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Publication numberUS2416538 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 25, 1947
Filing dateNov 4, 1944
Priority dateNov 4, 1944
Publication numberUS 2416538 A, US 2416538A, US-A-2416538, US2416538 A, US2416538A
InventorsNelson Arthur J
Original AssigneeNelson Arthur J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydroturbine pump
US 2416538 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 25, 1947. A. J. NELSON HYDRO TURBINE PUMP Filed Nov. 4, 1944 ZSheets-Sheet l m F v R v M v M5 n L r W O IN J u R H u 1947- A. J. NELSON 2,416,538

HYDRO TURBINE PUMP v Filed Nov. 4, 1944 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 8 6 5 FWHEHJLLI%\ FIG! E i Tlfikfiifl 7 49 ARTHUR MW" Y Patented Feb. 25, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE HYDROTURBINE PUMP Arthur J. Nelson, San Mateo, Calif. Application November 4, 1944, Serial No. 561,925

21 Claims.

1 This invention relates to the so-called hydro turbine pumps in which 'a multivaned rotor or impeller rotating in a closely fitting housing carries a ring of water. or other liquid around, and the housing space is larger than the impeller at one or more places in the diameter so as to cause the rotating ring of liquid to bodily surge radially back and forth piston-like between the impeller vanes and thus set up a pumping action in a regularly enlarging and contracting space created adjacent the hub of the impeller within the ring of liquid.

The invention has for its objects improvements in this type of pump whereby its efiectiveness is enhanced, and a construction which permits of readily changing the pump from a single stage unit to a double stage unit.

One feature is the special design of the vanes which form the liquid pockets between the vanes of the rotor.

Another feature is the diverting or cross-over vaned ring which controls the action o-fthe liquid in the pockets.

Another feature is the way the gas is controlled .to and from the rotor spaces.

Other features and advantages will appear in the following description and in the accompanying drawings:

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is an elevation of my improved hydroturbine pump connected up or piped to function as a two' stage pump.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of one of the two rotors or impellers of the pump supported on the pump shaft.

Fig.3 is a perspective view showing one vane only of the rotor connected to the rotor hub to show the compound form of the rotor vanes,

each of which is alike except that the two rotors generally used in one pump are respectively right and left insofar as the vanes are concerned and as will appear in Fig. 4.

' Fig. 4 is an enlarged longitudinal cross section of thepump casing and the two rotors taken along the line 44 of Fig. 5, and of Fi 6.

rounds one of the rotors.

Fig. 8 is an inside view of the unrolled ring of Fig. '7.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged sectional detail of a portion of the valve ring cage.

Fig. 10 shows the inner side of one of the heads of the pump, with part of the inner flange broken away.

Fig. 11 is a plan view of Fig. 1.

Generally described the pump comprises a main body casting taking the form of a cylindrical casing I formed with horizontally supportin legs 2, inlet 3, outlet 4, and other pumping passages. The cylinder I is closed on both ends by cast metal heads 5, 5 bolted against the ends of thecasing as by marginal bolts 6 passing through flanges I, 8, while carried outward on each of the heads is a suitable bearing l0 supported on suitable end brackets H and which bearings I0 rotatably support a central pump shaft; l2 which carries a. coupling flange [3 on one end to provide for driving the pump, while mounted centrally onthe shaft are two rotors the hubs of which are designated l4 and I4 and which are secured tothe shaft as by a key I5.

