may not, as desired, grip the spring 30 and preferably they are upwardly divergent, the parts 35b and 38 thereby forming in effect a twoarmed fork of which they are the two arms, as indicated in Fig. 3, thus also facilitating assembly thereto of spring 30.

Mounting 34 and, hence, its socket 38 are arranged for movement, preferably in a reversible direction, so as to stress the spring 30 in a manner to cause it to snap from one bowed condition into reverse-bowed condition. For example, a transverse movement (as viewed in Fig. 3) or a rotary twisting movement applied to the lower end of the spring may be employed for this purpose, and ln the illustrative embodiment I have shown an arrangement for utilizing both transverse motion of translation and a twisting motion as about a pivot; this I may achieve by causing the movement of socket 38 to take place along an arc of substantial radius.

Thus, the socket 38 may be secured to or formed integrally with a sheet-metal rocker 39 which is shaped or stamped to provide diametrically opposed arms 4I and 42 for a purpose later described, and suitable means are provided for rotatably supporting rocker 38, such as a hub 43, which may be at its right-hand end (Fig. 4) of reduced diameter to extend through a suitable hole in the rocker 39, the latter being rigidly secured thereto in any suitable manner, as by brazing, welding, or the like. Through the hub 43 extends a trunnion-forming member 44, preferably in the form of a tube, and secured thereto in any suitable way, as by a force iit, brazing, or the like. The tube 44 projects beyond the two ends of the hub 43, thus to provide trunnions, one of which-is rotatably supported in a hole I5 in the base plate I5 and the other of which is rotatably supported in a hole in a bracket 45 shaped as shown in'Figs. 3 and 4 and provided with a base portion 45 that rests atwise against the base plate I5 and is secured thereto in any suitable way.

Preferably base plate I5 is provided with spaced holes I5 and I5 (Fig. 3) to receive ears 45h and 45 which are integral with the base portion 45 and bent rearwardly; these parts may thus function, after the hub 43 with its rocker 38 is assembled to the back plate I5 by inserting the left trunnion of tube 44 through the hole I5", accurately to locate or position the bracket 45 as the latter is related to the right-hand trunnion of the tube 44, whence the base portion 45 is secured to the back plate I5, as by bending the ears 46b and 45 inwardly toward each other and against the rear face of the back plate I5. Preferably, also, one of the screws I5 that secures the device to the inside face of the panel II, passes through registering holes in the base portion 45 and in the back plate I5 (see Figs. 3 and 4), thus making for better security of assembly and mounting.

The left end of trunnion tube 44 (Fig. 4) has an end wall 44a which has a square hole 44b to receive the operating shaft I4, which is also square in cross-section, thus forming a dependable driving connection therebetween so that rotary movement given the drive shaft I4 is transmitted to the rocker 38 and socket 38.

The actuating unit I2 (Figs. 2 and 5) may take any suitable form to give the shaft or rod I4 the desiredl rotary movement, and preferably it is constructed to simulate in appearance a door knocker, and thus it may have a suitable escutcheon or base plate 48 secured to the panel I I, as by screws 49, and having pivotally mounted thereon a suitable arm or lever 50 provided with a finger or hand grip 50a of suitable configuration. The arm 50 may, therefore, be swung toward or away from the plate 48, and its movement about its pivot is arranged to be converted into rotary movement of the shaft I4.

Thus, for example, the square shaft or rod I4 (Fig. 5) may be turned down, as at I4, to provide a trunnion which is rotatably supported in a hole 48a in the base plate 48, and to the projecting portion of the trunnion I4a is secured, as by a pin (not shown), a miter or bevel gear 5I, the gear 5I and the shoulder at the righthand end of trunnion I4a holding the rod I4 assembled to the base plate 48 and holding it against axial displacement.

