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Publication numberUS2414424 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1947
Filing dateMar 1, 1946
Priority dateMar 1, 1946
Publication numberUS 2414424 A, US 2414424A, US-A-2414424, US2414424 A, US2414424A
InventorsStevens Jr Brooks
Original AssigneeLawrence Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitted fabric with noncurling, longitudinally extending edges, and method of making same
US 2414424 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 14, 1947. STEVENS, JR 2,414,424

KNITTED FABRIC WITH NONCURLING LONGITUDINALLY ETHOD OF MAKING SAME EDGES AND M Filed March 1, 1946 PLAM/ Invezfiar: Brookg \Sifevenadi'r Patented Jan. 14, 1947 KNITTED FABRIC WITH NONCURLING, LON- GITUDINALLY EXTENDING EDGES, AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Brooks Stevens, Jr., Concord, Mass, assignor to Lawrence Manufacturing Company,

Lowell,

Mass, a corporation of Massachusetts [application March 1, 1946, Serial No. 651,170

17 Claims.

This invention relates to knitted fabrics with non-curling, longitudinally extending edges and to the method of making the same.

In order that the principle of the invention may be readily understood, I have disclosed certain embodiments thereof in the accompanying drawing, wherein- Fig. 1 is a face plan view, partly broken away lengthwise, of a piece of plain knit fabric having longitudinally extending or lateral edges of rib knitting to prevent curling, said piece of fabric being cut from a continuously knit tube, the knitted loop-structure being exactly shown upon a large scale;

Fig, 2 is a perspective view of a plain knitted tube with rib knitted, longitudinally extending areas and from which tube the fabric piece of Fig. 1 and another like piece are produced by cutting the tube along desirably median lines through said rib knit areas;

Fig. 3 is a face view of a plain, fiat knit fabric having non-curling, longitudinally extending, rib knit areas, the flat knit fabrichaving selvaged, non-cut edges, the knitted loops, however, not being shown upon such a large scale nor in such detail as in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3, but of a wider flat knit fabric having a series of intermediate, rib knitted, longitudinal areas along which the fabric is to be cut into several pieces to produce non-curling, longitudinal edges; and

Fig. 5 is a small detail showing the back of the knitted fabric of any of said structures, as having a coating applied thereto by means of calender rolls or otherwise.

My invention relates to a knitted fabric made from any suitable material whether it be a textile yarn of cotton, wool, silk, rayon or the like or a synthetic yarn, as well as to the method of making the fabric.

The fabric to which my invention is directed is plain knitted upon a single set of needles excepting for the longitudinally extending, relatively narrow, area or areas of rib knitting made upon two sets of needles, such rib knit area or areas being formed to provide the non-curling, longitudinally extending area or areas, whether the longitudinally extending, rib knit area or areas be provided with two sets of needles at said rib knit area or areas by knitting a continuous tube upon a single set of needles (the longitudinally extending, rib knit areas formed at one or more circumferentially spaced points, said rib knit area or areas being then cut through along preferably median longitudinal lines to produce one or more fabrics from such tube) or whether the fabric is knitted as a fiat fabric upon a single set of needles excepting the longitudinally extending, actual edges which are rib knitted, in which case the rib knit edges are true selvages. Such fiat knit fabric may be of such width that it is provided between the actually selvaged, rib knitted areas with one or more intermediate longitudinally extending, rib knit areas along median lines of which the fabric is to be cut into a series of pieces.

Whenever it is desirable to handle or to process in any way a fabric knitted on a single row of needles, whether it be knit as a fiat, plain fabric or as a tube to be cut up along one or more longitudinally extending lines, it is necessary to provide some means to prevent the curling of the longitudinally extending edge portions of the fabric. This curling tendency results from the clasticity of the yarn and from the fact that in a plain knit fabric all the loops are made or drawn in one direction, as will be evident from an inspection of Fig. 1, between the rib knit areas thereof and from a consideration of the structure of any plain knit fabric.

Such curling tendency causes great manufacturing difficulties especially when there is occasion to coat the knitted fabric with another substance, as by means of calender rolls. In order to secure proper adhesion of the applied substance, it is usually necessary to apply the coating, such as rubber or the like, under considerable heat and pressure. In order to obtain the required pressure the calender rolls must be accuratel set with very little clearance beyond the thickness of the knitted cloth or fabric itself. If the knitted cloth or fabric becomes curled at a longitudinally extending edge or edges thereof, the result is that two or even more thicknesses of the knitted fabric pass between the rolls and are crushed. This resulting mixture of crushed knitted fabric and rubber will then be carried back up into thetop rolls of the calender and be distributed into the compound. Such mixture will later be coated onto the fabric and will appear as small bumps, lumps and bunches, obviously resulting in imperfect merchandise.

