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Publication numberUS2415835 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 18, 1947
Filing dateFeb 4, 1941
Priority dateFeb 4, 1941
Publication numberUS 2415835 A, US 2415835A, US-A-2415835, US2415835 A, US2415835A
InventorsMoore James Ballard, Richard R Trexler
Original AssigneeMoore James Ballard, Richard R Trexler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid dispensing apparatus
US 2415835 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 18,1947. J. B 'MOORE ETAL 2,415,835

LIQUID yDISPENS ING APPARATUS f Filed Feb. 4, 1941 .z'sheets-'s'neet 1 v IZ j/Gfl. u

INVENTOR.

Feb. 18,V 1947.

.J. B. MOORE ErAL LIQUID DISPENSING APPARATUS 2 sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 4, 1941 Y fiile), ,r

Patented Feb. 18, 1947 UNITED STATES FATE? J ames Bailard Moore, Chicago, and Richard R. 'llrexler, Evanston, Ell.

Application February 4, 1941, Serial No. 377,346

(Cl. Z22-53) 6 Claims.

This invention relates to liquid dispensing apparatus, particularly of the type adapted for the dispensing of gasoline and the like.

It is an object of the invention to provide new and improved liquid dispensing apparatus adapted for the dispensing of gasoline and like volatile liquids, and more particularly to provide such apparatus including new and improved air and vapor elimination means.

More specifically stated, it is an object of the invention to provide liquid dispensing apparatus of the type stated wherein satisfactorily operable air and vapor eliminating means is arranged on the suction side of the pump whereby to permit the use of a measuring pump type of installation, thus dispensing with the meter conventionally provided. l

Still more specifically stated, it is an object of the invention to provide air and vapor eliminating means on the suction side of the pump wherein the elimination devices are arranged at the lowest point of pressure in the pump supply line whereby to effectively eliminate vapor and gas from the supply liquid, and wherein the rate of liquid flow into the pump is decreased to preclude the drawing of any vapor or gas into the pump measuring chambers.

Further objects of the invention are to provide improved means for withdrawing the separated gases and vapors, and the reclaimed liquids from the system; and also to provide in combination with the devices defined an improved type of measuring pump and driving mechanism therefor.

Various other objects, advantages and features of the invention will appear from the following specification when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein certain preferred embodiments are set forth for purposes of illustration.

In the drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout:

Fig. 1 is a general assembly View, partly in section, of a liquid dispensing apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a detail sectional view, on an enlarged scale, of the gas and vapor eliminating chamber or means, and the associated pump structure;

Fig. 3 is a detail view of the adjustment or Calibrating device for the pump;

Fig. 4 is a. sectional View through the pump structure on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2';

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. l, but showing a modied form of structure;

Fig. 6 is a detail view of the aspirator mechanism more particularly used with the structure of Fig. 5; and

Fig. '7 shows a further form oi modified structure.

This application is a continuation-impart of our copending application, Serial No. 248,378, filed December 30, 1938, and entitled Liquid dispensing apparatus.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, and first `to the embodiment illustrated in Figs. l to 4 inclusive, the invention is shown applied to an apparatus .for dispensing gasoline or ike volatile liquids. The structure comprises a suitable supply tank such as an underground tank il) having a filling pipe il and a vapor exhaust pipe l2. The pump suppiy pipe i3 provided with the usual foot valve it leads from the tank to an air and Vapor or gas eliminating structure generally indicated by the numeral l5, the details of which will be later described.

A measuring pump generally indicated at it, Fig. 2, is arranged in the lower part of the structure l5 and pumps the liquid therein to and through the pressure dispensing line ll terminating in the usual sight gauge i8, flexible hose I9 and nozzle 2i! having a control valve 2i.

The drive for the pump is preferably of the type 'shown vin the application of Richard R. Trexler, Serial No. 237,593, filed October 29, 1938, and entitled liquid dispensing apparatus. More particularly, the drive comprises a suitable prime mover such as an electric motor 2% having a control switch 26 controlled by the nozzle support 2l, the arrangement being such that the motor is energized when the nozzle is removed from the support and the support lifted and 'the motor deenergized when the support is lowered to nozzle supporting position as indicated in Fig. 1. -The motor, through a series of gears i8, 29 and Sil, is adapted to drive a differential gearing generally indicated by the numeral Si. This differential, which may be of standard type, is provided with a pair of output shafts 32 and the arrangement ybeing such that the driving motion of the gear it will be transmitted to shafts or 33, or both, as the case may be, as will be understood by those skilled in the art.

