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Publication numberUS2414933 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1947
Filing dateJun 2, 1944
Priority dateJun 2, 1944
Publication numberUS 2414933 A, US 2414933A, US-A-2414933, US2414933 A, US2414933A
InventorsGordon E Daniels
Original AssigneeGordon E Daniels
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dirt scraper
US 2414933 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. '28, 1947. G. E.DANIELYS DIRT SCRAPER Filed June 2, 1944 5 Sheets-Shet l I INVENTOR. I E. DAN/a5 I BY Z M Jan. 28, 1947. D s Q 2,414,933

DIRT SCRAPER Filed June 2, 1944 asheets-shet 2 INVENTOR.

602m E DAN/[LS I Jan. 28,1947. e. E.DAN IELS I 2,414,933

DIRT SCRAPER Filed June 2, 1944 3 Sheets-Sheet 3- Fig. 4.

INVEN TOR. 60000 E. DAN/H5 Patented Jan. 28,1947

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE DIRT SCRAPER Gordon E. Daniels, Nashville, Tenn.

Application June 2, 1944, Serial No. 538,486

6 Claims.

This invention relates to dirt scrapers and particularly to scrapers of the carry-all type in which a scraper body having a scraping edge associated therewith is pulled along the ground to accumulate dirt scraped by the edge within the body.

One bject of the present invention is to simplify the controls necessary to manipulate a scraper of the above type.

Another object is to provide common means for operating both the front and rear bowls or receptacles of a scraper of the above type in proper coordination.

Another object is to reduce wear on the cable and sheaves of a cable system for a dirt scraper or the like.

Another object is to provide a simple and compact dirt scraper which is easy and economical to manufacture.

The manner in which the above and other objects of the invention are accomplished will be readily understood on reference to the following specification when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a dirt scraper embodying the present invention, illustrating the same in digging position.

Fig. 2 is a sectional elevational view of the scraper, illustrating the same in discharging position.

Fig. 3 is a sectional plan view taken substantially along the lines 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a front view of the upper sheave assembly and is taken in the direction of the arrow 4 of Fig. 2.

The scraper comprises a rear bowl or receptacle II and a forward apron, bowl or receptacle l2 mounted on a frame including a rear section I3 and a forward section l4. The bowl II and apron l2 have overlapping sides Ila and I2a, respectively, to laterally retain scraped material accumulated therein. The forward frame section includes a pair of rearwardly extended arms [5 integrally connected through a tubular cross member Hi to a post l1 having a socket at the lower end thereof in which is fitted a bearing pin I8 extending from a bearing block l9 (Fig. 3). The latter is located in a well formed .in a front axle 2| and has trunnion pins mounted in bearings formed in the axle 2| to permit front wheels 22 which are attached to the axle in any suitable manner to follow any uneven ground surface. Brackets 23 extending from the axle 2| support a pivot rod 24 on which are pivoted the ends of a bifurcated draft bar 25. The draft Secured between the rearwardly extending arms 15 of the front frame section is a mold board 34 on which is securely mounted in any suitable manner a scraping blade 35 adapted to be inserted in the ground as shown in Fig. 1 to scrape the ground and guide such scraped material upwardly into the body of the scraper as formed by the receptacles H and 12. A pivot rod 36 is fastened between the arms [5 directly ad- .jacent the mold board 34 and forms a pivotal support for the rear receptacle ll, enabling the same to be moved \between its positions illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2.

Pivot pins 31 attached to the sides of the receptacle ll pivotally support the front apron l2 at its sides and adjacent its rear end. The forward end of the front apron I2 is supported from the front frame section l4 by a pair of links'38 pivoted at 39 to the arms 15 and provided with elongated slots 40 at the upper ends thereof which embrace pins extending from the sides I20. of the apron I2. I

Means are provided for moving the receptacle II and apron I2 from their digging positions shown in Fig. l to their discharging positions shown in Fig. 2. Attached to the rear receptacle II are posts 42 terminating in a support for a sheave 43 around which is wrapped a cable 44 suitably anchored at 45 to a truss 46 extending upwardly from the front frame section 14. The

cable 44 passes over a, sheave 41, rotatably mounted on a shaft I41 carried at the upper end of truss 46, and thence passes over a second sheave 48 and under a third sheave 49. The free end of the cable is suitably connected to a winch mounted on and driven by said tractor. Since such tractor operated winches are well known in the art it is deemed not necessary to illustrate the same.

