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Publication numberUS2416910 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 4, 1947
Filing dateAug 11, 1944
Priority dateAug 11, 1944
Publication numberUS 2416910 A, US 2416910A, US-A-2416910, US2416910 A, US2416910A
InventorsCrosby George A, Ericsson Arvid I
Original AssigneeSignode Steel Strapping Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package-binding tool support
US 2416910 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 4, 1947. CROSBY ET L 2,416,910

PACKAGE-BINDING V TOOL SUPPORT Filed Aug. 11, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet l lllll March 4, 1947. G CROSBY ET AL 2,416,910

VPACKAGE-BINDING TOOL SUPPORT Filed Aug. 11, 1944' 5 Sheets-Sheet-Z v 46645 aa gg 3 March 4, 1947.

lpllllllllllllln lull/ G. A. CROSBY ET AL PACKAGE-BINDING TOOL SUPPORT Filed Aug. 11; 1944 s Sheets-Sheet s I p plukz zzrzbssvzu March 4, 1947. S Y ET A 2,416,910

PACKAGE-BINDING TOOL SUPPORT Filed Aug. 11, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 mum \ b A w March 4, 1947. CROSBY ET AL $416,910

' PACKAGE-BINDING TOOL SUPPORT I Filed Aug. 11, 1944 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 (ZI/nd 15/668818? 2 6 E Patented Ma. 4, 1947 PA CKAGE-BINDING TOOL SUPPORT George A. Crosby, Park Ridge, and Arvid I. Ericsson, Chicago,Ill., assignors to Signode Steel Strapping Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Delaware Application August 11, 1944, Serial No. 549,002

8 Claims. (c1. 24s280) Our invention relates to package-binding tool supports. That is to a support for carrying a tool used in the application of tensioned reinforcing or binding strap or wire about packages. Its purpose is normally to hold the package-binding tool in proximityto-preferably above-the space on a shelf or bench where package-binding is to be done, but to permit the operator transiently to shift the tool to the surface of the package for binding. By the use of such supports, tools are less apt to be dropped and damaged and operators are able to bind packages in quantity faster and with less fatigue.

The principal object of the invention is to provide a tool support that is simple, light, inexpensive, eifective for the intended purpose, readily adjustable for varying conditions, and easy to manipulate.

Other objects and advantages will hereinafter appear.

The preferred embodiment of our invention is shown in the accompanying drawings, wherein Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a tool support showing how its base or foot maybe adjusted for attachment to the floor or to the side of a work bench or other vertical wall; the ful lines show the support in normal or inactive position with the tool away from the package, and the dotdash lines indicate it in a condition assumed with the tool in binding position resting on a package;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged side elevation of the tool support, showing in full lines an intermediate position and in dot-dash lines the active position. In both positions a binding tool is indicated by dotted lines;

Fig; 3 is an enlarged top plan partly in section;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged section on the line 4-4 of'Fig. 2;

:Fig. 5 is a section on the line 5 5 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is a section similar to Fig. 5 with the supporting arm swung ninety degrees;

Fig. '7 is a partial top plan showing the supporting arm swung ninety degrees from the position of Fig. 3;

Fig. 8 is a section on the line-8-8 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged section on the line 99 of Fig. 3; a

Fig. 10 is a section'on the line l0l0 of Fig. 9;

;Fig. 11 is a section on the line ll--ll of Fig. 9;

Fig. 12 is an enlarged elevation of the arm' camming member and adjacent portions of the sup port pedestal;

Fig. 13 is an enlarged elevation and partial section of the attaching foot or bracket support secured to the floor;

of the.