Shaft .32 is arranged to drive the main dispensing or measuring pump it, whereasI shaft 33 is arranged to drive an auxiliary pump 3d, preferablya gear pump, arranged to circulate liquid, preferably oil, in a closed control circuit Sii. This control circuit is provided with a spring-pressed relief valve 36, adjustably set to open at a predetermined pressure. The valve 36 sets up suiiicient resistance to flow within the circuit 35 s0 that normally, during dispensing, when the dispensing nozzle valve 2| is open, pump 34 and associated shaft 33 will be held stationary, the drive from the gear 33 being transmitted to shaft 32 to operate the dispensing pump I6 and effect the dispensing operation. However, when the nozzle Valve 2| is closed, pump l5 is locked from operation stopping shaft 32. Under such circumstances the drive from gear 39 is diverted through the diierential to shaft 33 causing the operation of pump 35 and overcoming the resistance of the relief valve 35. In other words, the valve 3B sets up resistance so that dispensing may be effected when the nozzle valve 2| is open, and while motor 25 is in operation, but when the nozzle valve is closed the relief valve 3S will yieldably open to permit the diversion of the power from the driving motor. Similarly, the dispensing nozzle valve 2| may be partially opened, in which event the driving motion of the gear 35 Will be transmitted to both shafts 32 and 33 in the desired proportion. By this means the motor 25 may be set in operation, and continuously operated, while the nozzle is o its support 21, but motion from thev motor is transmitted to the dispensing pump IE only when the nozzle valve is open and while liquid is actually being dispensed. Further, the movements of the pump I6 are proportional to the amount of liquid dispensed, and hence the pump acts as a measuring means as well as a propelling pump, permitting the conventionally provided meter to be eliminated.

Dispensing pump shaft 32 is arranged by means of driving connections 45 and 4| to drive suitable registering mechanism such as a volume register 42 and a cost register 43 and it will be noted that the registering mechanism is thus geared to the measuring pump i6 and movable therewith to register its operations. Volume register 42 is directly connected 'to drive shaft 4| by means of connections 44, whereas the cost register 43 is connected to the shaft 4| through the intermediary of a change speed gearing 45 by which the unit cost of the dispensed gasoline may be varied.

Referring more particularly to the air and vapor eliminating structure I5, as illustrated in Figs. l and 2, it will be seen that this structure comprises a vertically elongated chamber 58 adapted to form a reservoir for the liquid on the inlet side of the pump. The supply line I3 leads to the chamber adjacent the upper part thereof, whereas the pump is located in the lower part of the chamber or reservoir. Further, the upper part of the chamber is provided with an eliminating pipe 5| having a restricted orice 52, and leading to a recovery chamber 53, throughwhich air, gasoline vapor, and other gases separated from the liquid within the chamber 50 are adapted to be exhausted. Recovery chamber 53 is provided with two outlets, a gas outlet 54 leading to atmosphere, and a liquid outlet 55 returning to the supply line |3. A small pump 56 of the type suitable for the pumping of gases, and a small pump 51 of the type suitable for the pumping of liquids, are arranged in conduits 54 and 55, respectively, these pumps being driven by driving connections 58 and 59 powered from the motor driven shaft 29'. Conduits 54 and 55 are also preferably provided, respectively, with check valves 6B and 6|, these valves being so disposed as to permit gas or liquid, as the case may be, to flow outwardly from the recovery chamber 53, but preventing reverse now thereto. Recovery chamber 53 is also provided with a iloat 62 having associated valves 63 and 64, for controlling and maintaining a predetermined liquid body 55 Within the recovery chamber.

In the operation of the gas eliminating structure, air and vapor separating from the liquid within the chamber 50 passes through the restricted orifice 52 and the pipe 5| into the recovery chamber 53. When no gas, Whether air or Vapor, is present in the chamber 5B, then liquid Will pass through the pipe 5I, but owing to the presence or the orifice 52, only a small amount of such liquid will be permitted to escape. The orice permits the relatively free passage of gas, but permits only a small liquid flow. In the recovery chamber the gases and liquids are separated, the gases being drawn outwardly by pump 56 to atmosphere through the exhaust pipe 54, and the reclaimed liquids being returned by pump 51 through conduit 55 to the supply line |3. Float 62, through the action of its Valve 53 which closes conduit 54 when the float is raised, and its valve 54 which closes conduit 55 when the float is lowered, maintains a predetermined liquid body within the recovery chamber. While the separator chamber 59 is below atmospheric pressure, the suction pumps 55 and 51 maintain the pressure within the recovery chamber at a lower level, thus insuring the proper functioning of the apparatus. Check valves 60 and 6| prevent any reverse flow within conduits 54 and 55. It is also to be noted that the pumps 56 and 51 are driven at all times while the motor 25 is in operation, and before the movement of the dispensing pump I5 begins.