The same difficulty occurs when, instead of using calender rolls, the operative applies the coating of rubber or other substance onto the knitted fabric by the use of a spreader or doctor blade. This manual procedure causes lengthwise tension of the fabric and this increases the curling effect in plain knit fabrics. This curling difficulty actually becomes accentuated when such manual procedure is resorted to.

I have attempted, prior to the conception of my present invention, to get rid of the highly objectionable curling of the longitudinally extending edges of a plain knitted fabric by sizing such edges with a starch, a gum, latex, and other substances so as to produce a stiffening and a setting of the knitted loops of the yarn along a relatively narrow, longitudinally extending area but without satisfactory results Such sizing, in the case of tubular knit fabrics, I have in some cases applied before the knitted tube is cut lengthwise into one or more longitudinally extending pieces, that is, before the goods is laid out flat in a single thickness. This procedure is, however, a difficult one and the expense of sizing the knitted goods as described adds to the cost of manufacturing. Moreover, the necessary later operation of drying the knitted goods is slowed down due to the excess water and the hydroscopic guality of the longitudinally extending edges. Moreover, such manner of procedure has a tendency to increase the thickness or gauge of the fabric at the longitudinally extending edges and this creates difiiculties in later operations upon the fabric.

V A fabric knitted in accordance with my invention :(that is, a plain knit fabric having noncurling, longitudinally extending edges formed by the expedient of knitting said edges as ribbed work) is very effectively adapted to the printing of such knitted fabric on machines normally employed to print woven goods.

, While the nature of a rib knit fabric is well known and the fact is evident that by knitting a fabric upon two sets of intersecting needles, the yarn is drawn in opposite directions by the needles of the two sets, yet, so far as I am aware, no one heretofore has ever provided a plain knit fabric with non-curling, longitudinally extending edges by the expedient of knitting those edges as ribbed work or structure. In producing such a non-curling, longitudinally. extending edge I have taken advantage of the nature of rib-knit loops wherein the yarn is alternately drawn to the front face and to the rear face of the fabric by the movements of the intersecting sets of needles.

, The rib knitting of the longitudinally extending edges of the fabric may be one-and-one rib, two-and-one rib, three-and-one rib, etc., and the width of such rib knitted edges may be as great as is found most desirable, as, for example, an inch more or less, but I have thus far obtained the best results by one-and-one rib knitting, and I believe that this is due to the fact that when between each two needles of one set is interposed a needle of the other set the yarn is equally drawn, throughout the lateral extent of the rib knit area, to the face and to the back of the fabric. I have, however, obtained excellent results by two-and-one rib, etc. Obviously the nature or character of the rib knitting may itself be varied in well known manner as by producing half-cardigan, tuck stitches, full cardigan and rack stitches, but to do so is not essential to the invention. Therefore, the term rib knitting is employed by me in a broad sense to include the usual or other stitch variations that may be employed in a rib knitted fabric, and the portion of the fabric between the rib knit areas, which I have described asplain knit, may itself have stitch variations therein.

. Referring more particularlyy to the drawing and first to Fig. -1,"theifabric therein shown is the face of a plain knit fabric composed of knitted loops l consisting of needle wales and sinker wales produced in a customary manner course after course upon a single set of needles throughout the entire extent of the fabric excepting that I form two longitudinally extending areas (which either by the process ofknitting or by subsequent cutting become the longitudinally extending or lateral edges of the fabric), which longitudinally extending areas are composed entirely of rib knitting, being formed of needle wales 2 made upon one of the set of needles and needlewales 3 formed upon the other set of needles.