Projecting from the base plate 48, and integrally formed therewith, are two spaced ears or lugs 52 and 53, provided with holes to take a pivot pin or screw 54, and the under side of the upper end of the arm 50 is shaped, as by casting, stamping, milling, or the like, to provide two spaced ears 5I)b and 55, also having holes therein for the pin 54, and between which are the ears 52 and 53 of the base plate 48, thus completing :181e pivotal connection between the parts 50 and jecting part 5I!cl of the arm 50, and, in clockwise direction, by the upper end portion 50e, these parts coming into engagement with the mountf 7 ing plate Il according to the direction in which the arm 50 is swung.

The ratio of drive between segment 55 and gear i is such that the desired amount of limited swing of member 50 gives the shaft i4, and hence the rocker 39, a sulcient swing, Illustratively,

on the order of 60 degrees, to shift the movable support; 34 to eilect transition of the spring 8u from one bowed condition to a condition in which the bowing is reversed, as is later described. Preferably provision is made to eiiect return swing of the actuating arm t@ upon completion of its manual movement in one direction throughout its limited range, and for this purpose I preferably employ a spring et (Fig. 3) one end of which is connected to rocker arm di, which may be bent inwardly, as at die, for that purpose, and the other end of which is anchored to a lug de@ that is struck up out of the back plate l5. Spring 5@ is normally under tension to hold rocker 39 in the full-line position shown in Fig. 3, and, through the shaft ill and the gearing 5l and E5, spring 5@ thus holds the actuating lever 5@ (Fig. 5) in the position shown, and thus part 'dud can function to limit the extent to which 'spring 56 (Fig. 3) can swing the rocker in clockwise direction. This action may be supple mented by a lug 115i struck up out of the back plate i5 and positioned to be engaged by the lug tss which is formed by bending a portion of the rocker arm i2 rearwardly.

Swinging of the actuating lever 5@ (Fig. 5) in clockwise direction to the extent limited by the part 5de thus can give the rocker Se the maximum amount of swing in counter-clockwise direction (Fig. 3), thus to swing the combined forklike arms Seb and 35e and socket support 38 from the right-hand side of the axis of rocker 3d to the left-hand side thereof, and thus, also, further tensioning, or storing energy in, the spring 5t, so that release of the actuating lever 5@ permits the spring 5e to expend its stored energy and restore the parts to normal or starting position.

Companion to the lug lef is a lug idg, also formed by striking up a portion of the metal of the back plate d5, and spaced about 60 degrees from the lug idf. These lugs i5! and l5? serve to facilitate assembly of the mechanism in course of fabrication and to prevent disarrangement of the parts during shipment and also during the steps of assembling the actuating unit and the signalling unit to the respective sides of the door parel and to each other. For example, the lug i5! prevents the spring 56 from continuing rotary movement of the rocker 39 and socket 33 in clockwise direction to an extent that can withdraw the upper end tongue 30h from its retaining resilient support; with both lugs lef and lg, also, the flat spring 3Q, with its striker 29, may be assembled to both of its end supports, whether or not spring 5t is iirst put in position, for unintentional or accidental rotary movement of rocker 3@ in either direction and suicient to cause withdrawal of the upper end of the spring from its mounting cannot, therefore, take place. Also, these relationships facilitate assembly of the shaft le from the other side of the door panel to the bearing and driving shaft de, for the square hole in the latter is thereby heldin proper relation to receive the square shaft when the lever 5d is in its starting or normal position. Where the door panel li is thinner than that shown, the driving connection between the square shaft le and the driving tube 44 is still maintained, the two parte 8 l being telescopically related and any surplus length of shaft projects into the bearing tube M and may project beyond that to the extent of the front wall of the cover 26.