Fig. 14 is a section on the line l4-l4 of Fig. and

Fig. 15 is a view similar to" Fig. 14 but with' the foot or bracket secured to a side wallor bench. a

In general, the tool support includes a tubular telescopic pedestal A, which for convenience may be attachedbya foot or bracket B either to the floor adjacent a work bench or shelf C or to the wall or side of the work bench, alaterally projecting arm D, which is pivotally carried by the upper end of the pedestal and extends laterally therefrom so that its free end may be brought over the space on the bench or shelf where a. package rests in binding position, and a tool car rierE, which is pivoted to the outer or free end of the arm D and adapted to be attached in some appropriate manner to the bindingv tool to be supported. The arm and tool carrier are spring biased so as normally to hold the tool far enough from the package space to enable a package to be placed in binding position without interference. By slight effort, however, the operator may bring the tool to binding position flat against a surface of the package and, after completion of the binding operation, easily return the tool to its II, application Serial No. 514,343, filed December The pedestal A is composed of two telescopic tubular sections 5 and 6. Preferably the sections are formed from lengths of steel pipe of slightly different diameters. Outer section 5 is pivotally attachednear its lower end to the foot or base bracket B; This foot B is formed with two upstanding spaced flanges 9 and Ill between which the lower end of outer pedestal section 5 lies. The pivotal connection between the foot and the outer tubularsection is effected by means of a pivot bolt II and preferably, in order to provide a longer operating surface and thereby insure greater lateral rigidity, a section of tubing [2.

passing through aligned holes in and welded to outer section 5, forms an elongated bearing for the bolt I l. Pivot bolt ll passes through aligned holes inthe two footfianges 9 and Ill and axially through the bearing provided by the sleeve, l2. This construction is shown most clearly in Fig. 13.

Foot B is formed with a pair ofparallel webs l5 and I5 which lie between flanges 9 and I0 and are separated'far enough apart forxthe lower end.

of outer pedestal section 5 to lie loosely therebetween, as shown most clearly in Fig. 14. Webs l5 and I6 have threaded holes therethrough for abutment screws l1 and I8, respectively. These two abutment screws l1 and I8 serve as adjustable stops for engaging either the lower end'of' section 5 or a stop lug 25 rigidly projecting from. the lower section 5 to limit the forward and backward swing of the support pedestal about pivot bolt ll, depending upon whether foot B is attached to the floor or a vertical wall. Adjust ment may be retained by lock nuts 21 and 28. Foot flanges 9 and [3 have lateral-1y directed attaching flanges 29 and 30, respectively,. which are provided with holes for screws 31 and 32:, -respectively, for anchoring the foot to the floor or to a vertical wall as desired. When, as shown in the full lines of Fig. 1 and in Figs. 2, 3, 4, 7, l3 and 14 the pedestal foot is anchored to the floor, the cap abutment screws l1 and I8 are located on opposite sides and. in the path of movement of lower pedestal section 5, and thereby the forward and backward swing of pedestal A about pivot bolt H- is limited by the adjustment of screws l1 and I8. When the base is anchored to a vertical surface, the adjustment cap screws are located on opposite sides of stop lug .25 as shown in Fig. 15 and the engagement of that stop lug against screws l1 and I8 limits the forward and rearward swing of the pedestal.

I The upper end of outer pedestal section 5 has a rectangular collar 35 welded or otherwise rigidly fastened thereto. The forward half of the top surface of'collar 35 lies horizontally, whereas the rear half thereof is inclined to provide the beveled surface 36 for a purpose to be presently explained. Collar 35 has an upstanding flange 3!v along its rear edge which serves to limit the permissible relative rotation between the telescopic pedestal sections 5 and 6 to the desired amount; as shown, to one hundred eighty degrees, or ninety degrees each side of the central operative position.

The internal. upper telescopic section 6 of the pedestal is provided with an adjustable collar 38 which has a hole therethrough only slightly larger than the external diameter of section 6 so that the section may be slid axially therethrough. However, the collar is providedwith a radial slot 35 and aligned holes 40 and 4I--the former lieing threaded and the latter unthreaded-at right angles thereto for the reception of a clamp screw 42.

39 may bedrawn together so as to cause the collar tightly to grip pedestal section B and there by become immovabl with respect thereto; or the collar may be forced orpermltted to expand to enable the pedestal section 6 to be moved'axially therethrough in either direction. Normally collar 33 of section 6 rests upon collar 35 at the top of section 5 so that by adjusting the position of collar 38 upon section 6, it is possible to vary the extent to which the pedestal is extended or shortened so as to adapt the vertical height of the arm of the tool holder for different conditions-such as difierent heights of the binding benchor of the packages being bound.

