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Publication numberUS2413109 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 24, 1946
Filing dateApr 11, 1941
Priority dateApr 11, 1941
Publication numberUS 2413109 A, US 2413109A, US-A-2413109, US2413109 A, US2413109A
InventorsBruno Garni, Eugene Leipold
Original AssigneeBruno Garni, Eugene Leipold
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for the manufacture of building blocks
US 2413109 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 24, 1946. LE|PQLD r 2,413,109

APPARATUS FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF BUILDING BLOCKS Filed April 11, 1941 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Z" mvsmon EUGENE 1.51m

ATTORNEYS BLOCKS 1946- E. LEIPOLD ETAL TUBE OF BUILDING APPARATUS FOR THE MANUFAC Filed April 11, 194] 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 L D s Rm W Z M v 6 y, me a EN 5 up. 55%

Patented Dec. 24, 1946 APPARATUS FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF BUILDING BLOCKS Eugene Leipold and Bruno Garnl, Milwaukee, Wis.

Application April 11, 1941, Serial No. 388,008

Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in apparatus for the manufacture of building blocks. This is a continuation in part of our application 224,964 flied August 15, 1938, and entitled Building blocks.

It is the primary object of the present invention to provide a novel and improved apparatus for the manufacture of building blocks of concrete, preferably ornamentally faced, which will have the requisite hardness without requiring that each block be left to harden in the mold in which it is formed.

In the past, the manufacture of concrete building blocks has presented a dilemma. For proper setting of the cement used in the construction of such blocks to produce a satisfactorily hard and waterproof block, it is necessary to use a very considerable amount of water. Where the amount of water used is adequate it has not been possible to remove the form from the block and consequently the number of forms required to make blocks in any substantial quantities has been prohibitively large. On the other hand, if the mix was made sufiiciently dry to permit the form to be removed. the block would neither be satisfactorily hard nor waterproof. The present invention solves the problem of manufacturing a light weight, very hard, and very waterproof block, preferably of cinder concrete, through the use of the novel apparatus and method hereinafter to be disclosed.

Another important object of the invention has to do with the surfacing of the block. In accordance with the present invention the sides of the form are removed from the freshly cast mix, leaving the block standing on the bottom board or pallet. In accordance with the preferred practice of the invention, that portion of the block immediately adjacent the pallet is made with an ornamental aggregate which gives to the finished block face the appearance of cut stone. In the prior art much difficulty has been experienced due to adhesion between the finished surface of the block and the pallet, with the result that it has been common practice in the prior art to finish the top face rather than the bottom face of the block. For many reasons this is unsatisfactory and we have found in the present invention a satisfactory means of finishing the bottom face of the block without any adhesion of such face to the pallet and without any of the difllculties heretofore experienced in this connection.

Other important objects of the invention have to do with the simplification and improvement of the forms used in the manufacture of concrete blocks and in vibrating machines with which said forms interact during the casting of the blocks. It is our purpose to provide novel and improved forms each including integrally connected side and end walls separable from other side and end wall units at diagonally opposite comers of the block and readily adaptable for the production of blocks of difiering sizes and shapes by merely supplementing the basic forms used for the production of all blocks. Thus, we are able to make standard blocks, corner blocks, half blocks, and quarter blocks, all in the same fundamental apparatus.

It is our further purpose to provide a novel and improved organization in which the forms and the mix therein contained may be subjected momentarily to vibration during the casting of successive blocks by an arrangement in which each form and its contents may be lowered momentarily onto a surface which is in continuous vibration.

A further object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved apparatus for completing the manufacture of each block by washing the face thereof and removing a superficial coating which is deliberately made non-hardening in accordance with the method hereinafter to be disclosed.

Another object is generally to simplify and improve the construction, arrangement and operation for one or more of the purposes mentioned, and still other objects will be apparent from the specification.

In the drawings:

Fig. l is a view in front elevation of apparatus used in the molding of concrete blocks.

Fig. 1a is a detail view of one of the vibrating weights as it appears in side elevation.

Fig. 2 is a view in side elevation of a portion of Fig. 1 as it appears in the sectionindicated at 2-2 in Fla. 1.

Fill. 3 is a plan view of the block washing apparatus.

