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Publication numberUS2413782 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1947
Filing dateJan 26, 1945
Priority dateJan 26, 1945
Publication numberUS 2413782 A, US 2413782A, US-A-2413782, US2413782 A, US2413782A
InventorsPumphrey James O
Original AssigneePumphrey James O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Doorstop
US 2413782 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 7, 1947. J. o. PUMPHREY DOOR STOP Filed Jan. 26, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. James 0. Pump/may BY Jan; 7, 1947. J. o. PUMII=HREY DOOR STOP 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 26, 1945 I N V EN TOR.

James 0. Pum /are ia/ y Patented Jan. 7, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 17 Claims.

The invention relates to a stop device for holding doors, gates and the like open or closed.

In the present embodiment of the invention, the stop is designed to-frictionally engage the floor at any point over which a door swings, as it is opened and closed but could be readily adapted, by slight modification, to serve positively in engaging relation with floor level sockets or recesses or to enter the ground to a sufficient depth to securely hold a spring or weight closed gate or like swinging member.

One of the main objects of the invention is to avoid the objectionable clash of metal in the operation of the device, that is found annoying and disturbing in the use of many door stops now on the market and to cause the same to operate silently.

A further object is to simplify the operation by alternately effecting engagement and disengagement of the stop by successive downward movements of a foot-operated plunger, the action of which is made semi-automatic through the use of a retractile spring.

Other objects of the invention and various structural features of improvement will becomev apparent from the detail description that follows.

A construction suitable for carrying my invention into efiect is illustrated in the accompanying drawings but I do not wish to be understood as intending to limit myself to the same as various changes may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as outlined in the appended claims.

In the drawings- Fig, 1 is a view in side elevation, partly in section, showing the door-holding stop'in normal position clearing the floor.

Fig. 2 is a central vertical sectional View, showing the same in position when moved downward under foot pressure to engage the floor.

Fig. 3 is a similar view showing the position taken by the cooperating parts, upon the removal of foot pressure, after the stop is moved into engagement with the floor.

Fig. 4 shows the position of the parts, when again put under foot pressure to release the clutch and permit return to the position shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is a front elevation with the casing removed.

Fig. 6 is a cross section on the line s -s of Fig. 5.

Fig. '7 is a like view on an enlarged scale, taken on the line s "--s of Fig. 5.

2 Fig. 8 is a detail vertical section on the line s s of Fig. 5. Fig. 9 is a front elevation of Fig. 8 and Fig. 10 is a detail view of the clutch and clutch control, showing a. slightly modified form of clutch lever.

Referring now to the drawings, a portion of a I floor is indicated at l and a portion of a door, to

which the stop is applied, is indicated at 2. c

Any suitable casing may be employed to enclose the mechanism of the stop but the preferred form consists of a back plate 3, secured tothe door by screws 3 3 and provided with bent-up end portions 4, 4, projecting outward at right angles to the plate. The projections 5, i are rounded at their forward ends, as shown in Figs.

6 and '7, and a removable cover 5 of ushaped cross section with grooved edges at opposite ends, as indicated at B, (i, is slidably fitted on th end projections and extends inward to the back plate, completely enclosing all operating parts except the upper end 1 of the plunger and the floor-engaging member 8, which latter is formed of rubber or other suitable material. v

Guide openings 9 and I!) are provided in the bent-up ends of the back plate to receive the plunger, the opposite ends of which extend through and beyond the openings, as shown.

The plunger is formed of a number of sections, operatively connected to move independ ently of each other and also as a unit. The lower section, to which the floorengaging member 8 is secured by a screw II, as shown in Fig. 2, is preferably in the form of a rod l2 of circular cross section, which is cut away along one side throughout the greater portion of its length to provide a fiat surface l3. For convenience of illustration, the fiat surface I 3 is shown in the drawings on the rear side of the rod IE but in designing the device for the market, the flat surface would be formed on one side, so as to present the full diameter of the rod for action of the clutch. The opening H3, in the lower projecting end of the back plate is made to conform to this cross sectional form of the rod and while permitting free lengthwise movement of the rod through the same, holds it against turning to the right or left.