Clamp screw 42 carries a ring or washer 43 which lies in the slot 39 of collar 38 and projects intoa' longitudinalslot 44 in the upper smaller tubular section 6, thereby preventing relative rotation between the upper tubular section .and the height adjusting collar v38 so that the *two always By means of this clamp screw 42 V the sections of collar 38 on opposite sides of slot collar is clamped to the upper tubular section. In general the adjustable collar 38 is semi-circular so that it may be rotated relative to fixed collar 35 until one or the other of its flat sidesstrikes flange 31 whereupon further relative rotation is prevented. Thus as most clearly indicated in Figs. 5 and 6, the upper tubular pedestal section 6 and the height adjusting collar 38 can be rotated relative to the lower larger pedestal section 5 for 180. The lower surface of the rear. half of collar 38 is beveled, as at 45, corresponding to the beveled surface 33 of collar35. These confronting beveled surfaces cause the telescopic section 5 and the tool supporting arm carried thereby normally to tend to lie with the arm over a package in binding position. v

The lateral tool supporting arm D at the top end of the telescopic pedestal includes an angular bracket consisting of a pair of parallel side plates 55 and 56, which are rigidly attached in spaced relation to the top end of. the smaller upper pedestal section 5. The preferred attachment is shown most clearly in Figs. 2 and 9-. It is formedby providing thetop open end of section '6 with four longitudinally extending slots cut or milled therein in aligned pairsy and into each pair one of the side plates 55 or 55 is rather snugly fitted and then welded intoposition. 7

Between the side plates 55 and 56. lie parallel levers 5'! and 58 which are pivoted thereto by a common pivot pin 59. This pin is retained in place by suitable means, such as cotter pins 50. The outer ends of'levers 51 and 58 carry the tool carrier E. This carrier includes a flat stem 65 lying between and pivotally attached to the outer ends of the levers 51 and 58 by a bolt 63 which is retained in place by a suitable nut 61. The form and character of this tool carrier will depend upon the construction of the tool to be supported. In the construction shown the stem- 65 of the carrier is bent to form a laterally extending flange 69 which is bifurcated to receive a tool attachment plate 1.0, Plate lfl is pivotally secured to flange 69 by means of a knurled headed pivot stud H which'is biased into forward or anchoring position by a spring 12. Any appropriate means may be employed for securing the package binding tool to the attachmentplate 10;

Ward to retaining position.

A' bar or linkl5 lies between-the levers '5 7 and 58 and is pivotally attached-at its rear end to and between the fixed bracket plates 255, and 56 by a pivot'pin 3'6. The levers 51 and 58 have notches l8 and 79, respectively, foraccommodating the protruding ends of :pin 16. The forward end of bar or link l-5 is extended by a pair of link plates .85 and '86, rigidly attached to 'oppo site sides of the outer end thereof by rivets .81, Thus the link extension :plates' and-86 lie in the planes of the arm levers '51 and58, respectively, being accommodated by notches '88 and V 8.9. respectively, in the'zupper edges of those lepin carried by the outer ends of link exten sion lates s5 and 86. -A compression spring .97.

And link extension plates 85 and 85..are Y spaced apart so thatthe stem 35 of the tool carrier may lie between the outer ends thereof.-

1 c The tool carrier stem 65 is provided 'WithQanJ I elongated slot 95 through-which extends a link lies -i-in" this slot, one end against an end of the slot and the other end against pin 96. It is re-' tai'ned against lateral displacement by the two link plates 85 and 86. This spring normally biases the stem of the tool carrier so that link pin 96 lies against the forward end of the slot 95 in the tool carrier stem 55, In operation, however, the tool'carri'er may be tilted or rocked against the force-of this spring. Thus the arm D provides a parallel motion support for the tool carrier stem whereby the tool carrier may be swung vertically about pivots 59 and I6 and yet the stem and the tool are not tilted. However, if, as is the case with some types of binding tools, the tool tends to slide slightly along the package during the binder tensioning operation, the pin and slot connection between the tool carrier stem andthe link extensions 85 and B6 enables the tool so to move without causing it to tilt relative to the surface of the packagethe biasing spring 9! returning the parts to normal as soon as the tool .is released.