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of the apparatus shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a view in perspective showing a completely assembled form for the production of standard blocks.

Fig. 6 is a view in perspective showing in partially separated relations. several of the component parts of the form illustrated in Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary detail in perspective showing the introduction of auxiliary parts into a form such as that illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6 to produce a finished end on the block to be cast in such a form.

Fig. 8 is a view in perspective of a standard block such as may be cast in the form of Fig. 5.

Fig. 9 is a view in perspective of a comer block such as may be cast in a form of the type shown in Fig. '7.

Like parts are identified by the same reference characters throughout the several views.

In accordance with the present invention the side and end form structures shown in Figs. 5, 6, and '7 are assembled upon a succession of pallets in corresponding to the number of blocks which will be in process at any given time. Each pallet comprises a board preferably provided with cleats at II. The face of each pallet is preferably marked out in any desired pattern with ribs I! which form in the completed block grooves simulating mortar Joints between dressed stone blocks. The preferred practice of the invention produces a block having an ornamental face of differing colors or textures or both, so that a wall made of the improved blocks closely simulates a wall of natural dressed stone.

Removably associated with each of a succession of pallets, are the form members best shown in Figs. 5 and 6. These are identical with each other and each comprises an end plate It welded or otherwise integrally joined to a single side plate IS. The end plate I5 is made to extend transversely of the pallet in while the side plate I5 is flush therewith. Welded to the under surface of side plate It is an angle arm I! which abuts the side of the pallet and is provided with a finger at l8 for resting on top of the pallet to support in a horizontal position that end of the side plate It which is not connected with the end plate ii to receive support therefrom.

Each of the end plates l5 has welded to its outer face a finger l9 receivable into a notch 20 at the end of side plate ii of the co-operating identical unit to assure proper registration. A block at 2| on the free end of each side plate It engages about the outer surface of the contiguous end plate as shown in Fig. 5 to sustain the outward thrust of the contents of the mold.

Each of the end plates is provided at 22 with outstanding ears on its outer face. Pivoted between such ears is a latch lever 23 to the end of which is swivelled a cam 24 having an operating handle 25. The lever 23 is received into a notch 26 in the end of the side plate i6 of the adjoining unit, thereby bringing the cam into registry with the outer surface of such unit so that manipulation of the cam lever 25 will result in drawing the end of each form unit into close fitting pressure engagement with the contiguous side of the co-operating unit.

As clearly shown in Fig. 5, the two cams 24 located at diagonally opposite corners of the resulting mold, securely anchor the co-operating units together to provide a continuous mold upon the pallet l whereof each unit furnishes one side and one end.

The end plates ii of the mold units are normally provided with inserts 30 which are held thereto by screws 3| to mold the recesses in the ends of the building block. When it is desired to make a corner block. one or both of these inserts 3|! may be completely removed and the parts shown in Fig. '7 may be substituted. Immediately adjacent the end wall i is an inserted plate 32 to provide the finished surface for molding the smooth end of a corner block. The plate 32 is provided with laterally depending fingers 4 83 which extend over the side walls of the mold and engage in. the grooves I4 thereof.

In order to permit a different min to be inserted at the end face of the block from that used to make up the body thereof, a partition plate I! is introduced, this plate having similar fingers at ll receivable into the groove Tl in the respective side plates of the mold units near the ends thereof.

Each of the side plates it of the form units above described, is provided with three openings at lll which are of elongated form and mounted at their ends as clearly shown in Figs. 6 and '7. In the assembled form. units the openings of the respective side plates are directly opposite each other. Into these opposite openings we introduce from the exterior of the mold a set of core forms 40 which are preferably identical and fit closely to the margins of the side plates it about such openings. Each of the core forms I may comprise a hollow can of metal having a cross section accurately corresponding to the shape of the openings 38 into which it is receivable, as shown in Fig. 5. Secured across the ends of the several cams is a bar I having a handle 42 by means of which the several core forms may be manipulated as a single unit.

In accordance with the method hereinafter to be described, we provide for the vibration of the mix in the forms. Upon a frame comprising any suitable number of legs 44 connected by stretchers 45, we mount one or more tables 46 connected by stretchers 41. Cushions of rubber or the like at 8 permit the table or tables 48 to vibrate freely with respect to the frame. To hold the table structures to the frame while accommodating such vibration, we provide guide openings at I! and 50 for rods 5| upon which compression springs 52 and I3 engage stretcher 41 of the table, thereby holding the table upon cushion l8 while accommodating vibratory movement of the table.