The adjoining section is in the form of a tube l4, which is fitted in telescoping relation on the rod l2 and overlaps the upper end portion of the same, being thus held by a coil spring l5, which encircles the rod l2 and bears against a lower terminal flange N5, of the tube. The lower end of the spring bears on and is supported by a shelf-like projection I! formed by a cut-out and bent-up portion of the back plate, and is positioned far enough above the lower bent-up end of the plate to leave sufficient space between them to accommodat a clutch, to be presently described.

The tube M terminates at its upper end in an enlarged flat head 18, provided with a roughened surface, for engagement by the foot, in applying downwardpressure on the plunger, to operate the stop. The head is formed as a separate piece and is provided with a plug-like shank l9, that enters the upper end of thetube, to serve as a stop to limit relative downward movement of the telescoping sections [2 and it, and to transmit motion from the tube to the rod, when foot pressure is applied to move the stop member into engagement with the floor.

The shank I9 is grooved, as indicated at 20, and a slight indentation 2| of the tube entering the groove, serves to swivel the head in the tube, enabling it to yield readily to any twisting action of the foot in applying downward pressure on the plunger. A central aperture l8 is provided, which extends through the head and shank for the admission of oil to the operating parts.

The clutch is in the form of a plate 22, of substantial thickness, provided with an opening 23 through which the lower or rod section of the plunger passes. The form and diameter of the opening is such that when the plate is positioned at right angles to the rod, as in Figs. 1 and l, the rod has free movement through the opening but when the plate is tilted upward at a slight angle, as in Figs. 2 and 3, opposite edges of the opening, in line with. the direction of the tilt, bite into the rod and hold it securely against upward movement. A lug 24, at the rear of the plate, enters and has free movement in an opening 25, in the back plate 3, forming, in efiect, a pivotal or hinged mounting for the clutch, the free end of which is pressed upward by a spring 26, encircling the plunger rod, which acts continuously to apply the clutch. At the forward end of the clutch plate, opposite its pivotal mounting, a lever, in the form of a strip-like extension 21, is provided, which extends upward, substantially parallel with the plunger, into cooperative relation with the clutch control, presently to be described.

As will be apparent from the foregoing, slight in and out movement of the upper end of the lever 21, operates to shift the clutch in and out of engagement with the plunger. Such movement is imparted to the lever by a clutch control device consisting of a toothed wheel 28, loosely mounted on a short cross shaft 29, in a through slot 38 of the plunger rod as shown in Fig. 2, and moves down and up with the rod in the operation of the plunger. The wheel is provided with long and short teeth alternately arranged and is designed to be rotated clockwise, as indicated by the arrow in Fig. 1. The teeth are of such length as to project through slots 3i, 3| registering with the rod slot 3!] and are formed in opposite sides of the tubular section of the plunger that overlaps the rod section thereof, into cooperative relation with the upper end of the clutch lever, as shown. To hold the teeth of the wheel centered on the lever, the latter may be given an approximately V-shaped cross section, as shown in Fig. 10. As the long and short teeth alternately engage the lever, it is given the required movement to operate the clutch, the long teeth serving directly by positive action to disengage the clutch, as shown in Figs. 1 and 4 and the short teeth serving indi rectly by permitting the clutch spring to act and er, as shown in Figs. 2 and3. The toothed wheel is given step by step rotation by causing the upper end 32 of the tube slot 3|, to engage successive teeth of the wheel, on successive downward movements of the tube, in the operation of the plunger, and move the wheel forward the distance of nearly one tooth or from the position shown in Fig. 1, to the position shownin Fig. 2. To complete a full tooth movement of the wheel, the lower end 33 of the opposite tube slot 3!, is caused on each up stroke of the tube to similarly engage successive teeth to advance them slightly from the position shown in Fig. 2 to the position shown in Fig. 3, which brings a new tooth into position for engagement by the end 32 of the slot 3|, as shown in Fig. 3. A friction washer 34 (see Fig. 7) serves to hold the toothed wheel against undue or free movement. The shaft of the toothed wheel projects from opposite sides of the. rod into slots 31 of the tube, to hold the latter from turning to the right or left. The number of teeth on the wheel may be increased or decreased, if desiredwithout change in the operation as above described.