As the cable 44 is drawn forward by the tractor winch the receptacle ll rocks about the pivot rod 36. forcing the pivot pins 31 to move the front apron l2 forwardly. The latter rises somewhat into the position shown in Fig. 2 by virtue of the rocking of links 38 so that both bowl I I and apron I2 assume a discharging position in which their adjacent edges II I and H2, respectively, are separated and the planes of their floors or bottom surfaces assume angular positions favorable to the discharge of scraped material contained therein. Upon releasing the cable 44 the receptacle and apron movetoward their loading position shown in Fig. l byvirtue of their weight until lugs 50 adjacent the lower end of the posts 42 strike bottoming plates 5| suitably fastened to the beams thereby limiting counterclockwise rocking of the receptacle II.

Means are provided for raising and lowering the frame whereby to move the scraper blade into different positions relative to the ground and also to locate the receptacle II and apron I2 in digging and transporting positions. A second cable 52 is anchored at 53 to the front cross-beam 28 of the rear frame section I3 and passes around two sets of sheaves I53 and 54, the former being rotatably mounted on shaft I41 while the latter setof sheaves is mounted on brackets 55 fastened to the cross-beam 28. The cable 52 then passes over a sheave I55, coaxial with sheave 48, and under a sheave 56. substantially coaxially with sheave 49. The free end of the cable 52 is attached to a second winch carried by the tractor.

As the cable 52 is drawn forwardly, the rear frame section It is rockedcounterclockwise about the pivotpins 5| relative to the front frame section, thus raising the receptacle II, apron I2 and scraper blade 35 from the position shown in Fig. 1. It will be noted thatthis action will cause the pivot rod 35 to rise a greater amount than the lugs which are guided by the beams26, thereby (due to rocking of arms I5 about pivots 3|) causing rearward movement of receptacle II along beams Ziicausing receptacle I2 to rock links-38counterclockwise. This causes a relative clockwise rocking of the receptacle I2 about pivot 3'! bringing the edge I I2 (Fig. 2) towardthe edge III of receptacle I I so as to close the opening between the receptacle and the apron.

When it is desired to move the-scraperin-to a digging or loading position, the cable52-is released allowing the weight of the frame sections I3 and I4 to move the scraping blade 35 into the ground so that subsequent forward movement of the scraper will accumulate scraped material into the receptacle II and apron I2.= The slots ll in links 38 permit theapron I2 to freely rise or ride over any large boulders or mounds of earth as the scraper is pulled-forwardly during adigging operation.

Referring in particular to Figs. 2 and 4 the sheaves 4El and I55 are suspended for universal movement from a cross-piece 51 mounted on posts .58 attached to the front post IT. For this purpose th sheave block 5970f each sheave isfixed to a U shaped bar 50 interlocked with a second U-shaped bar 5i; secured as by welding-to the cross-piece 51. This construction enables each sheave andits block to automatically align itself into any position universally (within certain limits) according to the components of any'reactive force s occurring in the cable system.

The lower sheaves 49 and 56 (see also Fig. 3) are similarly mounted for universal movement. In this case,.the sheave block I II! for each sheave is integrally mounted on a rod BZ-terminating in ail-shapedbaffiB embracing th pivot bar 24 for the draft bar 25." The universal connection thus formed enables the sheaves 49 and-5511c align themselves in such a position so as to minimize any side thrust by the cables which might otherwise develop, particularly when the scraper is to be turned.

It will be seen from the above that the combined universal supports for the two sets of sheaves 48-I55 and 45-56 provides a simple sheave construction which eliminates any side thrust or other undesirable conditions in the cable system.

In lieu of the type of universal suspension illustrated in the present drawings, a flexible cable device as illustrated at 35 (Fig. 2) in my copending application Serial No. 520,167, filed January 29, 1944, may be used. For example the rod 62 may be substituted by a cable or other similar flexible element of similar length.