While the product of my invention may be produced in several ways, I have in Fig. 1 shown a plain knitted fabric having rib knit, longitudinally extending, lateral, edge portions. The plain knit portion A, extending between the two, longitudinal, lateral edge, rib knit portions B, C and the said rib knit, lateral edge portions B, C, are all produced as a unitary knitted fabric upon a circular, so-called body machine, which may be of the Wildman or any other well known type. Such machines are of different diameters and, according to the desired width of the final fabric of my invention, the knitting machine upon which the fabric of my invention is produced is provided at one or more relatively narrowareas or zones only, throughout the circle or single set of needles, with a second, intersecting set of needles to create the rib knit areas B, C, or only a single area B or C if desired. That is to say, the tubular fabric shown in Fig. 2 is knitted upon a single set of needles only, throughout the areas A, A, and is knittedin rib knitting, such as oneand-one rib or two-and-onerib, throughout the areas B and C. Obviously, in a tube of greater diameter there may be more longitudinally extending, rib knit areas than the two shown in Fig. 2 at B and C, this depending upon the diameter of the machine and the desired width of thefinal product.

The loops of the plain knit portion A of Fig. 1 represent the face of a plain knit fabric and such loop structure corresponds with that shown in Fig. 2, page 11 of the publication fFlat Machine Knitting and Fabrics, by H. D. Buck, 1921, Bragdon, Lord and Nagle Company, 334 Fourth Avenue, New York, publishers, and the loops of the rib knit portions B, C correspond with the structure shown in Fig. 24 of the said H. D. Buck publication.

The tubular fabric shown in Fig. 2 is thereafter cut along two lines 4, -5 which are desirably median lines through the rib knit areas B, C, so as to provide, in the case of Fig. 2, two flat pieces of knitted fabric which (except for the two, longitudinally extending, rib knit areas B, C) isformed wholly of. plain knitting, said rib knit areas 13, C being, in the case of the construction shown-in Figs. 1 and 2, provided with cut edges. 7

upon acircular machine having independent needles of the latch needle or spring beard type, the

, or single rows of "latch or spring "beard needles to produce the plain fabric, but having two sets The fabric of my invention maybe produced of needles to produce the rib knit area or areas areas E and F of Fig. 3 are the same in structure as the structure of the rib knit sections B and C of Fig. 1, excepting that since the fabric of Fig. 3 is knitted back and forth as a fiat piece of goods upon a single bank or set of needles, the yarn at the end of each course is returned into the fabric for the creation of the next course, and so on throughout the fabric. The result is therefore, in Fig. 3, to create the two rib knit areas E and F with true selvages 6, 1, whereas in Fig. 1

the edges 8, 9 are cut edges, since the fabric of Fig. 1 is knitted from a tube and is then out along a desirably median line of the longitudinally extending rib knit area.

If the fabric of my invention is produced as described with respect to Fig. 3, it will be understood that at both longitudinal edge portions'of the fabric, in order to produce the fabric, there are inserted in the machine, as upon a dial structure or in other suitable manner, additional needles of the same character, alternating in a one-andone relation or a two-and-one relation, etc; with the main or cylinder set of needles of the machine.

Moreover, and referring now to Fig. 4, my invention is in no wise limited to the knitting of the goods with true selvage edges 6, 1 at the outer edge of each of the two rib knit areas E, F, as the flat knit goods may be knitted of greater width or of any desired width, and at any desired areas I may introduce needles of the second set to produce ribbed work along several longitudinally extending areas, as many as may be desired, and I subsequently out such flat knit fabric longitudinally through all of such rib knit areas excepting of course the two actual selvage areas at the lateral, longitudinal, rib knit areas. Such a fabric is indicated in Fig. 4, wherein the entire fabric is knitted as a flat piece of goods but with plain knit areas such as A, A, A and rib knit areas G. H. I, J, of which the rib knit areas G and J have true selvages and the rib knit areas H, I

are subsequently cut along desirably median lines h, i, similarly to the cutting of the rib knit areas B and C of Fig. 2 along the desirably median lines 4 and 5 thereof.

My invention, while in no wise limited thereto, is primarily adapted to the production of circular knit goods of the type indicated in Fig. 2 and from which the flat piece of fabric of Fig. 1 and another like piece are produced. Among the fabrics which may be produced as fiat knit goods, a indicated in Figs. 3 and 4, are wool sweaters.

The flat knit fabric shown in Figs. 3 and 4 may be knitted in the general manner of full fashioned hosiery upon a fiat set of fixed spring beard needles and co-acting instrumentalities, excepting that no narrowing or shaping of the fabric is involved.

