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Publication numberUS2413925 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1947
Filing dateOct 10, 1944
Priority dateOct 10, 1944
Publication numberUS 2413925 A, US 2413925A, US-A-2413925, US2413925 A, US2413925A
InventorsMassion Jack
Original AssigneeMassion Jack
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lather maker
US 2413925 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 7, 1947. J. MASSION LATHER MAKER Filed Oct. 10, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jhcz ZYAS m/ns-xvrae w p, .a

mi/ 1 l ATZUAP/VE'V Jan. 7, 1947. 1 J. MASSION 2,413,925

' LATHER MAKER 'Filed Oct. 10, 1944 2 Sheets-$heet 2 Patented Jan. 7, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE LATHER MAKER Jack Massion, .Los Angeles, Calif.

Application October 10, 1944, Serial No. 557,991

This invention has to do with a lather maker, it being a general object of the invention to provide a device or mechanism operable to produce suds or lather from liquid soap. It is a general object of the present invention to provide a simple, effective and practical mechanism of the general character referred to.

Lather makers or lather making machines operable to make lather from liquid soap have been employed in barber shops and, as heretofore made, such devices have been rather complicated and cumbersome. The devices heretofore provided have been of such character and construction as to be wholly impractical for home use.

It is a general object of this invention to provide a simplified compact lather producing mechanism that can be used to advantage in the home. The structure of the present invention is such as to advantageously produce a portable machine practical for individual use in the home. The mechanism of the present invention is compact and extremely simple to operate and is such that it can be readily stored away when not in use.

It is another object of this invention to provide a mechanism of the character referred to involving a control for the liquidsoap which operates so that soap will not escape from the device when it is not in use. The device of the present invention involves a container or reservoir carrying liquid soap and it includes an automatic control valve which seals or closes the reservoir except when the device is in operation.

Another object of this invention is to provide various features of arrangement and construction of parts all of which combine to form a lather maker which is extremely simple and inexpensive of manufacture and also compact and practical for general use.

The various objects and features of my invention will be fully understood from the following,

detailed description of a typical preferred form and application of the invention, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanyingidrawings, in which:

Fig. l is a side view of the lather maker provided by my invention with the principal parts shown in section. Fig. 2 is anend view taken as indicated by line 2-:2 on Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is an end 5 Claims. (Cl. 2599) volved in the present invention, and Fig. '7 is a sectional view taken as indicated by line 1---! on Fig. 5.

The machine or mechanism provided by my invention is useful, generally, where it is desired to form a lather from liquid soap, or the like. The invention can be employed to advantage in a form suitable for use by an individual for the making of lather for shaving and, consequently,

I have shown the invention in such form, it being understood, however, that such detailed reference is not to be construed as limiting the scope or range of application of theinvention.

The device of the present invention involves, generally, a reservoir Ill for liquid soap, a beater H operable to receive soap and air and beat or whip such elements into a lather, a case I2 around the beater forming a chamber in which the beater operates, supply means l3 connecting the reservoir ID with the beater H for conveying soap between these parts, a control M for the q supply means l'3, a motor l5 for driving the beater, means IQ for admitting air to the beater or "to the beater carrying chamber of case l2, a control I! for the dischar e of lather from the case l2, a heater 18, a housing [9 for the general assembly of parts, and various other parts and features of construction all of which will be more fully described.

The reservoir Ill includes a suitably shaped body which forms a container for a body of liquid soap S. The body of the reservoir may, in practice, vary widely in size and shape. However, it is preferred to make it substantially rectangular in cross section and to make it elongate in general form and of a length corresponding generally, to that of the assembled working parts, as appears in Fig. 1 of the drawings. 2B of the reservoir can be formed of any suitable material. For example, it can be advantageously formed of a transparent, or possibly trans- H lucent, material, so that the user can readily view taken as indifiated by. line. 33 on Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken as indicated by line 4-4 on Fig.1. Fig. 5 is an enlarged detailed sec which the liquid soap and air are handled and controlled. Fig.5 is an end view of the beater indetermine the quantity of soap therein. The body 20 is provided at any suitable point, for instance ''at its top, with a filling opening 2| normally closed by a cap 22. v

The assembly formed by the beater II and its case 12 is preferably located at one end 'of the reservoir I0, which end I will term the forward end of the machine. In the particular arrangement illustrated the assembly of beater and case is arranged in and projects somewhat forward from the forward end of the housing 19. The'ca'se I2 is providedprimarily'to form-a mlxingchamberC-in which the beater ll oper- In practice the body ates. The case in the form illustrated involves an annular side wall 23, a fiat inner end wall 2 and a flat outer end wall 25. In the construction illustrated the outer end wall is detachable from the side wall 23, and the inner end wall 24 is supported by a part of the housing that may be termed a base 26 and which is rigid with the forward end portion of the reservoir II). In practice the inner end wall 24 and base 26 may be formed integrally if so desired.