Hubs 14 are tubular and provided with outer end flanges l6, I6 and inner end flanges l1, ll which are in face contact, while embraced between these end flanges are more or less radially extending vanes l8, l8 between which the piston-like action of the water takes place and provided with outwardly extended portions l9, I9,

20, 20' respectively, to be further described later The interior of the cylindrical casing l is somewhat larger in diameter than the outer circumference of the rotor, and fitting within the an nular space thus formed between the rotors and the casing shell are two annular members 2|, 2|,

one for each rotor, and herein termed diverting rings the functions of which are toprovide peripheral spaces at opposite points within the diameter of the casing to permit the revolving ring of water carried around by the blades to surge outwardly at these points due to centrifugal force and. to direct this water from one portion (IQ) of the vanes over to the other portion (20) as the water is forced back again toward the rotor shaft, in quick repetition, to effect the liquid-piston pumping action, as will be more fully explained;

The heads 5 and 5' are relatively thick and are duplicates formed interiorly with certain inlet and outlet flow controlling passages to be described, and surrounding the shaft l2 in the heads are stufling boxes comprising rings of packing 22 mounted on a sleeve 23 fitting over the shaft 12 in inner abutting relation to the ing box. Both ends of the pump being alike Kin.

these details.

Returning now to the rotors, one of which (the right hand one of Fig. 4) is shown in perspective in Fig. 2, these are preferably castings and while the vanes l3 which project from the "tubular" hub 14 are preferably fiat and radial for the length of the hub, theouter portions l9 and 2B where the vanes extend to a larger diameter to fit within the diverting ring 2!, are ,for about .half their length curved fbackwardly (with respect to theclockwise-direct'ion of rotation of the rotor) as at 19 so as to exert a centrifugal pump action on the water, while the remaining or inner half .20 of each vane is curved forwardly, to function as a scoop to return the outwardly thrown water and force it back or down between the vanes toward the hub of the rotor. These two ,portionsof each vanedesign'ated A and B in Fig. ;3 are connectedas by a short web C in-this figure .for illustrative purposes, butwhich becomes a ringat the outer diameter of the blades where this transition from rearwardly curving to for wardly curving takes 'placeas all of the vanes are an integrally cast network and in .the completed assembly between the .rearwardly curved .outer edge A of .one vaneand its forwardly. curved edge B there would be the aligned rear'wardly,

and forwardly curved edges of two other vanes, all integrally joined .to the others. This will be understood by a glance at Fig. 6, where the edges of one vane A and B are indicated to correspond with the edges A and B of the detached vane shown .in perspective in Fig.3 to give a three dimensionalidea of the general formjof each vane. It should bekept in ,mind howeverthat the two rotorsarerights and lofts so that their scooping vane portions ,20 will beQadjacent atthe center of the pump to opposite sides of their contacting inner flanges [1, ll. Also to beLnotedis that the outer ends of portions l 9of the vanes are connected (preferably integrally.) by a ring or flange 3'l which is spaced slightly (for sealing liquidias at '32 from inner head flanges '33, {and between which inner head flanges the two diverting rings 2i and 2%! are embraced. 4

-Also formed within the heads 5 and 5 are hollow hubs 34 spaced longitudinally from flanges .33 andrwhich hubs arerecessed in conformity with the bore of flanges 3.3 to receive .a Valve ring cage 35, in embracing relation with the, outer edges of theextending flat portions lot the vanes, and which extending portions of the vanes form what may be termed the gas, end of the rotor, as it is here where the air or gasto be pumped enters and leaves the rotor. These valve rings (one for eachrotor) each have .fourlongitudinal block portions 36 positioned .at'9O de-.

grees apart and extending the length of the outeredges of vanes l8 and of a width to :each

straddle three of the vanes [-8 or rather twovane spaces, sothat there willbeleft runcovered two,

vane spaces between each valve block portion 4 I 36, all as best shown in Figs. 5 and '10 of the drawings. Also to be noted from these two figures is that covering block portions 36 are radially aligned with and form continuations of four radially disposed ribs 31 which separate the head space into four spaces or quadrants alternately designated inlet space and outlet space and which. will be seen from a consideration of Fig. 5 to be each open: to two of the vane rspaces between adjacent blocks 36 and which spaces between the vanes 18 form the gas or air inlets and .outlets respectively to the'pump rotor at opposite. quarters.