Each table 46 may comprise simply a plank disposed transversely between the stretchers l1 and provided on its under surface with bearings at 8| for vibrating shaft 55 upon which a weight 56 is eceentrically disposed. When the shaft 55 is driven by pulley 51 from motor 58, the eccentrio mounting of the weight 56 produces the desired vibration of the table 46.

The vibration, if too extensive, will tend to disintegrate the apparatus. If too fine (occurring within limits unduly narrow), it will not produce the desired result. Therefore, while the specific factors are not critical, there is a critical range within which the rate of rotation, the mass of the eccentric, and the eccentricity of such mass, must be kept in relation to the load to be vibrated. In practice, we provide on each shaft 55 two eccentrics, each adjustable as to its eccentricity upon shaft 55 and determine their correct position by trial and error. In our commercial apparatus, shaft 55 is rotated at approximately 3600 R. P. M. and each eccentric 56 comprises a pair of disks BBI and 582 which are 6 in diameter and thick. Each is provided with an arbor ofl' center and each disk is provided with an arcuate slot as shown at 563 in Fig. la. A bolt 584 passing through registering portions of the arcuate slots of the respective disks, holds them in any desired position of relative angular adjustment about shaft 55. If the two disks are completely in registry, their eccentricity will be cumulative. If they are offset at degrees, their eccentricity will be wholly neutralized and balanced. At some intermediate point the desired vibrating effect will be produced in such a degree that it will not be destructive of the apparatus and yet will not be so fine that the material will not be packed in the molds. In actual practice disks of the character described have been set at such relative positions as to be rela tively oil'set angularly approximately 70".

In referring to the use of two such disks on each shaft 55, we have reference to a commercial machine in which molds and their contents are being vibrated at each end of the table plank 48 upon which shaft I is mounted. Naturally, where two composite disks are used on the shaft the pairs of plates comprising the two disks will normally be adjusted to the same angular offset so that their net eccentric effect will be alike.

Similarly, if other table planks 4B and other shafts 55 are mounted on the same structures H, the net vibrating eifect of the eccentric weights used thereon should be synchronous and cumulative so that the weights will not work against each other.

The table It has arms 60 projecting from the stretcher 41 in mutually spaced relation as clearly appears from Fig. 1 and Fig. 2. Between such arms is a pedestal 6| having a base plate 62 securely fixed to the floor. The pedestal preferably comprises an upright channel provided internally with cross webs at 63 and 54 apertured to provide bearings in which is guided a post 65 supported in a, normally elevated position determined by a stop 66 at its lower end, the post being biased to said upper normal position by strong tension springs 61 best shown in Fig. 1. Projecting laterally from post 65 is a foot pedal 68 which may be depressed by the operator at will to lower the post in the pedestal SI.

On the upper end of post 65 is a head comprising a cross bar 69 and parallel supporting members which are receivable beneath the pallets ill to hold each successive pallet and the form assembled thereon in a suitable position for filling such form with mix. To facilitate the filling operation we preferably provide a superstructure at 16 carrying a hopper 11 having a 46 discharge spout at 18 which immediately overlies a form supported by the arms at the upper end of post 65. Mix is delivered into the hopper, in actual practice, by a conveyor belt 19 and the operator is able to control the delivery 60 glass will usually be in of such mix into the mold at the spout 18.

After the block has been molded and set and the forms have been removed, its face is washed for reasons which will be made apparent hereinafter in connection with a more specific description of the method of manufacture. The apparatus employed for washing the block is shown in Figs. 3 and 4. A turntable 8|) is mounted on a vertical shaft 8| driven by worm gear 82 and worm gear 83 to rotate slowly. The turntable an is of suflicient size to receive, without crowding, adjacent its periphery, four separate blocks, consecutive blocks being at right angles to each other as indicated by the three blocks illustrated in Fig. 3. The space at 84 which is vacant in Fig. 3 65 represents a station from which completed blocks are removed and to which blocks requiring washing are applied to the table.