A boss 28' projects from the inner side of the base 26 and forms a bearing to support a drive shaft 2'! which extends from the motor I5 through the boss 2'! and the inner wall 24 of the case into the chamber C.

The beater II is carried or fixed'on the shaft 21 in the chamber C of the case I2 and, in practice, it may include a hub 30 fixed on the shaft, paddles 3I projecting from the hub and soap and air distributing pipes 32 also projecting from the hub. In the form illustrated the beater involves two paddles 3| which are fiat, suitably pitched members projecting from diametrically opposite sides of the hub 30, and these parts have openings 33 through them.

The distributing pipes 32 project radially from the hub 30 at points between the paddles 3!. The pipes have openings longitudinally through them and communicating with annular channels 46 provided in the bore of the hub 30 which receives the shaft 21.

The supply means I3 connects the reservoir ID with the beater so that soap from the reservoir is supplied to the beater to be formed into a lather within the chamber C. The supply means involves, generally, a duct extending between the body 20 of the reservoir and the boss 26' on the base 26. The boss 26' has an annular channel 4| surrounding the shaft and the duct 4!] is in open communication with the channel 4|. One or more lateral ports 42 is provided in the shaft communicating With the channel M and extending inward to communi cate with a central chamber 43 in the shaft. The chamber 43 communicates with a longitudinal passage 44 in the shaft which extends through the portion of the shaft-which carries the beater. A lateral port 45 joins the passage 44 with one of the channels having communication with one of the distributing pipes of the beater.

The control I4 for the means I3 includes a valve member arranged in the chamber 43 to cooperate with the end of the passage 44 which opens into the chamber 43 to close the passage 44 when the valve member is in a forward position. A stem 5| projects rearwardly from the valve part 50 .in chamber 43 to extend through a central opening 52 provided through the shaft continuing from the chamber 43 beyond a packing 53 which serves to separate the chamber 43 and the opening 52. A spring54 is provided in connection with the valve stem 5| to normally yieldingly urge the valve forward so that it is normally held in the closed position. A pivot pin 55 is carried by the valve stem so that its ends project from the side of the shaft through longitudinal slots 55 in the shaft. A centrifugal ring 51 surrounds the shaft and is pivotally supported on the pin 55 and reacts against a stop 58 which projects from the shaft.

; when the parts are atrest, as shownin the drawings, the centrifugal ring- 5? is .in an in-" clined position, allowing the' 'spring to hold' the valve closed. When the shaft is put in motion or is rotated by the motor I 5, centrifugal force acting on the ring causes the ring to react against the stop 58 and set up a force on the valve stem which causes it to move in the direction indicated by the arrow X in Fig. 5 and thus open the valve 50. When the valve 50 is opened the liquid soap is free to flow from the reservoir to the beater.

The motor I5 is preferably a small electric motor of suitable capacity and speed connected with the shaft 21 to drive it. In the particular case illustrated the motor is shown under the rear end portion of the reservoir I 0 and it is shown directly connected with the shaft 21.

The means I6 for admitting air to the beater includes the passage 44 in the outer end of the shaft communicating with the other channel 46 which communicates with a lateral port 10 that connects to the other of the pipes 32. In the preferred arrangement a plug or barrier 1| is provided in the passage 44 between the ports 45 and m so that liquid soap is discharged through one pipe 32 while air is discharged through the other pipe 32.

The means I6 includes a counterbore 12 in the outer end of the shaft communicating with the passage 44 and a plug 73 is threaded into the counterbore and carries a valve head I4 which cooperates with the end of the passage 44 where it joins the counterbore. A longitudinal opening 15 is provided through the plug and a lateral port or outlet near the valve 14. The arrangement is such that air is free to flow through the passage or opening 15 and then past the valve 74 to enter the outer end of passage 44 in the shaft. By varying the position of the plug the flow of air can be regulated as desired.

The-control I l for the lather includes an outlet duct communicating with the case, preferably with the peripheral portion of the case, and a pivoted shutter 8| controlling the discharge end of the duct. The shutter 8I may be carried on a pivot pin 82 and may be provided with an operating handle 83. In operation the case C fills with lather and the lather flows out of the case through the duct 80 when the shutter 8| is operated to uncover the outlet end of the duct.

In the preferred form of the invention I provide a heater operable to heat the lather delivered by the device. In the arrangement illustrated a heater winding or coil 88 is provided around the annular wall 23 of the case I2. It will be understood that the winding 88 may be connected in the circuit with the motor I5 so that when the device is in operation the heater operates to heat the case so that the lather delivered therefrom is heated.