As both heads are alike, whenin place at op posite ends of the double rotor it of course brings the outlet spaces of one head in line (longitudinally of the pump) with the inlet spaces of the other and as the pump is provided centrally at opposite sides with one main inlet 3 and one main outlet 4 suitable cored passageways .3 and 4' formed in the bod casting'l extend longitudinally both ways toward opposite heads where each suitably connectslby appropriate ports .33, :39, 40, 4| in the heads with their inlet and outlet quadrants respectively. V V

As the function of the pump is to force a ring ofcontained water outwardly with the backw'ardly curved portion [9 of the vanes at opposite quarters in the" revolutions of the rotor to scooped portions 20 of the vanes to compress and eject the gas at the two opposite quarters when open to the outlet quadrants of the heads, this outward and inward surging of the contained water or water-ring as used in this type of turbine-pump is controlled in the present design, as previously stated, by the diverting or cross-over rings 21, .2! for the two rotors respectively of the pump. Each. of these rings provides at opposite points in the diameter a space defined by an outwardlyslanted wall 43 to permit the water to surge outwardly beyond the rotor, and following this (in direction of rotation) 'an inwardly slanted wall 44 to urge the revolving water inwardly again. However, as theoutwardly urged water leaves the rearwardly curved portions I!) of therotor vanes and the inwardly urged water is received by the forwardly scooped portions 29 of the'vanes, it is manifest that means should beprov-ided on the ring 2i to guide the water in thespa-ce beyond the rotor from the outwardly moving to the inwardly moving side or strata, and also to prevent the water from moving outwardly from portions IQ of the vanes or inwardly from portions 20 of the 'van'es except at the two diagrammatically opposite positions "where such movement is-desired to eifect the alternating suction and compression of the gas, air, or other fluid being pumped, within the proper quadrant of the pump rotor vane spaces as explained, Accordingly each diverting ring-is provided with circular inner wall portions '45 close to theyrotor arranged 'to close in the rotor at those two :opposite areas where the water should not be permitted to come out, and other circular inner wall portions 46 closing on the rotor .at those two opposite areas where the water should .not reenter the rotor. Besides this the rings are provided with standing ribs or cross-over guiding vanes 41, 48 which are angularly orspir'ally arranged t'o'guide the outwardly surging water over to the inwardly flow ing strata. These angularly disposedvanes co operate with standing inner marginal flange 49 and outer marginal flange 50. The construction and mode of operation will be easily understood by reference to' Figs. 4, 6, 7, and 8, the latter two figures being respectively the outer and inner sides of the ring shown flattened out-"and with the extreme ends of the development shown stepped to permit extension of the 'slanted'crossover guiding vanes to their extreme ends.

A feature of the water sealing of the moving parts is that the inner faces of the inwardly extending hollow hubs 34 of the heads are each provided with an annular water recess 5| which receives water from sealing water passage 28 and feeds the water to holes 52 in the side of valve ring (see Fig. 9) and which holes communicate with slots 53 in valve ring blocks 36 and through inwardly extending holes 54 directed toward the leading edge of these blocks (see Fig. 5), so that the film of water will be maintained against the inner arcuate surfaces of these blocks close to which the outer edges of the extended rotor vanes l8 pass, and thus seal off the inlet from the outlet quadrant spaces of the heads at these possible points of leakage. Any excess sealing water forced into the pump will simply find its way out with the compressed outlet gas or air and pass out of the outlet pipe 55 to a suitable water separator as'indicated at 5B in Fig. l and from where the settled water leaves from a pipe 51 from where it may be returned to the sealing water inlet 21 at opposite ends of the pump.

Of course the areas of the rotor spaces, diameter and length of rotor vanes, and size of surge spaces in the diverting rings 2| are so proportioned as to retain within the pump the required amount of water to provide thejdesired pumping spaces between the rotor vanes adjacent the hubs while always keeping the outer ends of the vanes covered with the water to maintain the waterpiston pumping action, as well understood with this type of pump.

