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Publication numberUS2414391 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1947
Filing dateMar 4, 1943
Priority dateMar 4, 1943
Publication numberUS 2414391 A, US 2414391A, US-A-2414391, US2414391 A, US2414391A
InventorsCharles R Peaker
Original AssigneeUs Rubber Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manufacture of articles of rubberlike material
US 2414391 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Jan. 14, 1941 MANUFACTURE OF ARTICLES F RUBBERLIKE MATERIAL Charles R. Peaker, Union City, Conn., asslgnor to United States Rubber Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey No Drawing. Application March 4, 1943, Serial No. 478,031

12 Claims.

This invention relates to the manufacture of articles of rubber-like material, and more particularly to improving the tensile strensth of articles directly deposited from aqueous dispersions of rubber-like copolymers of butadiene and a monovinyl compound which is copolymerizable" such synthetic rubber-like materials are formed in a known manner by the emulsion-copolymerization in an aqueous medium of the butadiene and monpvinyl compound. Such aqueous dispersions of these synthetic rubber-like materials when compounded with the usual vulcanizing agents and accelerators, and dried to form a film and vulcanized, give stocks which have very low tensile strengths. It is necessary to materially improve the tensile strength of articles that are deposited directly from aqueous dispersions oi copolymers of butadiene and monovinyl compounds.

I have discovered that the addition or waterinsoluble clay to such an aqueous dispersion of a copolymer of butadiene and a monovinyl compound increases the tensile strength of articles deposited directly from the artificial rubber dispersion. Improvements in tensile strength up to 100% to 200% are possible with loadings of up to 50 parts of clay per 100 parts of copolymer solids of dispersions of copolymers of butadiene and styrene and improvements in tensile strength up to 300% with similar loadings of aqueous dispersions of copolymers of butadiene and. acrylic nitrile. The term water-insoluble clay refers to those clays that are essentially insoluble or nonswellable in water, such as kaolin and the non-colloidal or so-called hard clays, for example, those known as Dixie Par, Suprex, Crown, Catalpo and Anchor clays, andexclude the hydrophilic colloidal clays, such as bentonite and wilkinite, which have the property of being readily swelled in 'water.

The article may be directly deposited from an aqueous dispersion of such synthetic rubber-like material containing the clay and vulcanizing ingredients, in any of the conventional ways of manufacturing articles directly from rubber latex, as for example, by dipping a form into the dispersion, or spraying the dispersion onto a like materials.

. 2 form, or by spreading the dispersion on a belt or so-called blanket, ii the article is to be a sheet, and drying, and vulcanizing. The deposition on a form may be speeded up, as in conventional rubber latex practices, by treating the term first with a coagulant for the dispersion, and then dipping into the dispersion of rubber-like material, or by dipping first in the dispersion. then coagulating the film by dipping the form into the coagulant, and again dipping in the dispersion and allowing the form to remain in the dispersion until the desired thickness of rubber-like material has been built up. These manipulative procedures for directly depositing rubber articles directly from latex are well known, and similar.

methods may be utilized in depositing articles directly from dispersions of these synthetic rubber- If desired, the article may be composed wholly of the synthetic rubber-like material directly deposited from the dispersion or it may be in the form of a base material coated with, or otherwise having attached thereto, such direct deposit oi an aqueous dispersion of the synthetic rubber-like material.

The improvement in tensile strength or films deposited from aqueous dispersions of copolymers of butadiene and a monovinyl compound by the addition of water-insoluble clay to the dispersion, is illustrated in the following examples:

Example I A dispersion was prepared by the conjoint emulsion-polymerization in an aqueous medium of parts of butadiene-1,3 and 25 parts of styrene in the presence of 5 parts of soap (commercial "Ivory Soap Flakes). The dispersion had a solids content of 16.4%. This dispersion was concentrated by adding 2.1 parts or a 2% aqueous solution of ammonium alginate. and 4.9 parts of a 10% aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide per parts of dispersion, and allowing to stand 8 days, whereupon the dispersion creamed and a supernatant layer of 41.5% solids content cream was removed from the serum portion. To 240 parts by weight of the 41.5% solids content cream, as prepared above, was added a 24 hour ball-milled paste of vulcanizing ingredients comprising:

' no sacrifice in breaking elongation.

ural rubber latex, on the other hand, the addi- A 40% water-insoluble clay dispersion was prepared by ball-milling 100 parts by weight of Suprex clay together with 144 parts of water and 6 parts of commercial dispersing agent for 24 hours. To portions of the above compounded dispersionof the copolymer were added various amounts of this clay dispersion to give difierent proportions of clay to dispersion solids, as shown in the table below. Test films were prepared in this and the following examples by spreading the dispersion compounds on level glass plates and vulcanized in an air oven at 100 C. Results (averages of a range of cure) of measurements of vmodulus at 200% elongation, tensile strength,

and.elongation at break of test pieces cut from the vulcanized films, together with the percent of permanent set, measured immediately after breaking the test strip, are tabulated below:

Modulus Percent clay Tenslle on1 e gg gg sltlgength, 31 23;; Permaneni copo ymer s. per se percen solids P sq. in.