In order to facilitate the raising and lowering of the tool carried by the outer end of arm D, the latter is biased or, in effect, counterweighted, by a spring I05 which is housed within pedestal A. The lower end of spring I05 is hooked through the eye I06 of a tension adjusting rod III]. This rod passes through a hole in a guide and abutment cap I08 which fits over the lower end of inner tubular section 6 of the pedestal, as shown most clearly in Figs, 2 and 4. The lower end of the rod I! is threaded for an adjusting nut I09, which abuts against cap I08 and by its position along rod I01 may vary the effective tension of spring I05. The upper end of spring I is hooked; into the lower end of a link rod H0 and the upper end of link rod H0 is hooked about a grooved barrel III of a pin I I2. The opposite ends of pin I I2 rest in notches I I3 and I id in arm levers 51 and 58, respectively. Preferably the relation between the arm pivot 59 and the spring pin I I2 is such that in the movements of the carrier arm from normal to tool operative position, and vice versa, the efiective moment arm of pin II2 varies from a maximum when the spring force is at a minimum to a minimum when the spring force is at a maximum. Thus the force of spring I05 is applied to the tool carrier arm on the side of its pivots 59 and I6 opposite to that of the tool carrier so that, depending upon the adjusted tension of that spring, the tool carrier and the tool carried thereby are urged or biased upwardly away from the space occupied by a package being bound. As desired, this tension may be such as actually to lift the tool from the package unless forcefully held down by the operator or, as may be the better practice to avoid fatiguing the operator, the tension may be only such as substantially to. counterbalance the tool so that by very slight effort the operator may lower the tool down into binding position on top of the package and raise the tool after the binding operation to clear the space on the bench for the removal of the bound package and the positioning of the next package to be bound.

Briefly to summarize, the operation and advantages of our tool support are as follows: The foot of the support may be attached either to the floor at the rear of the binding bench or to a vertical wall, such as the back of the bench, as indicated in Figs. 1, 13 and 14 and 15. In the specific embodiment shown in the drawings, the normal or package receiving position of the 6 tool support is with the upper end of the tubular telescopic pedestal pushed back and the carrier arm in mid position, as indicated by the full lines of Figs. 1 and 3. Also the outer end of the tool carrier arm is elevated, either by the force of spring I05 or by the effort of the operator, depending upon the tension adjustment of spring I05. The work space or position occupied by a package during a binding operation is now cleared so that the operator can locate a package to be bound Without interference from the tool or the support.

After the package has been placed in binding position on the surface of the bench, the operator by one composite movement-or by separate movements if desired-can pull the tool forwardthe tubular pedestal hinging about its anchorage foot to the position indicated by the dotdash lines of Fig. 1-swing it horizontally from a location at one side of binding position to directly over binding positionthe turning of the inner telescopic pedestal section within the outer. telescopic section permitting this movement.-

lower the tool upon the package to be boundbeoause of the parallel motion hinging of the carrier arm about pivots 59 and Hi-and accommodate the tool to any slight unevenness or inclination of the top surface of the package-permitted by the in and slot connection between the carrier stem and the link extensions and 85 of the carrier arm.

7 Upon completion of the binding operation, the operator, by mere reversal of the movements preceding the bindin operation, can move the binding tool out of the way for the removal of the bound package and the placement of the nex package to be bound.

Having thus illustrated and explained the nature and one embodiment of our invention, what we claim and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is as follows:

1. A package-binding tool support comprising a pedestal, a bracket secured to the pedestal,- an

' end for extending over the package and an inner;

end extending from the pivot in a direction opposite the outer end, a spring anchored at one end to the pedestal and having the'other end anchored at the inner end of the arm to bias the outer end of the arm upwardly away from the package, a tool carrier pivotally connected to the outer end of the arm, a link pivotally connected to the tool carrier and to the rear portion of the arm, the connection with the tool carrier being of the pin and slot variety, and a spring biasing the pin toward one end of the slot.