My invention, as stated, is not limited to the production of the described fabric by latch needles as the same may be produced by spring beard needles, either circularly arranged or in a flat set or sets and independent or fixed, and

- my invention may be practiced in the production 4 fabrics with electric knives.

of knitted fabrics upon certain other types of knitting machines, including warp knitting machines and-machines for knitting single or twobar tricot fabrics. In other words, my invention,

with respect to the fabric, pertains primarily to the production of a fabric which, except for the longitudinally extending or lateral edge portions, is plain knit, and in such longitudinally extending, lateral edge portions (which extend lengthwise the wales of the fabric, throughout any suitable number of wales) is rib knit regardless of the actual character of the plain knit stitches and of the rib knit stitches and regardless'of whether or not there are stitch variations in the plainknit portion and/ or in the rib knit portions and regardless of whether ornot other threads are knitted into the fabric, as, for example, warp threads orplating yarns or other yarns or threads. 7 i

My invention, both as to fabric and method, is independent of the actual means needed to carry out the method of making the fabric, whether the needles be independent or be fixed, and whether they be latch needles or spring beard needles, and regardless of the exact manner in which the intersecting needles, needed in the production of rib knit areas, are supported and operated. r

In those embodiments of my invention wherein the fabric is cut, it may be cut at any desired time or stage of the entire operation The described fabric, however produced, may be coated upon the back thereof with rubber or some other material, as by means of calender rolls, and in Fig. 5 I have indicated the back of the fabric to show an applied rubber coating. K, but with a part of the said coating K broken away to indicate the character of the knitted fabric at L.

The longitudinally extending or lateral, rib knit, edge portions of the fabric of my invention are also of advantage in preventing curling when a series or multiplicity of such fabrics are laid one upon another to any desired thickness of the resulting mass before cutting such mass of laid-up In fact the rib knit, longitudinally extending edges, whether of a true selvage construction, or cut as described with respect to Figs. 1 and 2, have the same relative advantages of woven selvages on woven goods though, of course, the character of the knitted fabric of my invention is clearly distinguished from a woven fabric.

I have obtained excellent results in securing non-curling side edges by knitting about one to one and a half inches (coursewise) of each of such edges in one-and-one rib, as well as in twoand-one ib knitting, the rest of the fabric of that ultimate piece being plain knit. While the exact width (coursewise) of the rib knit areas may be varied within the scope of my invention, it should in any case be substantial to eifect the purposes of my invention. In those cases (as in Fig. 2) where the fabric is knitted as a tube with one or more longitudinally extending, rib knit areas to be cut along a median line or lines, the width of each such area in the uncut condition is, of course, twice the width of the ultimate noncurling, rib knit edge, and hence in the example just stated it would be about two to three inches. This would also be true of the fabric of my invention when knitted fiat and of such width as to have one or more longitudinally extending, rib knit areas between the actual edge portions, as in Fig. 4, which .is or are to be out along longiatlas s tudinal; lines The fabric is: i indef ni e len th relative, Widths, coursewise, of the rib knit areas and. the plain knit areas, and aretherefore to be regarded as mainly diagrammatic. The width (coursewise) of the plain knit areas very largely exceeds that of the rib knit areas, depending upon the diameter of the needle cylinder, if the fabric is knitted as indicated in Fig. 2, which needle cylinder diameter may be, for example, 1 4 or 18 or 22 inches (as referred to on page 30 of Knitting, by Metcalf, published in 1909), and also depending upon. the lengthwise extending cuts of the tubular fabric, which number may be one only or may be more than one,

Having thus described several embodiments of the fabric of my invention and the best methods known to me for producing the same, it is to be understood that although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sensev and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being set forth in the following claims.

I claim:

1. An integral plain-knit fabric of indefinite length which, excepting only for its walewise extending, relatively narrow, opposite, free, side edge portions is plain knit, the said relatively narrow opposite side edge portions being each of substantial width in a cours'ewise direction but relatively narrow in comparison with the total width of the fabric, and being rib knitted and thereby rendered non-curling by reason of the drawing of the yarn of the fabric to opposite faces of the fabric by the needlesin the knitting of such rib knit edge portions, the width of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merely very largely exceeded by the width of the plain knit portion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so thatthe character or structure of the fabric is that of a plain knit fabric with merely rib knit lateral edges.

2. An integral plain-knit fabric of indefinite length which, excepting only for its Walewise extending, relatively-narrow, opposite, free side edge portions is plain knit, the said relativelynarrow opposite side edge portions being each of substantial width in a coursewise direction but relatively narrow in comparison with the total width of the fabric, and being rib knitted and thereby rendered non-curling by reason ofthe drawing of the yarn of the fabric to opposite faces of the fabric by the needles in the knitting of such rib knit edge portions, the width of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merely sufficient to create non-curling edges and being very largely exceeded by the width of the plain knit portion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structure of the fabric isthat of a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges, the extreme outer edge of each of said rib knit edge portions being cut in a direction normal to the courses to create such extreme outer relatively-narrow edges from the fabric as originally knitted.