Because of the tendency of the at spring 30 to straighten out (Fig. 3), its lowerend portion engages the wall 38 of the socket 38 and tends vto apply a turning torque in counter-clockwise direction t0 the rocker 39, against the tension of vthe spring E6, and its upper end exerts force against the at spring-35, tending to bow it, the various parts assuming the full-line position shown in Fig. 3. As the rocker 39 is swung counter-clockwise by the drive shaft i4, the right-hand wall 3BG of socket 3d is pivoted into engagement with the lower portion of spring Bti, that lower end of the 'spring also moving upwardly and to the left in an arc, thus shortening the distance between the end supports of spring 30 and also bowing the upper supporting spring 35 still more, and, in eect, storing energy in both spring 38 and spring 35. Shortly after the socket 38 passes to the left o dead-center, spring 3@ assumes a shape somewhat as indicated in broken line C, whence the energy stored in the two springs Bil and 35 is about ready to be released, spring 3@ quickly snapping into the bowed shape indicated. at A, whence, aided by the inertia or energy of movement of the relatively heavy striker 2Q and aided by the tendency of supporting spring 35 to straighten out, the spring d@ is bowed to the left beyond the position A and the striker element 29a is, with substantial velocity, impacted against the sounding element id-all before the rocker arm e2 reaches the lug [(58. This speedy bowing beyond the position A is facilitated by vthe leeway allowed between the fork-like arms Seb and 38C of the socket 88, the right-hand arm 386 being in a pushing contact with the lower portion of spring 3i). Having struck the sounding element it, the striker 29 starts a rebound, aided by the tendency of spring 3d to again straighten out, and which tendency always acts in a direction to hold the striker away from the sounding element, or vice versa, so that damping of its vibrations does not take place.

' Should the actuating lever 5t be released upon the completion, or just prior to the completion, of its clockwise stroke, the energy stored in the spring 56 commences a reverse rotary movement of rocker 39 and also of drive shaft lll, and hence commences a return drive of the actuating lever 5G to normal or starting position; the socket support 38 now swings upwardly and to the right in an arc to start the bowing of the spring 3G in reverse direction, that is, from the shape or position A to the shape or position B. During this action, the left-hand arm 38h is in pushing contact with the lower portion of the spring 30. Just prior to the rocker arm l2 reaching the lug lf, and somewhat after the socket 38 has passed over dead-center, the spring 38, aided' by the straightening-out tendency of support spring 35, snaps into a bowed shape beyond (to the right) the full-line position B, aided by the energy of movement or inertia communicated to the relatively heavy striker 29, thus giving the other sounding element i9 a high velocity or sharp blow from which the striker rebounds, aided in the rebound by the tendency of spring .it to assume a straight-line relation. Under the eiect of spring 56, rocker'arm 42 thereafter and ultimately reaches the lug H51, as does also the part bild of the actuating lever 5l) reach the mountf ing plate 48 of the actuating unit.

It will be seen that the parts are so proportioned and interrelated that the spring Il, disregardlng for the moment the effect of spring 3l, assumes a normal bowed position, either A or B, in which the striker falls short of engagement with a sounding element and in which .the tendency of the spring. 30 itself, through either wall portion 38b or wall portion 38 of socket 38, controis or determines the corresponding rotary position of the rocker 39, and thus damping action on the chime bars is dependably precluded; the spring 30, in either position A or B, thus coacts, due to the kind of connection it has with the rocker 39, with either wall 38c or 38b to limit its own bowing beyond these respective positions, excepting as the momentum of the striker and the follow-up action of spring 33 carries the bowing of the spring beyond either of these positions for the purpose of striking a sounding element, the rebound, plus -the yielding of the spring 33 and Ithe yielding connection Itherewith of the upper end of the spring 3D, insuring quick withdrawal of the striker from the stricken vibrating element so as not to damp its vibration. Thus dependable musical action may be achieved.

The construction will be seen to be simple and inexpensive Ito fabricate and simple and easy to install, .the actuating unit being easily mounted on the outside of the partition or panel II and the signalling unit being readily mounted on the opposite face, interconnection being effected .through the shaft I4 of the actuating unit which passes through a hole I3 easily drilled through the partition (Fig. 5); as better appear in Figs. 4 and 5, the apparatus will be seen to be readily accommodated to panels or partitions of different thicknesses, the telescopic relation between the shaft I 4 and the part 44 permitting wide variation of the spacing between the two units, and the space to the right (in Fig. 4) of the sleeve 44 being unobstructed so that a substantial portion of the shaft I4 may project thereinto inthe event that the panel I I is very thin.