Behind the table is a column 85 carrying a' cross shaft 86 power driven by pulley 88. Bevel 7o gearing at 89 (Fig. 3) transmits motion from this cross shaft to a vertical shaft 90 which operates a worm gear 8| on the shaft 82 to drive the worm 62 previously referred to.

A pair of arms ll pivoted to the column II substantially co-axially with the cross shaft Ill, carry the brush shafts ll driven by belts 91 from the cross shaft l6 and carrying brushes 88. Each of the arms II has a nut intermediate its end in which there is threaded a screw 88 bearing against a projection III] of the column as a means of determining the height of the arm and the degree of pressure engagement of the respective brushes 88 with the work passing therebeneath on turntable 8B.

Supplied with water by the hoses Ill are the flushing nozzles I02, each of which preferably has a plurality of orifices directed upon the brushes 88 and the work.

Our improved method of manufacturing building blocks is as follows:

The face of each pallet, immediately prior to its use, is painted with a preparation which retards or prevents the setting of the cement immediately contiguous to the pallet face without destroying the smoothness of the block resulting from contact of the mix with the pallet face. In practice this preparation may be applied with a brush. While various materials may be employed, we have used satisfactorily a mixture made by adding to 15 gallons of boiling water and 40 pounds of glue dissolved therein, pounds of slaked lime. This preparation retards but does not completely prevent the setting of the cement. Its consistency is about that of paint when applied.

The form units each comprising one side and one end of the complete form, are now assembled upon the pallet and clamped together. The pallet and form units are placed upon the head supports 15 carried by the vertically retractible post above the vibrating table 46 as shown in Fig. 2.

For a rough block it would be possible immediately to fill the form with concrete. However, assuming that it is desired to produce an ornamental block having facing areas of slightly diflering colors or textures or both, the procedure is as follows:

The facing materials are previously mixed. As an aggregate we have successfully used separately and in combination, crushed granite, marble, limestone, and glass, together with cement coloring and marble dust. The crushed stone and the form of small chips. Three parts of such an aggregate are mixed with one part of cement, either light or dark or both, according to the color of facing desired. Two or three different colors of mix may be used in the 65 facing of a single building block.

To make up the mix for facing the block, 1 bags of the aforesaid aggregate are mixed with a half bag of cement and 2 gallons of water. A separate batch of this character is required for each separate color to be used.

We provide suitable masks for each of the areas delineated by the sides of the form units and the ribs 12 on the face of the pallet. In the disclosed structure there are three such areas at I05. I05 and Ill! respectively, (Figs. 6 and 7). A mask to fit each area may readily be made of a piece of wood or other material, at least as thick as the ribs l2 and accurately fitted into the appropriate area. With two such areas covered by suitable masks the third area is filled with facing material to the desired depth, which is preferably greater than the thickness of the ribs i2. Then one of the masks is removed and the second area is filled with facing mix of desired color to a like depth. The last mask is then removed and the 7 third area is filled with facing mix of desired color to the same depth.

As soon as all of the facing material has been introduced into the mold, the operator immedlately steps on the pedal 68 and lowers the pallet into contact with the arms ill of the vibrating table for anextremely short period which, in actual practice, is only a matter of two or three seconds. Thereupon the foot pedal 68 is released immediately and the springs 61 again elevate the mold out of contact with the vibrating table to the position shown in Fig. 2.

The core forms Ill are now introduced to span the mold transversely as shown in Fig. 5, and the mold is filled with cinder concrete mix. Some of the mix may be introduced before the core forms are inserted, if desired. The cinder concrete mix we preferably use employs an aggregate made up of cinders, both large and small, and limestone dust, mixed with cement in the ratio of ten parts of cinders and dust to one part of cement. Each batch of mix uses 10 bags of the aforesaid aggregate and 1 bag of cement to 7% gallons of water. The limestone dust is omitted in making small size blocks but is preferably used in making 12" blocks or larger. Blast furnace slag may be used to replace the cinders.