The present invention forms a continuation-inpart of said application Serial No. 520,167.

Having thus described the invention what I claim as new. and desire to secure by Letters Patentis:

l. A dirt scraper comprising a frame, a rear receptacle pivotally supported by said frame, a

.front receptacle pivotally connected to said rear receptacle, a link pivotally connected adjacent the lower end thereof to said frame and adjacent theupper end thereof to said front receptacle for supporting the latter, and means for rocking said rear receptacle whereby to rockboth said receptacles.

2. A dirt scraper comprising a frame, a rear receptacle pivotally supported by said frame, a front receptacle pivotally connected to said rear receptacle, a link pivotally connected adjacent one end thereof to said frame and pivotally connected adjacent theother end thereof to said front receptacle for supporting said front receptacle, one of said last two mentioned pivotal connectio'nslcomprising a pin and slot connection for permitting limited relative movement between said front receptacle and said frame along a line passingv through said two last-mentioned pivotal connections, and means for rocking one of said receptacles whereby to rock both said receptacles.

3. A dirtscraper comprising a frame, ascraper blade carried by said frame, a rear receptacle pivotally supported by said frame for movement about an axis adjacent said blade, a front receptacle pivotally connected to said rear receptacle adjacent the rear end of said front receptacle, a link pivotally connected between said frame and said front receptacle adjacent the front thereof for supporting said front receptacle and means for rocking said rear receptacle whereby to rockboth said. receptacles.

4. Acdirt scraper comprising -a .first frame, a second frame pivotally connected thereto, a first receptacle, meanson said first frame pivotally supporting said first receptacle adjacent oneend thereof, means .on .saidrsecond. frameupivotally supporting said. first .receptacleadjacent the opposite end. thereof, a second receptacle pivotally connected'at oneend. thereof to said first receptacle adjacent said. opposite .end of said first. receptacle, means .on' said. -second frame. pivotally Y supporting saidcsecond receptacleadjacent the oppositeend thereof," and means for. rocking one of said. frames relative tothe other.

5. Asdirt scraper comprising aLIearWheel'supportedframe, a front wheel supported frame pivotally connectedto saidrear frame and including aportion extending rearwardlyof said pivotal connection; a rear. receptacle pivotally supported by-said-front frame'at said "extending portion thereof, a front receptacle pivotally connected to said rear receptacle, a link pivotally connected adjacent the lower end thereof to said front frame and adjacent the upper end thereof to said front receptacle for supporting the latter, means for rocking said rear receptacle whereby to rock both said receptacles, and means for raising the pivotally connected portions of said frames whereby to raise said receptacles.

6. A dirt scraper comprising a rear wheel supported frame, a front wheel supported frame pivotally connected to said rear frame and including a portion extending rearwardly of said pivotal connection; a rear receptacle pivotally supported by said front frame at said extending portion thereof, a front receptacle pivotally connected to said rear receptacle, a link pivotally connected adjacent the lower end thereof to said front frame and adjacent the upper end thereof to said front receptacle for supporting the latter,

said last mentioned pivotal connection being located in front of said first mentioned pivotal connection for said rear receptacle, means for rocking said rear receptacle whereby to rock both said receptacles, and means for raising the pivotally connected portions of said frames whereby to raise said receptacles and to cause said front receptacle to rock toward said rear receptacle.

GORDON E. DANIELS.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2628815 *Apr 16, 1948Feb 17, 1953Bucyrus Erie CoFairlead for semitrailer scrapers or wagons
US2642293 *Nov 1, 1948Jun 16, 1953Reynolds Simmons LovelGuide sheave arrangement for control cable extending between tractor and trailer vehicles connected by a weight-transferrring hitch
US4393608 *Sep 3, 1981Jul 19, 1983Hodge John RLand forming and earth moving equipment
Classifications
U.S. Classification37/424
International ClassificationE02F3/64
Cooperative ClassificationE02F3/657, E02F3/65, E02F3/656, E02F3/6463
European ClassificationE02F3/65, E02F3/65H4, E02F3/65H6, E02F3/64T2