2. A package-binding tool support comprising a tubular pedestal, a bracket secured to the upper end of the pedestal, an arm pivoted to the bracket and projecting laterally from the pedestal, said arm having an outer end for extending over the package and an inner end extending over the bore of the tubular pedestal, a spring within the bore of the pedestal having one end anchored to the pedestal and the other end anchored at the inner end of the arm to bias the outer end of the arm upwardly away from the package, a tool carrier pivotally connected to the outer end of the arm, a link pivotally connected to the tool carrier and to the rear portion of the arm, the connection with the tool carrier being of the pin and slot variety, and a spring biasing the pin toward one end of the slot.

3. A package-binding tool support comprising a pedestal, means for anchoring the pedestal either to the floor or a vertical Wall, an angular bracket at the top of the pedestal, a tool-supporting arm pivotally connected to and projecting laterally from the pedestal, said arm including a lever pivoted to the bracket and a link also pivotally connected to and projecting laterally from the pedestal in parallelsm with the lever,

a tool carrier pivotally connected both to the lever and the link of the tool-carrying arm, and a spring anchored at one end to the pedestal and at the other end to the lever for biasing the outer ends of the lever and link upwardly. I

r 4. A package-binding tool support comprising a telescopic pedestal having lower and upper sections, means for adjusting the telescopic relation of the two pedestal-sections, means for anchoring the bottom end of the lower section-relative to the package-binding location, a bracket secured to the top end of the upper section, a tool-supporting arm pivotally connected to the bracket and projecting laterally from the pedestal, said arm including a lever pivotally connected to and projecting laterally from the bracket and a link .also pivoted to and projecting laterally from the bracket in parallelism with the lever, a tool carrier pivotally connected to the lever of the toolcarrying arm and a pin and slot connection between the tool carrier and the link of the toolcarrying arm. 7

5. A package-binding tool support comprising a pedestal, means for anchoring the pedestal upright adjacent a package-binding bench, a bracket at the upper end of the pedestal, a tool-sup and a spring for biasing the tool-carrier pin to-' ward one end of the slot.

6. A package-binding tool support comprising ably related sections, an anchoring foot pivotally attached to one section, a bracket attached to the other section, a tool-supporting arm. pivotally carried by the bracket and extending laterally therefrom, said arm including a lever pivotally attached to the bracket and a link also pivotally attached to the bracket and lying parallel'to the lever, a tool-carrier pivotally attached to the free ends of the lever and link, and a spring for biasing the free ends of the lever and link upwardly.

7. A package-binding tool support comprisinga foot forattachment to a floor or side wall; a telescopic pedestal pivotally carried by the foot;- said pedestal including a lower tubular section and an upper tubular section longitudinally and axially movable with respect to each other; ad-

justing means for varying the longitudinal relation between the pedestal sections; and a toolsupporting arm pivotally carried by the upper pedestal section, saidvarm including a lever, a link and a tool-carrier related to give parallel motion to the tool-carrier.

8. A package-binding tool support comprising a foot for attachment to a floor or side wall; a telescopic pedestal pivotally. carried by the foot;

said pedestal including a lower tubular section and an upper tubular section longitudinally and axially movable with respect to each other; ad-

justing means for varying the longitudinal rela- .tion between the pedestal sections; a tool-supporting arm pivotally carried by the upper pedestal section, said arm including a lever, a link and a tool-carrier related to give parallel motion a pedestal formed of two telescopic and rotatto the tool-carrier; and a spring for biasing-the outer ends of the lever and link upwardly. ,7

GEORGE A. CROSBY. v ARVID I. ERICSS ON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of recordin the file of this patent: V

FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date British Mar. 8, 1938 Number

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Referenced by
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US2459280 *Nov 6, 1946Jan 18, 1949Superior Funeral Supply CorpFolding support
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US2557608 *Aug 19, 1948Jun 19, 1951Keystone View CompanyStand
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US2855041 *Nov 20, 1953Oct 7, 1958American Hospital Supply CorpCurtain arm structure
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Classifications
U.S. Classification248/585, 248/578
International ClassificationB65B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65B13/186
European ClassificationB65B13/18T2