It will thus be seen that there has been provided in this invention a signalling device in which the various objects above noted, together with many thoroughly practical advantages, are successfully achieved.

As many possible embodiments may be made of the above invention and as many changes might be made in the embodiment above set forth, it is to be understood that all matter hereinbefore set forth or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. A signalling device having spaced sounding elements, striker means therefor, means mounting said striker means between said sounding elements for movement in directions first to strike one element and then the other, said mounting means comprising a flat spring supporting said striker means substantially at its midpoint and two spaced mountings supporting said spring at its ends and spaced apart by a distance shorter than the length of the spring whereby the spring is bowed, and a rocker carrying one of said mountings to move it and the spring end supported by it substantially in an arc and thereby increase the bowing of the spring and flex the end of the spring in a direction to reverse its bowed position and cause said striker means to be suddenly impacted against a sounding element.

2. A signalling device as claimed in claim 1, in which the mounting for the other end of .the flat 10 spring comprises resilient means that yields upon said rocker being actuated in a direction to increase the bowing of the spring and thereby has energy stored in it whereby said resilient means adds force to the impact or said striker means.

3. A signallingdevice as claimed in claim 1, in which the mounting carried by said rocker has a mechanical, reversibly-acting connection with .the end of the spring supported thereby whereby either may transmit turning torque .to the other, the transmission of turningtorque by the rocker to the spring end being eective to flex the spring end as aforesaid, and the spring, upon comple- .tion of the impact, assumes a bowed at-rest position and 'said connection acts to tend to hold said rocker in a position dependent upon the bend in the spring due to said at-rest bowed position.

4. A signalling device asl claimed in claim l, in which one of said mountings for the spring ends comprises socket-like means providing at least two spaced elements between which the spring end is received.

5. A signalling device asv claimed in claim 1, in which the spring lends and said mountings therefor have respective coacting parts forming detachable connections.

6. A device as claimed in claim l, in which the mounting carried by said rocker comprises two elements spacedvapart by a distance greater than the thickness of the spring end for engagement therewith, respectively, at the beginning and end of a working stroke of said rocker.

7. A signalling device as claimed in claim l, in which the mounting for the other end of the said spring comprises cushioning means and spring vmeans supporting said cushioning means and yieldable as Said rocker operates upon said spring.

8. A signalling device having spaced sounding elements, striker means therefor, means mounting said striker means between said sounding elements for movement in directions first to strike one element and then the other, said mounting means comprising a fiat spring supporting said striker means substantially at its midpoint and two spaced mountings supporting said spring at its ends and spaced apart by a distance shorter than the length of the spring whereby the spring is bowed in a direction to position the striker adjacent to but out of contact with one of said sounding elements, and reversibly-acting means operating upon one of said spring end mountings Ito ex the spring end supported thereby in 0pposite direction and thereby reverse the bowing of the spring and effect impact of said'striker means against the other sounding element.

9. A signalling device having spaced sounding elements, striker means therefor, means mounting said striker means between said sounding elements for movement in directions first to strike one element and then the other, said mounting means comprising a flat spring supporting said striker means substantially at its m dpoint and two spaced mountings supporting said spring at its ends and spaced apart by a distance shorter than the length of the spring whereby the spring is bowed in a direction to,l position the striker means at one of said sounding elements and spaced away from the other, and reversibly-acting means operating upon one of said mountings to move it in a direction to stress said spring to reverse its bowed position with substantially a snap action and thereby impact said other sounding element.

10. A signalling device comprising two spaced sounding elements, a bowed spring-having spaced supports by which said spring is supported in bowed condition, reversibly-acting means coacting with said spring and adapted upon actuation to reverse the bowing of the spring, and striker means actuated'by said spring and, in response to reversals in bowing thereof, to impact said sounding elements.