Example II In this case a commercial aqueous dispersion of 38.5% total solids content'resulting from the emulsion-copolymerization of butadiene-1,3 and acrylic nitrile (sold under the trade name Hycar OR Latex) was concentrated to 53.1% total solids by creaming in a manner similar to the creaming of the dispersion in Example I with .16 part of ammonium alginate and 1.2 parts potassium hydroxideper 100 parts' of the dispersion. To 190 parts by weight of the 53.1% solids content cream was added the ball-milled paste of vulcanizing ingredients of Example I, and to various portions of the thus compounded dispersion were added various amounts of the clay dispersion of Example 1. Test films were prepared as above described and tested with the following results:

Modulus Percent clay Tensile onl e 25 3522; sltgength, ggg gg Permanent copo ymer 5. per se percen sol s 5': {i sq. in. percent It may be seen from Examples I and II that very definite improvements in tensile strength and modulus are imparted to articles deposited directly from aqueous dispersions of copolymers of butadiene and other polymerizable materials, such as styrene and acrylic nitrile, by the additionof water-insoluble clay. There is little or With nattion of water-insoluble clays decreases considerably both the tensile strength and elongation at break as shown in the following table where various amounts of Suprex clay comparable to those used in Examples I and II were addedto a conventionally compounded natural rubber latex which was dried and vulcanized, and from the films of-which test pieces ,igwe' e' prepared and tested as above:

Per cent clay Tensile Ultimate on the rubber strength, lbs. elongation, solids per sq. in. per cent set but where such an increase in permanent setis not objectionable, or where the increase in the tensile strength is sufficient to overcome possible objections to increased permanent set, the present invention is of definite advantage. I

In view of the many changes and modifications that may be made without departing from the principles underlying the invention; reference should be made to the appended claims for an understanding of the scope of the protection afforded the invention. v I

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1.- Method of making articles of rubber-like materials which comprises directly depositing-in the desired shape the solids of anaqueous dispersion of a copolymer of butadieneand a monovinyl compound, said dispersion containing water -insoluble clay, drying and vulcanizing.

2. Method of making articles of rubber-like materials which comprises directly depositing in the desired shape the solids of an aqueous dispersion of a copolymer of butadiene and a monovinyl compound, said dispersion containing up to 50 parts water-insoluble clay per 100 parts of copolymer, drying and vulcanizing.

3.. Method of making articles of rubber-like materials which comprises directly depositing in the desired shape the solids of an aqueous dispersion of a copolymer of butadiene and styrene,

said dispersion containing water-insoluble clay.

drying and vulcanizing.

4. Method of making articles of rubber-like materials which comprises directly depositing in the desired shape the solids or an aqueous dispersion of a copolymer of butadiene and styrene, said dispersion containing up to 50 parts waterinsoluble clay per 100 parts of copolymer, drying.

and vulcanizing.

5. Method of making articles of rubber-like materials which comprises directly depositing in posit of solids of an aqueous dispersion of a copolymer of butadiene and a monovinyl compound, said dispersion containing water-insoluble clay.

8. A shaped article comprising the direct deposit of solids of an aqueous dispersion 01' a copolymer of butadiene and a monovinyl compound, said dispersion containing up to 50 parts of water-insoluble clay per 100 parts of copolymer.

9. A shaped article comprising the direct deposit of solids of an aqueous dispersion of a copolymer of butadiene and styrene, said dispersion containing water-insoluble clay.

10. A shaped article comprising the direct deposit of solids or an aqueous dispersion of a co- -ble clay per 100 parts of copolymer.

CHARLES R. PEAKER.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2510370 *Jul 25, 1946Jun 6, 1950Goodrich Co B FCoagulation of synthetic latex
US2531396 *Mar 29, 1947Nov 28, 1950Nat Lead CoElastomer reinforced with a modified clay
US2571075 *Aug 23, 1947Oct 9, 1951Victor Mfg & Gasket CoGasket material and method of making same
US2802811 *Nov 2, 1953Aug 13, 1957Vanderbilt Co R TChloroprene stabilized with a mixture of zinc dimethyl dithiocarbamate and the zinc salt of mercaptobenzothiazole
US3226462 *Oct 12, 1961Dec 28, 1965Dow Chemical CoProcess for producing microporous films
US3354243 *Jul 13, 1966Nov 21, 1967Nat Friction Products CorpMethod of curing rubber extrusions
US4323400 *Jul 30, 1980Apr 6, 1982Henning William JArticles having an insulative coating containing kaolin and staple fibers
US7208039Mar 23, 2005Apr 24, 2007Imerys Pigments, Inc.Hyperplaty clays and their use in paper coating and filling, methods for making same, and paper products having improved brightness
US7214264Apr 19, 2005May 8, 2007Imerys Pigments, Inc.Kaolin having a shape factor of at least 80:1; barrier coatings and fillers for paper; paint extenders; slurries may include hectorite, bentonite, smectite and/or carboxymethyl cellulose as stabilizers
US7226005Mar 23, 2005Jun 5, 2007Imerys Pigments, Inc.Hyperplaty clays and their use in paper coating and filling, methods for making same, and paper products having improved brightness
US7413601Aug 17, 2001Aug 19, 2008Imerys Pigments, Inc.Filler material in compositions for making uncoated paper; calcium carbonate
US7442281Aug 17, 2001Oct 28, 2008Imerys Minerals LimitedParticles suitable for use as filler for improved supercalendered paper by attrition grinding of an aqueous suspension, centrifuging to separate into course and fine particles, returning the coarse fraction to the grinder; <10% of a particle size >10 mu m and <10% a particle size less than 0.25 mu m.
US7875151Sep 19, 2008Jan 25, 2011Imerys Minerals Ltd.Kaolin products and their production
Classifications
U.S. Classification524/446, 260/DIG.220, 106/38.2, 264/236
International ClassificationC08J5/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S260/22, C08J2321/00, C08J5/02
European ClassificationC08J5/02