The above proportions, while not extremely critical, are nevertheless somewhat critical if the best results are desired. The proportions may be varied within certain limits according to the nature of the materials used. A specific example has been given for the reason that those skilled in the art will appreciate that the batch above described will produce a mix which is too soft for use in accordance with prior art practices to permit immediate removal of the mold. If such a mix is merely introduced into the mold and treated in the customary manner with or without tamping, and the sides of the mold are removed immediately from the pallet, the mix is so soft that it will slough, or sag, or collapse in most instances. However, in accordance with our improved method no such difficulty is experienced. During the filling of the mold with the mix, the pedal 68 is depressed by the operator to lower the filled mold onto the arms ill of the vibrating table and the pallet is allowed to remain in contact with the table for a matter of only a few seconds, or until the mold is completely filled. In practice, only twelve to eighteen seconds is required to fill the mold and no additional period of vibration is necessary.

While the specific time interval is not extremely critical, it is critical in the sense that if the vibration is either too fine in degree or too short or too long as to time, the material will not pack in such a manner as to permit immediately removal of the forms from the cast block. The object is to introduce into the mix as much water as possible so as to provide proper moisture for the complete set of the cement to produce a hard block having desired waterproof characteristics. With water present in the approximate amounts indicated in the above formula, it has already been noted that without vibration, or if the vibration is inadequate in degree or time, the soft concrete mix will sag when the forms are removed. With the proper amount of vibration both in degree and in time there will be no sagging and each block will be perfect. However, if the vibration is too much prolonged, instead of firmly packing the mix, it will ultimately separate out the water to produce an excess of water in certain portions of the block, with the result that sagging will again occur. There is, therefore, a moderately critical relation between the amount of water used and the extent and time of vibration. The extent of vibration could be diminished or the time could be greatly increased or greatly reduced if less water were used but, as already stated, inadequate water does not permit proper setting of the cement and therefore a major achievement of the present invention consists in the use of greater quantities of water than had heretofore been possible to use where the form was disassembled immediately after the casting of the block.

For convenience in description, we designate mixtures containing the above described water content as "wet-plastic mixtures," to distinguish them from those above described as being too dry or too wet.

The pallet is immediately removed from the head post 65 and the mold units are immediately released by manipulation of the cam levers 25 and are thereupon promptly taken from the molded block which, still mounted on its pallet, is stored for curing.

The vibration has brought all portions of the mix into intimate contact with the pallet and the form and, apparently through the mechanical interaction of the particles, their adhesion to each other is so enhanced by the vibration that a mix too soft to stand immediate form removal without vibration is so stable as readily to permit of form removal following vibration of the prescribed character.

Where the cover plates 30 are used at the ends of the forms as shown in Figs. 5' and 6, the finished block will have recesses 300 in the conventional manner. Its face will have a relatively solid finish ply at H0 scored with grooves l I I and I I! produced by the ribs ii on the pallet. The various areas defined by such grooves will, in practice, preferably be slightly difierent in color or texture or both, as above described. The body of the block at Iii will preferably be relatively light in weight, being preferably made of cinder or slag concrete. It will have the conventional openings at 6 provided by the core forms Ml.

Where a corner block is desired, as shown in Fig. 9, at least one of the end forms 30 will be removed and the plates 32 and 35 shown in Fig. '1 will be substituted. The plate 32 provides the finished end surface at H3. The procedure involves the filling of the form with rough cinder concrete mix, followed by the introduction of the finish mix into the space between plates 32 and 35 followed, finally, by the withdrawal of plate 35 whereby the continued vibration to which the block is subject during the filling operation, intimately unites the finish coating at H8 with the cinder concrete body 5 to produce the structure shown in Flg. 9. It will be noted that plate 35 does not extend to the pallet Hi5, thus permitting the union of the end finish coating H8 with the finish coating previously deposited on the pallet.

Due to the mixture of glue and lime with which the pallet has been painted, the surface portion of the mix which would otherwise adhere to the pallet, is precluded from setting during the period required for the curing of the body of the block. Consequently the block will be hard and dry enough to remove from the pallet while its surface contiguous to the pallet is still soft. This makes the pallet easy to clean in preparation for further use, and it facilitates removal or the block from the pallet with no tendency to destroy the finished surface of the block. It is, however, necessary or desirable to remove from the otherwise completed block that surface portion which still remains soft. This is done on the machine shown in Figs. 3 and 4.