When the pump is run as a single stage pump or compressor both rotors receive and discharge the gas or air being pumped from and to the main inlet 3 and main outlet 4 respectively. But

when using the two rotors in series as a two stage pump, the gasket (not shown) which is used across the joint 5! where heads '5, 5' join the body casting I is left blind at points to block off only the outlet passage 4' leading to head 5', and'similarly only the inlet passage 3' leading to head 5, and then an outlet pipe 55 is connected to a normally plugged opening 58 from the outlet space of the left side rotor and an inlet pipe 59 is connected to a normally plugged opening 60 to the inlet space of the right side rotor, pipes 55 and 59 preferably having a water separator 56 interposed, all as indicatedin'Figs. 1 and 11. Where the finally ejected gas or air being pumped is required to be free from water, a water separator will be used on the final outlet pipe.

While the drawings show a double rotor pump incorporating my improvements, it is evident that the pump may be made with one of the rotors only where half the capacity is suflicient or where no two stage hookup is desired. It'is also evident that more than two stages may be obtained by the use of an additional rotor if desired.

One of the advantages of forming the diverting vanes 41 and surge controlling walls 43, 44, etc, as a ring 2! is that it may be angularly adjusted what' I claim is:

1. Ina hydroturbine pump of the type de scribed, a rotor provided with a plurality of outwardly extending vanes spaced around a hub, said vanes each formed to provide an outer pumping portion adapted to urge the pumping liquid outward and "an adjacent outer turbine portion formed to facilitate the reentry of the liquid toward the hub of the rotor, the pumping portion and turbine portion of each blade merging into one continuous straight vane portion at said hub.

2. In a hydroturbine pump of the type described, a rotor provided :with a plurality of outwardly extending vanes spaced around a hub, said vanes each formed to provide an outer pumping portion adapted to urge the pumping liquid outward and an adjacent outer turbine portion formed to facilitate the reentry of the liquid toward the hub of the rotor, the pumping and turbine portions of each vane being integrally connected, and merging into one continuous straight vane portion at said hub.

3. In a hydroturbine pump of the type de-! scribed, a rotor provided with a pluralityof outwardly extending vanes spaced around a hub, said vanes each formed to provide an outer pump-,-

ing portion adapted to urge the pumping liquid outward and an adjacent outer turbine portion formedto facilitate thereentry of the liquid toward the hub of the rotor, the outer pumping and turbine portions of each vane being connected by a relatively short web extending transversely of the axis of rotation of the rotor, and the pumpingiand' turbine portions of each vane merging into one continuous straight vane portion at'saidhub. r I

4. In a hydroturbine pump of the type described, a rotor provided with a plurality of outwardly extending vanes spaced around a hub, said vanes each formed to-provide an outer pumping portion adapted to urge the pumping liquid outward and an adjacent outer turbine portion formed to facilitate the reentry of the liquid toward the hub of therotor and an axially extending portion, of materially smaller outside diameter. to form the gas receiving and discharging end of the rotor. I

5. In a hydroturbine'pump of the type described a rotor provided with angularly spaced vanes therearound, each vane comprising a longitudinally extending substantially flat minor portion projecting from the hub of the rotor, and a major portion of much greater diameter in turn formed for about half of its length with a rearwardly' curved portion and for about the other half of its length with a forwardly curved portion. I

6. In a hydroturbine pump of the type de-, scribed a rotor provided with spaced vanes are ranged to carryout the liquid piston effect common to such pumps, said vanes being stepped down to a reduced diameter at one end of the rotor to form a gas receiving and discharging end. i

7. In a hydroturbine pump of the type described a'rotor provided with spaced vanes arranged to carry out'the liquid'piston efiect com provided with separated gas inletand "outlet ports, and meanscooperating withat-he 'reduced'diameter vanes controlling admission of gas to some of the vane spaces from the head inlet port and the discharge of gas from :otheryane spaces to theihead outlet' -ports.