11. A signalling-device comprising a sounding element, a at spring carrying a striker substantially at its midpoint, two spaced supports for the vends of said spring,- one of which supports comprises two spaced members between which the spring end is received, and means mounting said one support for reversible movement in substantially an arc and thereby vary the distance of said support from the other support, said spring being bowed either toward or away from said sounding element according to the direction of movement of said one support along said arc and coacting through said spaced members to substantially limit movement of said one support along said arc.

12. A signalling device comprising a sounding element, a at spring carrying a striker substantially at its midpoint, two spaced supports for the ends of said spring, one of which supports comprises two spaced members between which the spring end is received, means mounting said one support for reversible movement in substantially an arc and thereby-vary the distance of said support from the other support, said spring being bowed either toward or away from said sounding element according to the direction of movement of said one support along said arc and coasting through said spaced members to substantially limit movement of said one support along said arc, the length of said spring and the spacing between said supports when the spring is bowed toward the sounding element being proportioned so that said striker is adjacent said sounding element but out of contact therewith, and means whereby, when said movable support eiects transition of said spring to bow it toward the sounding element, said striker is carried beyond said out-of-contact position to impact the sounding element and'immediately after impact assumes said out-of-contact position.

13. A signalling device as claimed in claim 12, in which said last-mentioned means comprises means resiliently mounting one of the supports of said spring whereby said support follows up the spring end supported by it when the spring bows beyond said out-of-contact 4position in impacting said sounding element.

14. A signalling device as claimed in claim 12, in which said last-mentioned means comprises means of substantial weight carried substantially a1; the midpoint of said spring to be given sucient inertia to bow the spring beyond said out-ofcontact position on the impacting stroke of the striker.

15. A signalling device comprising a sounding element, a bowed spring having spaced supports by which said spring is supported in bowed condition, means for applying force to said spring to cause it to reverse its direction of bowing, and striker means actuatedby said spring to strike said sounding element.

16. A signalling device comprising two spaced sounding elements, a spring capable of being reversibly bowed, spaced supports by which said spring is supported in bowed condition, one of said supports having resilient means mounting it for yieldable movement toward or away from the l2 other support, reversible means coacting upon actuation to reverse the bowing of the spring, and striker means operating in response to reversals in bowing of said spring to impact said sounding elements.

17. A signalling device comprising two spaced sounding elements, a spring capable of being reversibly bowed, spaced supportsby which said spring is supported in bowed condition, means operating upon said spring through one of said supports to strain the spring to effect reversal of its bowing, and striker means inpacting said sounding elements in response to reversals in bowing of said spring.

18. A signalling device comprising two spaced sounding elements, a spring capable of being reversibly bowed, spaced supports by which said spring is supported in bowed condition, one of said supports being movable and being constructed and operating in response to'movement thereof to apply a flexing force to the spring, means mounting said movable support for movement in successive reversed strokes, and striker means impacting said sounding elementsin response to bowing of said spring.

19. A signalling device for mounting on a panel, wall, or the like, comprising a signalling unit adapted to be mounted on one face of the panel and having a sounding element and striker means therefor and means including a rotary element for actuating said striker means, and an actuating unit adapted to be mounted on the other side of the panel and comprising a support having pivotally mounted thereon a lever for movement toward or away from the support, a rotary shaft having a bearing in said support and extending rearwardly therefrom and adapted to pass through a hole in said panel for coaction with said rotary element, said shaft having a gear-like member exposed between said base and said lever and said lever having a rack for actuating said gear-like member.

l2.0. A signalling device having spaced sounding elements, striker means therefor, means mountingsaid striker means between said sounding elements for movement in directions rst to strike one element and then the other, said mounting means comprising a at spring supporting said striker means substantially at its midpoint and two spaced mountings supporting said spring at its ends and spaced apart by a distance shorter than the length of the spring whereby the spring is bowed in a direction to position the striker means at one of said sounding elements and spaced away from the other, and means reversibly moveable in a direction substantially transverse to a line connecting said two spaced mountings for applying force to said spring to stress the spring to reverse its bowed position with substantially a snap action and thereby impact said other sounding element.