As above explained, a workman loads the turntable 80 at station 84 and the slow rotation of the turntable counter-clockwise as viewed in Fig. 3, brings each successive block first beneath one of the brushes 98 where it is washed with clear water, and then beneath the other of the brushes 98 where the washing operation is repeated. Two washes are employed to remove all traces of the unset mix, leaving the block so surfaced as closely to resemble natural stone.

Assuming that it is desired to make half blocks or quarter blocks or three-quarter blocks, the form may be sub-divided by partitions (not shown) for which grooves or channels are provided at H8, H9 and I20 above the center lines of the respective core forms, and at i2l, I22 and I23 below the center lines of the respective core forms. It will readily be apparent to those skilled in the art how suitable partition strips may be introduced by the operator into the grooves in the opposite sides of the mold both above and below the core form at which it is desired to divide the block.

The apparatus and method here disclosed are adapted for relatively high speed production of building blocks. In actual practice each workman can produce a complete block every two minutes. The number of form units required is only one set per workman and yet the blocks have just as high a quality as if they were allowed to become completely cured before removing their forms. This is entirely attributable to the fact that the vibration permits the use of a concrete mix which would otherwise be much too wet to permit of form removal.

The very desirable finish of the faces of the blocks, however, is further attributable to the procedure just described whereby there is no adhesion f the mix to-the pallet and the intimate contact of the aggregate with the pallet which is the result of the vibration remains at the surface of the completed block'to provide a very smooth and highly regular surface even after the thin film of unset cement, lime, and glue, is washed away.

The particular nature and construction of the mold further contributes to the high quality of the block and the Speed with which it may be produced. The fact that the mold is made up of two identical units each comprising one side and one end of the mold, each unit being provided with clamping means readily engageable with the other, and the units being supported from the pallet in the manner indicated, all these are very desirable features contributing to the successful operation of molds of this character.

We claim:

1. In a machine for making concrete blocks, the combination of vibratory and non-vibratory mold supports, respectively, provided with mounting means upon which said supports are relatively movable, the non-vibratory support having a head adapted to carry a concrete form, and the other of said supports being provided with means for receiving said form in the course of relative movement between said supports, means for continuously vibrating said form-receiving support, and means for actuating one of said supports bodily with respect to the other in a direction to transfer the weight of a concrete form the like, the combination with a form supporting table and means for continuously vibrating the table, of an adjacent support, a concrete form provided with portions adapted to rest upon the support and having other portions free of said support in positions for engagement with said table, and means for producing bodily relative movement between said support and table in a direction to deposit said form upon said table, and means for producing relative movement between said support and table in a converse direction to lift said form from said table.

3. In a machine for making concrete blocks, the combination with a form supporting table, and cushion means thereon. a table supported on said cushion means for vibration respecting said frame, means for continuously vibrating the table. an adjacent support having a portion overlapping a part of the table, a, vertically. reciprocable post upon which said support is mounted, means providing a guideway in which said post is vertically reciprocable, means biasing said post and support in an upward direction, and means for depressing said post against its bias to a position for depositing on said table subject to the vibration thereof a concrete form carried by said support.

4. In a machine for making concrete blocks and the like, the combination with a form supporting table having a resilient mounting and means for continuously vibrating the table, of an adjacent support, means guiding said support for vertical movement, said support having a portion overlapping the table, and a concrete form mounted on the support in a position overlying the table and having portions free of said support for table engagement upon the downward movement of said support.

5. The combination with a concrete mold comprising a pallet, form means upon the pallet, and supporting bars below the pallet, of a head including a set of arms in supporting relation to the pallet between said supporting means, bars mounting and guiding said head for up and down motion, a spring biasing said head for upward motion, said head being depressible against the bias by an operator, a vibrating table having a portion positioned beneath said pallet supporting bars for engagement thereby. a frame provided with a resilient mounting for said table, and means for continuously vibrating said table whereby said mold may be subjected to vibration when deposited on said table by the lowering of said head.

6. The combination with a table and means for continuously vibrating the table, of an adjacent support, means for producing relative movement of said table and support respecting each other in a direction to transfer a. load from one to the other, said table and support being adapted to receive a mold normally resting on one thereof and adapted to be transferred to the other upon the occurrence of such relative movement.