3. An integral plain-knit fabric of indefinite length which, excepting only for its walewise extending, reiatively-narrow, opposite, free side edge portions is plain knit, the said relativelynarrow opposite side edge portions being eachof substantial width in a courseW-ise direction but relatively narrow in comparison with the total width of the fabric, and being rib knitted and "8 thereby renderedncn-curling by reason oft-he drawing of the yarn of the fabric to oppositefaces of the fabric by the needles in; the knitting of such relatively-narrow rib knit edge portions, the yarn in such rib knit edge portions being: at

the end of each course thereof returned, into the next succeeding course, in the knitting operation, thereby creating opposite, non-cut, true selvage edges, the width of each side-edge ribsufficient to create non-curling edges and being knit portion being merely sufiicient to create non curling edges and being very largely exceeded by the width of the plain knit portion constituting allbut the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structureof the fabric is that of a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges.

4. integral plain-knit, tubular knitted fab,-

ric of indefinite length knitted throughout in plain knitting excepting only for at least one walewise extending relatively-narrow area of rib knit structure knitted throughout the length of the fabric and which rib knit area is of substantial width in a coursewise direction, but relatively narrow in compariscn'with' the total width of the fabric which is adapted to be out across the courses thereof throughout the longitudinal extent of the fabric so'as when so out to provide two opposite relatively-narrow lateral edge portions for the resulting fabric, each such edge portion being of non-curling characteristics by reason of the drawing of the yarn of the fabric to opposite faces of the fabric by the needles in the knitting of such subsequently cut, rib knit but the said merely edge'portions, so that the a character or structure of the fabric isthatof a'plain-knit fabric with'merely rib-kmt lateral edges.

5. An integral plain-knit flat-knit fabric of indefinite length. which throughout its entire lengthwise and lateral extent is plain knit excepting for its lateral relatively-narrow edge portions which are of rib knit structure and excepting forat least one Wale-wise extending relatively-narrow area also of rib knit structure knitted throughout the length of the fabric and which rib knit area is of substantialfwiidthin a coursewise direction, and is adapted to be cut across the courses thereof throughout the longitudinal extent of the fabric so as when so cut to provide two opposite relativelysnarrow lateral edge portions for two of the resultingfabrics each having one rib knit relatively narrow' lateral edge portion with the yarn at the outer end of each course thereof returned into the next succeeding course in the knitting operation, thereby creating a non-cut true selvage edge, and having one relatively-narrow rib-knit lateral edge portion cut in a direction normal to the courses to create the other relatively-narrow lateral edge of such fabric, the said Opposite relatively-narrow ed es of ac .o ch es l fabr cs being rendered nonecurling by reason of the drawing of the yarn of the fabric to opposite faces of the fabric by the needles in the knitting of such rib knit edge portions thereof, the width of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merely sufiicient to create non-curling edges and being very largely exceeded by the width of the; plain knitp ortion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structure of the fabric is that of a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges.

-6. An integral plain-knit fiat-knit fabric of indefinite length which throughout its entire lengthwise and lateral extent is plain knit excepting for its lateral relatively-narrow edge portions which are of rib knit structure and excepting for a plurality of walewise extending relatively-narrow areas also of rib knit structure knitted throughout the length of the fabric, and which rib knit areas are of substantial width in a coursewise direction-and are adapted to be cut across the courses thereof throughout the longitudinal extent of the fabric so as when so cut to provide two opposite relatively-narrow lateral edge portions for one of the resulting fabfics,- at least two other of the resulting fabrics each having one rib-knit relatively-narrow lateral edge portion with the yarn at the outer end of each course thereof returned into the next succeeding course in the knitting operation, thereby creating a non-cut true selvage edge, and having one relatively-narrow rib-knit lateral edge portion cut in a direction normal to the courses to create the other relatively-narrow lateral edge of such fabric, the said opposite edges of each of such resulting fabrics being rendered non-curling by reason of the drawing of the yarn of the fabric to opposite faces of the fabric by the needles in the knitting of such rib-knit edge portions thereof, the width of each side-edge ribknit portion being merely suflicient to create noncurling edges and being very largely exceeded by the width of the plain knit portion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structure of the fabric is that of a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges.