21. A signalling device comprising two spaced sounding elements, a bowed spring having spaced supports by which said spring is supported in bowed condition, means reversibly moveable in a direction substantially transversely of a line joining said spaced supports for stressing said spring out of its bowed condition and thereby reverse the bowing of said spring, and striker means actuated by said spring and, in response to reversals in bowing thereof, to impact saidsounding elements.

22. A signalling device comprising two spaced sounding elements, a bowed spring having spaced supports by which said spring is supported in angers `13 bowed condition, a reversibly actuatable rocker having two spaced elements alternatively engageable with said spring to stress it out of bowed condition and thereby reverse the bowing of the spring. and striker means actuated by said spring.

and, in response to reversals in bowing thereof, to impact said sounding elements.

23. A signalling device comprising two spaced sounding elements, a bowed spring having spaced supports by which said spring is supported in bowed condition, a member for applying torce to the convex side of the bowed spring to strain the spring to `assume a reversed bowed condition, a member for applying force to the convex side oi' the spring when in reverse bowed condition to strain the spring to assume its initial bowed condition, means moveably mounting said two members and for actuating them successively in spring-straining direction, and striker means actuated by said spring and, in response to reversals in bowing thereof, to impact said sounding elements.

24. A signalling device as claimed in claim 16 in which said reversible means comprises means for applying, at spaced points lengthwise of said spring, forces acting in substantially opposite directions to thereby twist the spring in a direction to reverse its bowed condition.

25. A signalling device comprising two spaced sounding elements, a spring capable of being reversibly bowed, spaced supports by which said spring is supported in bowed condition, one of said supports having resilient means mounting it for yieldable movement toward or away from the other support, reversible means coacting upon actuation to apply force to the bowed spring on the convex side thereof to stress it to reverse the bowing of the spring, and ing in response to reversals in bowing of said spring to impact said sounding elements.

26. A signalling device vas claimed in claim 15 in which said force-applying means comprises means for applying a spring-ilexing force to the spring to iiex it in a direction to reverse its direction oi bowing with a snap action and means operating to apply a force of compression to the spring in the direction of its length to increase the snap action with which the spring reverses its direction of bowing.

27. A signalling device as claimed in claim l5 in which said iorce-applyingmeans comprises a fork-like means having two spaced arms between which said spring extends and means movably mounting said fork-like means for movement in reversible strokes in a direction substantially transversely of a line joining said spaced supports for effecting successive reversals in the direction of bowing of said spring.

GEORGE R. FISH.

striker means operatt

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2463832 *Sep 17, 1947Mar 8, 1949Edwards And Company IncDoor signal device
US2465655 *Nov 2, 1946Mar 29, 1949Edwards & Company IncAudible signaling device
US2472371 *Dec 21, 1945Jun 7, 1949EdMusical chime signal construction
US2472372 *Dec 21, 1945Jun 7, 1949Edwards and CompanyMusical chime signal construction
US2472373 *Dec 21, 1945Jun 7, 1949Edwards and CompanyMusical chime signal construction
US2549157 *Mar 16, 1946Apr 17, 1951Auth Electrical Specialty CoAudible signaling device
US2750920 *Sep 8, 1952Jun 19, 1956Tall MurryDoor chime and wicket mechanism
US3012538 *Jul 31, 1959Dec 12, 1961Michael RosemanActuation means for signalling devices
US3028830 *Mar 23, 1959Apr 10, 1962Rca CorpUltrasonic transmitter mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification116/172, 116/141, 116/DIG.310, 116/DIG.300, 84/404
International ClassificationG10K1/072
Cooperative ClassificationY10S116/31, Y10S116/30, G10K1/072
European ClassificationG10K1/072