The structure of the dispensing pump is best shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 4. The pump comprises a casing 1|) provided with a series of radially arranged cylinders 1|, four in number in the particular embodiment illustrated, as shown in Fig. 4. Each cylinder has' a piston 12 operated .by a connecting rod 13, the rods being mounted by a series of superposed sleeves upon an operating crank pin 14. The crank pin is carried by a block 15, Fig. 3, adjustably mounted in an arm 16 secured to the drive shaft 32. The adjustable positioning of the crank pin relative to its driving arm 16 is controlled by means of an adjustment screw 11, and by means of this adjustment the throw of the crank pin may be changed whereby to accurately adjust the displacement of the pump. The pump structure is in many respects similar to that described in the copending appli* cation of Richard R. Trexler, Serial No. 268,551, filed April 18, 1939, and entitled Liquid dispensing apparatus, now issued as Patent 2,390,136 of December 4, 1945, and may incorporate bellows or diaphragm type pistons such as therein disclosed. Each cylinder is provided With -a spring-.pressed inlet valve leading directly from the chamber 50 into the cylinder, and with a spring-pressed outlet valve 3| leading from the cylinder to an annular chamber or casing 82 connected to the pressure .dispensing line l1.. As each piston 12 moves radially inwardly, its associated inlet valve 80 will be opened against the pressure of its closing spring, Whereas as the piston moves outwardly, its associated exhaust valve 8| will be opened against its closing spring, in a, manner which will be understood by those skilled in the art.

It is to be noted that in accordance With the present invention the dispensing and measuring pump I6 is carried as a part of and located at the bottom of the elongated and relatively enlarged separator chamber 50. As the result a relative pressure is impressed upon the pump by the head of liquid within the reservoir or chamber 50 so that the point of minimum pressure in the system is not immediately at the inlet of the pump, but is rather in the upper portion of the separator chamber Eil. In other words, the pressure at the pump inlet is above that existing in the upper part of the chamber 50, and Vaporizing and the like of the liquid caused by vacuum conditions will, as a result, take place in the upper portions of the chamber rather than at the pump inlet. Moreover, the pump being in effect immersed within the chamber 50, there are no restricted passages or conduits connecting the chamber and the pump wherein pressure drop due to rate of uid flow may be introduced. On the contrary, the pressure head oi liquid within the chamber 5B is directly impressed upon the inlet ports of the pump. Additionally, the reduction ofthe rate of liquid ow into the pump permits any air or Vapor forming in the liquid in the lower regions of the chamber 5i) togravitate upwardly and be separated out, and not drawn in to the pump cylinders.

In Figs. 5 and 6 an embodiment of .the invention is illustrated generally similar to that previously described, but wherein the liquid flow within the dispensing line is itself used as a suction means for withdrawing the liquid and gases from the recovery chamber, thus eliminating pumping` devices. such as pumps 56 and 51 of the embodiment of the invention shown in Fig. 1. More speciically, aspirators such as generally indicated by the numerals 90 and s l, Fig. 5, are arranged in association with the exhaust pipes 54a and 55a leading from the recovery chamber 53. Moreover, in this instance the gas exhaust pipe 54a instead of discharging to atmosphere, as in the embodiment of the invention in Fig. l, exhausts into the pressure dispensing line.

The aspirators 9@ and 9| may be of similar structure, and of the structure illustrated in the copending application of Richard R. Trexler, Serial No. 251,121, filed January 16, 1939, an-d entitled Liquid dispensing apparatus, now issued as Patent 2,307,085 of January 5, 1943. One of them is illustrated in detail in Fig. 6. More specifically, a fitting 93 is arranged in the main dispensing line Ila, this iitting being provided with a valve 94 urged into closed position with a predetermined tension by means of a iiexure spring 95. A by-pass pipe 96 leads around the valve Silly this pipe being provided with a iitting Sl having a Venturi passage 98 and a connecting suction line 99 communicating with the pipe line or conduit 54a. The check valve 69a is also provided as indicated.

In operation the main liquid iiow takes place through the line Ila, so that no substantial impedance to fluid iiow is introduced, while at the same time a by-pass ow takes place through the pipe 96 and associated venturi 98. This venturi acts as an aspirator, producing a suction on the passage 99, drawing vapor through the conduit 54a, and thus supplanting the pump 56 in the embodiment of the invention previously described. The provision of the spring-pressed valve Sli insures that there will be a flow of liquid through the by-pass conduit 96 even during partial dispensing rates.

Both aspirators Si) and SI may be of similar structure, each being provided with a check valve and associated parts as indicated in Fig. 6.