The operation is as follows: With the stop in normal position or clear of the floor, as shown in Fig. 1, pressure of the foot on the plunger head moves the tube section I4 thereof downward, in opposition to the spring l5, until the shank IQ of the enlarged head of the tube, engages the upper end of the rod I2, to which movement is imparted and the two sections move downward together until the stop 8 engages the floor, as shown in Fig. 2. Upon removing the foot, the spring reacts and moves the tube section upward or from the position shown in Fig. 2 to the position show-n in Fig. 3, the rod section being held by the clutch with the stop engaging the floor.

In the downward movement of the plunger just described, the toothed wheel is rotated a distance of nearly one toothor from the position shown in Fig. l to that shown in Fig. 2, which brings a short tooth forward to replace the long tooth shown in Fig. 1, thereby permitting the lever to move inward towards the plunger, und..r the action of the, clutch spring, or in the direction required to cause the clutch to engage the plunger rod and hold it against upward movement. As the tube section is moved upward by the spring, from the Fig. 2 position to that shown in Fig. 3, the. toothed wheel is given slight rotation, as previously described, to complete a one-tooth movement, which brings the end of a long tooth through the slot far enough, as shown in Fig. 3, to be engaged by the end of the slot, on the next downward movement of the plunger, and moved forward to the position shown in Fig. 4, to engage the clutch lever and release the clutch, permitting the plunger, under the action of its spring, to return to normal position shown in Fig. 1.

It will be noted that the door stop, constructed as above described, is practically silent in operation, unlike door stops now on the market, for the following reasons:

(1) There is no sudden uncontrolled action of a spring operating to bring two metallic parts into noisy contact with each other; (2) no pawls with their objectionable and characteristic clicking noises are employed; (3) the tube, being telescopically mounted on the rod and normally held in an upward position by the retractile spring, provides noiseless means of rotating the toothed wheel and of controlling the ascent of the plunger upon its release; and (4) when the tube is depressed either to set or release the plunger, all pressure of the retractile spring, normally exerted in an upward direction against the rod,

through the tube, viseliminated, thuslmaking noiseless the engagement and disengagement of the clutch.

Iclaim: a I

1. Adoor-holding stop comprising a floor-engaging member, a. spring-retracted plunger operatively connected therewith and adapted. by successive movements in one direction to alternately move said member in and out of engagement with the floor, a clutch relatively positioned to engage the plunger and thereby hold the floorengaging member when in contact relation with the fioor against retractile movement, and automatic clutch control means responsive to movement of the plunger and adapted in operation to efiect adjustment of the clutch for alternate movement in and out of engagement with the plunger.

2. A door-holding stop comprising a floor-engaging member, a spring-retracted plunger operatively connected therewith and adapted by successive movements in one direction to alternately move said member in and out of engagement with the floor, an automatic clutch spring-actuated to engage the plunger and thereby hold the floor-engaging member when in contact relation with the fioor against retractile movement, and automatic clutch control means operated by movement of the plunger to effect adjustment of the clutch for alternate movement in and out of engagement with the plunger.

3. A door-holding stop comprising a floor-engaging member, a spring-retracted plunger operatively connected therewith and movable downward by foot pressure, said plunger being adapted by successive downward movements to cause said member to alternately move in and out of engagement with the floor, a clutch relatively positioned to engage the plunger and thereby hold the floor-engaging member when in contact relation with the floor against upward movement and automatic clutch control means actuated by movement of the plunger to alternately effect engagement and disengagement of the clutch with the plunger.

4. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the movement imparted to the springretracted plunger is by foot pressure in a downward direction and is transmitted to the clutch control to adjust the same for the succeeding action by the clutch on the next downward movement of the plunger.

5. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the plunger is moved downward by foot pressure and upward by spring action and both movements of the plunger are transmitted to adjust the clutch control for the succeeding action by the clutch.

6. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation and movable independently of each other.

7. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation and movable independently of each other, one of the sections being a rod and the adjoining section a tube slidably fitted on the rod and both limited to movement in the direction of their length.

8. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation and movable independently of each other, one of the sections being a rod and the adjoining section a tube slidably fitted to the rod, the tube having a clo- .su're adjacent its upper end normally separated from the rod and adapted to be moved into engagement therewith to impart downward movement to the rod under foot pressure applied to the plunger to engage and disengage the stop.

9. A door-holding stop, as defined inclaim l, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation and movable independently of each other, one of the sections being a rod and the adjoining section a tube slightly fitted to the rod, the tube having a closure adjacent its upper end normally separated from the rod by the action of the retractile spring of the plunger and adapted to be moved into engagement therewith, in opposition to the aforesaid spring, to impart downward movement to the rod under foot pressure applied to the plunger to engage and disengage the stop.

10. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation and movable independently of each other, the lower section being a rod having the floor-engaging member secured at its lower end and the adjoining section being a tube slidably fitted to the rod and overlapping a portion thereof.

11. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation and movable independently of each other, the lower section being a rod having the floor-engaging member secured at its lower end and the adjoining section being a tube slidably fitted to the rod and overlapping a portion thereof, relative movement of the aforesaid lower and adjoining sections being opposed by the retractile spring of the plunger in one direction and imparted to them by the spring in the opposite direction.

12. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation, one of the sections being a rod and the adjoining section a tube slidably fitted to and overlapping the rod and provided in the overlapping portions with a pin and slot stop to limit relative rotary movement of the sections.

13. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation, one of the sections being a rod and the adjoining section a tube slidably fitted to and overlapping the rod and provided in the overlapping portions with registering through slots in which the automatic clutch control is mounted.

14. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation, one of the sections being a rod and the adjoining section a tube slidably fitted to and overlapping the rod and provided in the overlapping portions with registering through slots in which the automatic clutch control in the form of a toothed wheel is rotatably mounted with the teeth thereof projecting from the slots into cooperating relation with the clutch.

15. A door-holding stop, as defined in claim 1, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation, one of the sections being a rod and the adjoining section a tube slidably fitted to and overlapping the rod and provided in the overlapping portions with registering through slots in which the automatic clutch control in the form of a toothed wheel is rotatably mounted, the Wheel having long and short teeth alternately arranged and projecting beyond trol in the form of a toothed wheel is rotatably a.

mounted, the Wheel having long and, short teeth alternately arranged and projecting beyond the slots into engaging relation with an extension, of they clutch, the slots in the tube being given. such length, that, in repeatedoperations of the plunger,

the end of one slot successively engages the. teet and gives the wheel intermittent rotary motion to bring the long and short teeth. thereof alter- '8 na'tely intov engagementwith an extensiorrot the clutch.

17. A door-holding stop, as defined'i'nl claim 1, in which the plunger is formed in sections arranged in telescoping relation, one of the sections being a. rodv and the adjoining section a tube slidably fitted to and overlapping the rod and provided in the. overlapping portions. with registering through slots in which the. automatic clutch control is mounted, the oppositely disposed slots in the. tube being given. such length that, in the repeated operation of the plunger, the. upper end ofv one. slot and the lower end of the other slot successively engage the. teeth of the Wheel and give. itv intermittent rotary motion to bring. the long and short, teeth thereof alternatelyinto engagementwith an extension of the clutch.

JAMES O. PUMPHREY.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5092250 *Nov 1, 1990Mar 3, 1992Ttx CompanyAnti-pilferage device for container-carrying railroad flatcars
US20100101156 *May 8, 2009Apr 29, 2010Oldbury Uk LimitedBarrier system
WO1995029316A1 *Apr 26, 1995Nov 2, 1995Ian FraserSecuring apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification292/178, 292/181
International ClassificationE05C17/00, E05C17/44
Cooperative ClassificationE05C17/446
European ClassificationE05C17/44C