:8. In a 'hydroturbine pump ofythe type described a rotor provided with spaced vanes arranged to carry out the :liquidpiston effect com mon to such pumps, said vanes being stepped down to;a reduced diameter at one end of the rotor to form :a gas receiving and discharging end, a head on said -pump,.:formed with a recess receiving said reduceddiameter of the rotor vanes and provided with separated gas inlet and .outlet ports, and a valve cage embracing the-outer edges of the reduced diameter vanes closing off some of the vane spaces while maintaining other J spaces open to receive gas from the head inlet port and still others to the discharge of gas to the head outlet .ports. a

9. In a hydro turbine pump of the type described a rotor provided with spaced vanes arranged to carry outtthe liquid piston efiect common to such pumps, said vanes being stepped down'to a reduced' 'diameter atone end :of the rotor to form a gas receiving and discharging end, a head on said pump formed with a recess receivingsaid reduced diameter of the rotor vanes and provided with separated'gas inlet and "outlet ports, and a valve cage embracing the outer edges of the reduced diameter vanes closing ofi.

' some of the vane spaces while maintaining other spaces open to receive gas from the head inlet port :and still others to the discharge of gas to the head outlet "ports, and means for introducing a sealing liquid between the vanes and the valve cage.

'8 ward surging -;of the liquid, andliquid guiding vane means arranged to guide the outwardly urged'liquid angularly over to the inwardly :movingstrata.

$4. In the construction as set out in claim 13 said J-housingmeans comprising a circular shell spaced concentrically about the rotor, and ea' ring-like. cage member fitting within the space between the rotor and the shell and provided with cylindrical wall portions covering the'out-er endsof some 'of the vane spaces to'prevent outward .fiow of liquidland othersto prevent inward I floww of liquid, :while preserving otherva-ne spaces open for outward surging of the liquid beyond the ends of the-vanes, and still other vane spaces for inward movement of the liquid, said cylin-. drical wall portions of the ring being spaced about the :rotor and staggered axially :as required to control the outwardly and vinward-1y moving strata of liquid.

15. In the construction asset out in claim 13 said housing means comprising a circular shell spacedconcentrically about therotor, and a ring- -like cage member fitting within the space between the rotor and the shell and provided with cylindrical wall portions .covering the outer ends of some of the vane spaces to prevent outward flow of liquid and others t prevent inward flow of liquid, while preserving other Vane spaces open tor-outward surging of the liquid beyond the ends of the vanes, and still other vane spaces for inward movement of the liquid, said cylindrical wall portions of the ring being spaced about the 7 beyond the rotor.

10. In the construction as set out in claim 8 l' a 'fiange closing the outer ends of the diameter vane spaces.

:11. In the construction as set out in claim *8 a flange closing the outer ends of the "reduced reduced 1 diameter vane spaces-and means for introducing a sealing liquid between the running joints of said flange and also said vanes.

12. In a "-hydroturbine 'pump of the type described a rotor provided with spaced'van'es arranged to carry out the liquid pistonefiect common torsuch pumps, said vanes being formed for part of their longitudinal length in a manner ranged guide means arranged around-the rotor guiding the outwardly urged strata of liquid 1 angularly over to the inwardly moving strata.

13. 'In a hydroturbine pump of the type ideliquid for inward movement, housing means around the rotor formed :to isubstantially confine the rotor over part :of its :diameter :while providingl'space .ioutwarrl of the ."rotor to permit outtending "to throw "the pumping liquid outward,

5 and for an'adjacent portion of'their length in 'a manner tending to receive the outwardly surged liquid forinward movement, and angularly ar- -16. In the construction as set out in claim 13 said housing means comprising a circular shell spaced concentrically about the rotor, and a ringiike cage member fitting within the space between the rotor and the shell and provided with cylinrical wall portions covering the outer ends of some of the vane spaces to prevent outward flow of liquid, and others to prevent inward flow of liquid, while preserving other vane spaces open for outward surging of the liquid beyond the ends of the vanes, and still other vane spaces for inward'movement ofthe'liquid, said cylindrical wall portions ofthe ring being spaced about the rotor and staggered axially as required to control the outwardly and inwardly moving strata of liquid, said cylindrical wall portions slanting outwardly at their ends outward of the rotor at spaced regions to'provide the liquid surging space'beyond ence oi'the rotors, a head-secured to each end of the casing member formed to embrace the extension of the rotor vanes adjacent the head, said heads being each provided on its inner side with spaced inlet and outlet gas ports, means isolating the gas inlet spaces of the vanes from the-outlet spaces and guide the gas respectively to and from the inlet and outlet gas ports of the head adjacent vanes.