In Fig. 7 an embodiment of the invention is illustrated similar to Fig. 1, but wherein the individual pumps 5t and 51 on the outlet side of the recovery chamber are replaced by a single pump |00 of a type capable of pumping either gas or liquid, or both, and arranged within the conduit 51o between the separation reservoir 5d and the recovery chamber. In this instance the pump |00 is operable to withdraw gas or liquid, or both, through the restricted orifice 52 and deliver the same into the recovery chamber. A check valve 50| is arranged in conduit 5H) to prevent reverse iiow. By this meansv the recovery charnber may be maintained under pressure so that gasmay be exhausted therefrom to atmosphere through the exhaust conduit 54h, and the recovered liquid returned to the supply line I3 through the conduit 55h. The pump il may be driven from the driving connections 5g' by means of a drive shaft or the like |02. Y'

It is obvious that Various changes may be made in the specific embodiments of the invention set forth for purposes of illustration without departing from the spirit thereof. The invention is accordingly not to be limited to the specific einbodiments shown, but only as indicated in the following claims.

The invention is hereby claimed as follows:

1. A liquid dispensing apparatus adapted to be connected to a source of liquid supply, said apparatus comprising a dispensing pump, inlet connections leading from the source or supply to the pump, a dispensing line connected to the outlet side of the pump through which liquid is propelled by the pump, a gas separation reservoir arranged in the inlet connections, a restricted orice leading from said reservoir through which gas and liquid pass, a recovery chamber connected to said passageway, said recovery chamber being maintained at a pressure below the lowest pressure in the inlet connections, and means or withdrawing gas and recovered liquid from the recovery chamber.

2. A liquid dispensing apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said last named means comprises aspirator mechanism powered by the iiow of the dispensed liquid.

3. A liquid dispensing apparatus adapted to be connected to a source of liquid supply, said apparatus comprising a dispensing pump, inlet con-` nections leading from the source of supply to the pump, a dispensing line connected to the outlet side of the pump through which liquid is propelled by the pump, a gas separation reservoir arranged in the inlet connections, a restricted passageway connected to the upper end of said reservoir through which gas and liquid pass, a recovery chamber connected to the passageway, and means connected to the recovery chamber for exhausting gas therefrom and for returning recovered liquid to the inlet connections on the advance side of said separation reservoir.

4. A liquid dispensing apparatus adapted to be connected to a source of liquid supply, said apparatus comprising a dispensing pump, inlet connections leading from the source of supply to the pump, a dispensing line connected to the outlet side of the pump through which liquid is propelled by the pump, a gas separation reservoir arranged in the inlet connections, a restricted passageway connected t0 said reservoir through which gas and liquid pass, a recovery chamber connected to the passageway, and aspirator means connected to the recovery chamber for exhausting gas therefrom into the dispensing line on the outlet side of the pump, and means for returning recovered liquid from the chamber into the inlet connections on the advance side of the separation reservoir.

5. A liquid dispensing apparatus adapted to be connected to a source of liquid supply, said apparatus comprising a dispensing pump, inlet connections leading from the source of supply te the pump, a dispensing line connected to the outlet side of the pump through which liquid is propelled by the pump, a gas separation reservoir arranged in the inlet connections, a restricted orice leading from said reservoir through which gas and liquid pass, a recovery chamber connected to said orifice, a pump arranged between said oriice and said recovery chamber for pumping the gas and liquid from the separation reservoir to the recovery chamber, and conduits for discharging gas and recovered liquid from the recovery chamber.

6. A liquid dispensing apparatus adapted to be connected to a source of liquid supply, said apparatus comprising a positive displacement dispensing pump, said pump being connected to register mechanism and comprising a measuring unit for the liquid propelled therethrough, inlet connections deiining a flow line leading from the source of supply to the inlet of the pump, a dispensing line connected to the outlet side of the pump through which liquid is propelled by the pump, a section of said inlet connections being vertically disposed whereby to provide an elongated vertically disposed head of liquid during the operation of the apparatus, gas eliminating means arranged adjacent the upper portion of said section, said gas eliminating means compriswithdrawing separated gas therefrom and said dispensing pump inlet being arranged at a level approximating the lower end of said section, said dispensing pump being of the type having multiple cylinders and pistons and wherein a plurality of inlet passages lead directly from the bottom of said section into the cylinders of the pump- JAMES BALLARD MOORE.

RICHARD R. TREXLER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,981,965 Morgan Nov. 27, 1934 2,033,930 Durdin Mar. 17, 1936 2,124,681 Jouch July 26, 1938 2,239,207 Trexler Apr. 22, 1941 2,188,849 Svenson June 30, 1940 1,477,733 Van Inwagen Dec. 18, 1923 1,837,937 Young Dec. 22, 1931 1,419,273 La Bour June 1'3, 1922 346,198 Fowler July 27, 1886 1,046,053 Bowser Dec. 3, 1912 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 445,041 British 1936

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3084832 *Sep 6, 1960Apr 9, 1963Gilbert & Barker Mfg CoLiquid dispensing unit with additive means for a second liquid
US6290760 *Apr 30, 1999Sep 18, 2001Tokheim CorporationAir separator system
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/26, 222/72
International ClassificationB67D7/76
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/763
European ClassificationB67D7/76B