7. An integral plain-knit fabric of indefinite length which, excepting only for its walewise extending, relatively narrow, opposite, free, side edge portions is plain knit, the said relatively narrow opposite side edge portions being each of substantial width in a coursewise direction but relatively narrow in comparison with the total width of the fabric, and being rib knitted and thereby rendered non-curling by reason of the drawing of the yarn of the fabric to opposite faces of the fabric by the needles in the knitting of such rib knit edge portions, the width of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merely sufiicient to create non-curling edges and being very largely exceeded by the width of the plain knit portion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structure of the fabric is that of a plain knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges, the back of said fabric having an applied coating.

8. An integral plain-knit fabric of indefinite length which, excepting only for its walewise extending, relatively narrow, opposite, free, side edge portions in plain knit, the said relatively narrow opposite side edge portions being each of substantial width in a coursewise direction but relatively narrow in comparison with the total width of the fabric, and being rib knitted and thereby rendered non-curling by reason of the drawing of the yarn of the fabric to opposite faces of the fabric by the needles in the knitting of such rib knit edge portions, the width of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merely sufficient to create non-curling edges and being very large ly exceeded by the width of the plain knit portion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structure of 10' the fabric is that of a plain knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges, the back of said fabric having an applied rubber-containing coatmg.

9. That method of knitting a unitary plain-knit fabric of indefinite length with relatively narrow, non-curling, walewise extending, opposite side edge portions, but otherwise of plain knitting to provide a plain-knit fabric with merely rib knit lateral edges, which consists in knitting such fabric of plain knitting throughout its lateral extent course-after-course throughout its length excepting for such walewise extending, opposite, relatively narrow, side-edge portions, the width of each of which side-edge portions is merely sufficient to create non-curling edges and being very greatly exceeded in width by the width of such plain-knit intermediate portion, and in forming by rib knitting during such course-aftercourse knitting such walewise extending, relatively-narrow, opposite side edge portions, and while in so forming by rib knitting said edge portions, thereby drawing the yarn of the fabric throughout said opposite side edge rib-knit portions to the opposite faces of the fabric by the needles, to prevent curling of said side edge portions, the width of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merelysuflicient to create non-curling edges and being very largely exceeded by the width of the plain-knit portion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structure of the fabric is that of a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges.

10. That method of knitting a unitary plainknit fabric of indefinite length with relativelynarrow non-curling, walewise extending, opposite side edge portions, but otherwise of plain knitting to provide a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges, which consists in knitting such fabric as a plain knit tube, but in the continuous knitting of such tube, knitting at least one walewise extending relatively-narrow area in rib knitting, and in such rib, knitting thereby drawing the yarn of the fabric .by the needles to the opposite faces of the fabric, and cutting the tubular knit fabric in a lengthwise direction through such relatively-narrow rib knit area or areas, thereby to provide at least one plainknit flat fabric having rib knit, walewise extending, side edge portions, rendered non-curling by reason of said rib knit areas, the width of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merely sufficient to create non-curling edges and being very large- 1y exceeded by the width of the plain-knit portion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structure of the fabric is that of a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges.

11. That method of knitting a unitary plainknit fabric of indefinite length with relativelynarrow non-curling, walewise extending, op'oosite side edge portions but otherwise of plain knitting to provide a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges, which consists in knitting such fabric as a plain knit tube, but in the continuous knitting of such tube knitting a plurality of walewise extending relatively-narrow areas in rib knitting, and in such rib knitting thereby drawing the yarn of the fabric by the needles to the opposite faces of the fabric, and cutting the tubular knit fabric in a lengthwise direction through each of such relatively-narrow rib knit, walewise extending areas, thereby to provide a plurality of plain-knit fiatfabrics of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merely sufficient to create non-curling edges and being very largely exceeded by the width of the plainknit portion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structure of, the fabric is that of a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges.