The housing I 9 is provided to encase the working parts that would otherwise be exposed and to give the device a pleasing external appearance. In the case illustrated the housing I9 involves a shell-like body 90 which surrounds the case I2 and heater I8, the means I3, the means I4 and the motor I5. In the drawings I have shown the body 90 of the housing substantially square in cross section and equal in-width to the reservoir-I0. It isyto be understoodthat in practice the housing can beformedof any suitable material and can be made in any suitable form to give the desired appearance to the device. It is desirable in practice to'rnake the housing simple inform and to fit it as close as possible to the parts that it; houses so; that the device is as compact and- .;s i mpleas;,possible. ji

fTheg-motorI5;is- 1preferably of the type com monly; employed in devices of the character described and may be under control of a switch 99 at the rear end portion of the device, which switch is connected between a suitable electrical conduit I05] and the rear end of the housing It.

In use a suitable supply of soap S is provided in the reservoir l and under normal conditions or, that is, when the device is not in use, the valve 50 is closed or is in position to close the passage 44 so that no soap will drain from the reservoir to escape from the device. As soon as the motor I is put in operation the shaft 21 revolves and the centrifugal ring 51 acts to move the stem 5| of the valve opening the valve 56 and allowing feed of soap from the reservoir to the beater. As the beater revolves at high speed under the action of the motor l5 the pipes 32 of the beater through centrifugal action cause soap and air to be drawn into the chamber C. One pipe which is in communication with the reservoir I0 through the means l3, above described, delivers soap into the chamber C, while the other pipe 32 delivers air into the chamber C under control of the means l6. By adjusting the plug 73 of the means It the amount of air can be adjusted. As the device operates and the lather is formed the lather is heated by the means [8 and when the user opens the shutter SI of the means I! the heated lather is allowed to escape from the chamber.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that I have provided a mechanism that is extremely simple and inexpensive of manufacture and which is highly desirable for individual use. All a user has to do is keep a supply of soap in the reservoir I0 and to use the device it is merely necessary to actuate the switch 99 and then open the shutter of the means l'l whenever lather is desired. The mechanism is such that the rotation of the beater through centrifugal action effectively feeds the soap andair so that lather is quickly formed in the case C and, in a very brief space of time, there is a supply of lather in the case ready for discharge through the means IT. 1

Having described only a typical preferred form and application of my invention, I do not-wish to be limited or restricted to the specific details herein set forth, but wish to reserve to myself any variations or modifications that may appear to those skilled in the art and fall within the scope of the following claims:

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A lather maker including, a reservoir for liquid soap, an electric motor, a beater driven by the motor, means connecting the reservoir and beater for passage of soap from the reservoir to the beater, a manually operable switch controlling the motor and a, control for the said means including a valve normally closing said means again-st the passage of soap and a speed responsive member driven by the motor and acting when the beater is operating only above a predetermined speed to open the valve.

2. A lather maker including, a reservoir for liquid soap, an electric motor, a beater driven by the motor, means connecting the reservoir and beater for passage of soap from the reservoir to the beater, a manually operable switch controlling the motor and a control for the said means including a, valve normally closing said means against the passage of soap and a centrifugal member driven by the motor and connected to the valve to open the valve only when the beater i operating.

3. A lather maker including, a reservoir for liquid soap, a case, a motor, a shaft driven by the motor and extending into the case, a beater on the shaft in the case, an air inlet delivering air to the beater, soap supply means connecting the reservoir and beater, and a control for the a supply means, the beater including a distributing duct for air and a distributing duct for soap.

4. A lather maker including, a reservoir for liquid soap, a case, a motor, a shaft driven by the motor and extending into the case, a beater on the shaft in the case, an air inlet delivering air to the beater, soap supply means connecting the reservoir and beater, and a control for the supply means, the beater including a hub on the shaft, an air distributing duct projecting from the hub and a soap distributing duct projecting from the hub.

5. A lather maker including, a reservoir for liquid soap, a case, a motor, a shaft driven by the motor and extending into the case and having a longitudinal passage in it, a beater on the shaft in the case in communciation with the passage, supply means connecting the reservoir and the passage, and a control for the supply means operated by the shaft and normally closing the supply means against passage of soap, the beater including a hub on the shaft, paddles projecting from the hub, and separate curved distributing pipes for air and soap projecting from the hub.

JACK MASSION.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2517539 *Sep 16, 1949Aug 8, 1950Oster John Mfg CoLather making machine and method of making lather
US2716544 *May 12, 1954Aug 30, 1955Jr William M ExleyMixing valve
US2819927 *Jul 28, 1954Jan 14, 1958Morris B HolmbergLather making machine
US6439756 *May 1, 2000Aug 27, 2002EKATO Rühr- und Mischtechnik GmbHAgitator
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/142, 222/52, 366/104, 366/169.2, 261/85, 366/160.1, 261/DIG.260, 366/604, 366/170.3
International ClassificationA45D27/12
Cooperative ClassificationY10S366/604, Y10S261/26, A45D27/12
European ClassificationA45D27/12