7. The combination ,with relatively vibratory and non-vibratory supporting means adjacent each other and mechanism carrying one of said means for relative movement in an upright direction with respect to the other, of motion transmitting connections including continuously operable mechanism for vibrating the vibratory means, and motion transmitting connections for actuating the carrier to move the support carried thereby bodily between two positions respecting the 11 other support, both 01 said supports being adapted to sustain a given mold which in one of said positions of said carrier will rest upon one of said supports and in the other position or said carrier will be lifted therefrom to rest upon the other of said supports.

8. The combination with a vibratory table and an adjacent table, said tables being alternatively available for carrying a form in which concrete or the like is to be molded. each of said tables being disposed beneath said form in operative supporting relation thereto, means ior continuously vibrating the vibratory table, and means for moving one of said tables bodily in a generally vertical direction with respect to the other for a distance suflicient to efl'ect a. transfer of the weight of the form from one of the tables to the other, the form being sustained by the table moved vertically when such vertically movable table is in an elevated position and being deposited upon the 20 12 other table when the vertically movable table is in a depressed position.

9. The device of claim 8 in which the table second mentioned is the table movable in a vertical direction, said second mentioned table having means for eii'ecting its vertical movement respecting the vibratory table.

10. The device oi! claim 8 in which the table second mentioned is the vertically movable table, said vertically movable table being nonvibratory and provided with manually controlled means for its generally vertical movement, said nonvibratory vertically movable table having means biasing it in an upward direction and of sufllcient strength to be adapted to lift the mold from the vibratory table, the mold being deposited on the vibratory table only when the nonvibratory table is depressed against such bias.

EUGENE LEIPOLD. BRUNO GARNI.

Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,413 109.

December 24, 1946.

EUGENE LEIPOLD ET AL.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Column 10, line 45, claim 5, for means, bars read bars, means and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 25th day of March, A. D. 1947.

LESLIE FRAZER,

First Assistant Oommissioner of Patents.

11 other support, both 01 said supports being adapted to sustain a given mold which in one of said positions of said carrier will rest upon one of said supports and in the other position or said carrier will be lifted therefrom to rest upon the other of said supports.

8. The combination with a vibratory table and an adjacent table, said tables being alternatively available for carrying a form in which concrete or the like is to be molded. each of said tables being disposed beneath said form in operative supporting relation thereto, means ior continuously vibrating the vibratory table, and means for moving one of said tables bodily in a generally vertical direction with respect to the other for a distance suflicient to efl'ect a. transfer of the weight of the form from one of the tables to the other, the form being sustained by the table moved vertically when such vertically movable table is in an elevated position and being deposited upon the 20 12 other table when the vertically movable table is in a depressed position.

9. The device of claim 8 in which the table second mentioned is the table movable in a vertical direction, said second mentioned table having means for eii'ecting its vertical movement respecting the vibratory table.

10. The device oi! claim 8 in which the table second mentioned is the vertically movable table, said vertically movable table being nonvibratory and provided with manually controlled means for its generally vertical movement, said nonvibratory vertically movable table having means biasing it in an upward direction and of sufllcient strength to be adapted to lift the mold from the vibratory table, the mold being deposited on the vibratory table only when the nonvibratory table is depressed against such bias.

EUGENE LEIPOLD. BRUNO GARNI.

Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,413 109.

December 24, 1946.

EUGENE LEIPOLD ET AL.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows: Column 10, line 45, claim 5, for means, bars read bars, means and that the said Letters Patent should be read with this correction therein that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Office.

Signed and sealed this 25th day of March, A. D. 1947.

LESLIE FRAZER,

First Assistant Oommissioner of Patents.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2522906 *Apr 3, 1947Sep 19, 1950Smith Leo RChristmas tree vibrator
US2562541 *May 18, 1946Jul 31, 1951August FlamConcrete block molding machine
US2594760 *Apr 14, 1947Apr 29, 1952August FlamMolding apparatus
US2620540 *Jan 3, 1948Dec 9, 1952Weir Richard LBlock making machine
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Classifications
U.S. Classification425/432, 249/114.1, 366/111, 249/151, 425/453, 249/140, 425/404
International ClassificationB28B1/08, B28B11/00, B28B1/087, B28B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB28B7/0073, B28B11/002, B28B1/0873
European ClassificationB28B11/00D, B28B1/087B, B28B7/00F3