, 12. That method of knitting a unitary plainknit fabric of indefinite length with relativelynarrow non-curling, walewise extending, opposite side edge portions but otherwise of plain knitting to provide a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges, which consists in knitting such fabric of plain knitting as a fiat-knit fabric with opposite selvage edges throughout its lateral extent course-after-course throughout its length excepting for such walewise extending, opposite, relatively-narrow side edge portions, and in forming by rib knitting during such course-after-course knitting such walewise extending, relatively-narrow, opposite side edge portions, and while in so forming by rib knitting said relatively-narrow, side edge portions, thereby drawing the yarn of the fabric throughout said opposite side edge rib-knit portions to the opposite faces of the fabric by the needles, to prevent curling of said side edge portions, the width of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merely sufiicient to create non-curling edges and being very largely exceeded by the width of the plain-knit portion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structure of the fabric is that of a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges.

13. That method of knitting a unitary plainknit fabric of indefinite length with relativelynarrow non-curling, walewise extending, opposite side edge portions but otherwise of plain knitting toprovide a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges, which consists in knitting such fabric of plain knitting as a flat knit fabric with opposite selvage edges, throughout its lateral extent course-after-course throughout its length, excepting for such walewise extending relatively-narrow, opposite side edge por tions and for at least one intermediate walewise extending relatively-narrow area continuing throughoutv the lengthcf the fabric, and in forming by rib knittingduring such course-after course: knitting the said relatively-narrow, selvage edge portions and theme or morerelativelynarrow, intermediate areas, and in such rib knitting thereby drawing. the yarn of. the fabric by the needles to the opposite faces of the fabric, the

width of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merely suificient to create non-curling edges and being very largely exceeded by the Width of the: plain-knit portion constituting all but the saidmerely edge portions, so that the character or structure of the fabric is that of a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges.

14. That method of knitting a, unitary plainknit fabric of indefinite length with relatively-- narrow non-curling, walewise extending, opposite side edge portions but otherwise of plain knitting to provide a plain-knit fabric with merely rib-knit lateral edges, which consists in knitting such fabric of plain knitting as a flat knit fabric with opposite selvage edges, throughout its lateral extent course-after-course throughout itslength, excepting for such walewise extending relatively-narrow, opposite side edge. portions and for at least one intermediate walewise extend ing relatively-narrow area continuing throughout the length of the fabric, and, in forming by rib knitting during such course-after-course knitting the said relatively-narrow, selvage edge portions and the. one or more relatively-narrow, intermediate areas, and in such 'rib knitting thereby drawing the yarn of the fabric by the needles to the opposite faces of the fabric, and cutting the fiat knit fabric in a lengthwise direction through the intermediate, walewise extending area or areas, thereby to provide a plurality of flat knit fabrics each having rib knit, walewise. extending, relatively-narrow, side. edge portions rendered non-curling by reason of said ribknit areas, the width of each side-edge rib-knit portion being merely suificient to create non-curling edges and being very largely exceeded by the width of the plain-knit portion constituting all but the said merely edge portions, so that the character or structure of the fabric is that of a plain-knit fabric withv merely rib-knit lateral edges.

15. A method in accordance with claim 9, but including as an additional step applying a coating to the back of the knitted fabric.

16. A method in accordance with. claim 11, but including as an additional. step applying a coating to the back of each of the plurality of resulting ilat fabrics.

17.. A method in accordance with claim 1.4, but including as an additional step applying a coat,- ing to. the back of each of the plurality of result.- ing flat knit fabrics. 7 r

BROOKS.- STEVENS, JR.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2535991 *Sep 23, 1948Dec 26, 1950Lawrence Mfg CompanyCircular, independent needle, knitting machine
US2706699 *Jan 2, 1952Apr 19, 1955Fed Leather CompanyMethod of making a highly stretchable laminated knitted fabric
US2755535 *Mar 5, 1953Jul 24, 1956Ind Rayon CorpCoated flexible fabric
US3010181 *Apr 15, 1958Nov 28, 1961 Method of producing knitted yardage
US3066511 *Apr 6, 1959Dec 4, 1962Wildman Jacquard CoMethod of knitting
US4150581 *Aug 27, 1973Apr 24, 1979Walters Howard GBelt for transport of materials and transmission of power
US4198834 *May 15, 1978Apr 22, 1980Carolon CompanyElastic stocking with circumferentially adjustable upper thigh
US4888229 *Apr 8, 1988Dec 19, 1989The Texwipe CompanyWipers for cleanroom use
US5438852 *Apr 12, 1994Aug 8, 1995The Bentley-Harris Manufacturing CompanySelf-gripping textile gasket
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/193, 66/200, 66/172.00R
International ClassificationD04B1/00, D06C25/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/00, D06C25/00
European ClassificationD04B1/00, D06C25/00