18. In a hydroturbine pump of the type described a casing member with two liquid-piston type vaned rotors therein in endwise adjacent relation, each of said rotors having an extension of its vanes at the outer end providing gas inlet and outlet spaces between the vanes respectively at spaced points in the circumference of the rotors, ahead secured to each end of the casing member formed to embrace the extension of the rotor vanes adjacent the head, said heads being each provided on its inner side with spaced inlet and outlet gas ports, means isolating the gas inlet spaces of the vanes fromthe outlet spaces and guide the gas respectively to and from the inlet and outlet gas ports of the head adjacent vanes and gas passages carried by the casing members connecting respectively the inlet and outlet ports of the heads.

19. In a hydroturbine pump of the type described a casing member with two liquid-piston type vaned rotors therein in endwise adjacent relation, each of said rotors having an extension of its vanes at the outer end providing gas inlet and outlet spaces between the vanes respectively at spaced points in the circumference of the rators, a head secured to each end of the casing member formed to embrace the extension of the rotor vanes adjacent the head, said heads being each provided on its inner side with spaced inlet and outlet gas ports, means isolating the gas inlet spaces of the vanes from the outlet spaces and guide the gas respectively to and from the inlet and outlet gas ports of the head adjacent vanes and gas passages carried by the casing members connecting respectively the inlet and outlet ports of the heads and said gas passages carried by 10 c the casing each provided with an opening fitted with means for attaching a pipe.

20. In a pump structure as set out in claim 18 means controlling the pumping liquid to provide two suction and two compression surges at each revolution of the rotor, the suction and, compression surges taking place alternately at of arc, and said heads each being formed on its inner side with walls providing four quadrant spaces which are alternately connected with the inlet and outlet gas ports of the head.

21. In a hydroturbine pump of the type described a casing member with two liquid-piston type vaned rotors therein in endwise adjacent relation, each of said rotors having an extension of its vanes at the outer end providing gas inlet and outlet spaces between the vanes respectively at spaced points in the circumference of the r0- tcrs, a head secured to each end of the casing member formed to embrace the, extension of the rotor vanes adjacent the head, said heads being each provided on its inner side with spaced inlet and outlet gas ports, means isolating the gas inlet spaces of the vanes from the outlet spaces and guide the gas respectively to and from the inlet and outlet gas ports of the head adjacent vanes, and gas passage means adapted for connecting said rotors in series as a two-stage pump.

ARTHUR J. NELSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file ofthis patent: I

UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1766751 *Sep 4, 1924Jun 24, 1930Jennings Irving CRotary pump
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3031974 *Mar 8, 1955May 1, 1962Edwards Miles LowellSelf-priming gas-expelling pump
US4132504 *Apr 7, 1976Jan 2, 1979General Signal CorporationLiquid ring pump
US4334830 *Mar 24, 1980Jun 15, 1982The Nash Engineering CompanyTwo-stage liquid ring pump with improved intrastage and interstage sealing means
US4422832 *Oct 23, 1981Dec 27, 1983The Nash Engineering CompanyLiquid ring pump with vanes in liquid ring
US4747752 *Apr 20, 1987May 31, 1988Somarakis, Inc.Sealing and dynamic operation of a liquid ring pump
US7563075May 4, 2004Jul 21, 2009Sterling Fluid Systems (Germany) GmbhLiquid ring pump
CN100482946CMay 4, 2004Apr 29, 2009施特灵流体系统(德国)股份公司Liquid ring pump
WO2004102003A1 *May 4, 2004Nov 25, 2004Heetsch SilkeLiquid ring pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/68, 417/93
International ClassificationF04C19/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04C19/002
European ClassificationF04C19/00D