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Publication numberUS2418392 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1947
Filing dateJul 28, 1943
Priority dateJul 28, 1943
Publication numberUS 2418392 A, US 2418392A, US-A-2418392, US2418392 A, US2418392A
InventorsBender Sydney E
Original AssigneeAmerican Cyanamid Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lifesaving dye marker and the method of making same
US 2418392 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1947- s. E; BENDER 9 LIFE SAVING DYE MARKER AND THE METHOD. OF MAKING SAME Filed July 28, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet l gum April 1, 1947. s. E. BENDER LIFE SAVING DYE MARKER AND THE METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed July 28,1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. Jywv: y A? fli/voz-w.

A TTORNEY.

Patented Apr. 1, 1947 LIFESAVING DYE MARKER AND THE METHOD OF MAKING SAME Sydney E. Bender, Brooklyn, N. Y., assfgnor to American Cyanamid Company,

New York,

N. Y., a corporation of Maine Application July 28, 1943, Serial No. 496,682 6 Claims. (Cl. 206-0.5)

This invention relates to life saving devices generally, and particularly to what may be termed life markers, intended to indicate a place where a person in distress is located in water scanned from the air.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide an inexpensive, simple, easily operatable, and eiiective life marker which is so constructed that it may be easily carried by a person and may be unobtrusively suspended from an existing garment or a part thereof, and which may be readily handled when the person is in distress.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a life marker consisting of av completely sealed container which is positively water-proof and which will resist the influence of normal cold and heat, and which houses a porous bag filled with a water-soluble substance and which is releasable from the container, but remains connected thereto while released, and which substance will spread over a large area of water and discolor the same in daylight and render it fluorescent in darkness.

Another object of the present invention is the method of producing life markers of the type indicated.

The foregoing and still further objects and other important advantages of the present invention will become fully understood from the ensuing description, in connection with the accompanying drawings and in which:

Figure 1 indicates a fragmental illustration of a person wearing my life marker;

Figure 2 is a plan view of a blanked-out body of my life marker container:

Figur 3 is a similar view of the body to which a removable closure is secured;

Figure 4 indicates a partially completed container of my life marker, with a portion thereof removed;

Figure 5 is a partial rear view of the lower end of the device shown in Figure 4;

Figure 6 is a section taken on line 6-6 of Figure 4;

Figure 7 is a section taken on line of Figure 4;

Figure 8 is a section taken on line 88 of Figure 5;

Figure 9 is a similar section to that shown in Figure 8 with the bottom edg turned upon itself and held in that position;

Figure 10 is an enlarged typical cross section through the material of which thecontainer is fabrica ed:

Figure 11 illustrates the completed article in one of its presently preferred forms;

Figure 12 is a longitudinal cross section taken on lines I2-l2 of Figure 11;

Figure 13 is a fragmental illustration of a person wearing a modified form of my device;

Figure 14 is a blanked-out portion of this mod ified form;

Figure 15 is another blanked-out portion of the modified form;

Figure 16 is a plan view of a completed article ready for attachment; and

Figure 17 is a side elevation thereof, partially in cross section.

From the above short description of the different figures, it is evident that my life marker is produced in certain definite stages of manufacture, especially concerning the container structure of the device.

Referring now specifically to Figures 1 to 12, inclusive, the completed device, indicated at III in Figures 1, 11, and 12, is fabricated from a specially treated material, as shown in detail cross section in Figure 10. The material consists of a closely woven flexible textile, preferably of plastic, waterproof fibre, such as "nylon," which is impregnated by, and covered at both of its faces with a waterproof composition of highly pliable plastic material, such as a composition of polyvinyl chloride and acetone, whereby the pores of the fabric are positively sealed, thus rendering the finished article water resistant.

The impregnating material possesses the property of becoming temporarily liquid under the combined application of both pressure and heat, whereby two or more superimposed layers of the finished fabric maybe effectively joined with one another through the plastic impregnating substance. Also, the fabric base is sufllciently flexible to b readily shaped. folded, or handled otherwise, so that the finished article will readily conform with the contour of its support and thus prove unobtrusive to the person wearing it.

In Figure 10 the material of the container is shown to consist of the above described flexible textile base H and outer layers I! made of plastic, pliable, waterproof, cold and heat resisting material, which is capable of being joined with a similarly treated material by the combined application of heat and pressure. 7

The first step in the process of manufacturing the container is indicated in Figure 2,. wherein an oblong portion of the fabric is blanked-out into the form indicated at l3. The blanking-out operation includes the formation of a strip ll which anasea extends from the side of the blank and continues in downward direction, the downwardly directed portion of the strip being spaced at l from the body of the blank. The blanking operation also includes the provision of an aperture l5 near the bottom edge of the blank.

The second step in the manufacture of my device consists of providing a removable closure for aperture l6. Such closure is indicated at I1 and consists of an elongated strip which is placed over the marginal portions surrounding the edges of aperture l6 and which is attached to the blank by subjecting the latter and the strip to pressure and heat over an elongated area extending from the edge portion l8 of the strip to approximately line l9 at the right end of aperture iii. In this manner the free end of strip I1 is caused to extend a substantial length beyond the finished container, (see Figures 4 and 6) and is intended to serve as a handle for the removal of the strip when aperture I6 is to be cleared.

The third operation in the manufacture of the container is indicated in Figures 4 and 6. Blank |3 is folded upon itself so that its end portions become superimposed upon one another, with their edges being substantially parallel. In that position, the overlapping margins 20 are joined with one another by heat and pressure, but so that extension l4 remains free. In this manner, a substantially flat, tubular structure is produced from which freely extends sidewise, the end of strip H.

The next step in the process consists of joining the bottom and the lower side edges of the tubular formation. in the manner indicated at 2| and 22, respectively. This joining of the edges is accomplished by the application of heat and pressure in thesarne manner as explained previously. The bottom edge and the lower portions of the side edges of the tubular formation are so united internally as to prevent any object being removed from the container through aperture l6 from catching at the edges of the latter.

The structure of the lower portion of the container, prior to joining its bottom and side edges, is indicated in Figure 7. When the bottom edge and the lower side portions of the container are united, the arrangement of the lower container portion will be that shown in Figure 8.

The next step consists of turning the united lower edge portion of the container upon itself in the direction of arrow 1" so that the extreme end of the container will be placed against the rear side thereof. in which position the turned-up edge is aga n united with the container body in the manner indicated in Figure 9,

The container, virtually forming a flexible bag, is now ready to receive the marking means, in dicated at 23 in Figures 11 and 12. These marking means constitute a orou eceptacle 24, similar to a tea bag, which is filled with a watersoluble co oring ubstance which will float and at the same time will discolor the water while it spreads over the surface. In darkness this coloring matter will floresce so as to render the area covered by it visible at night.

To one edge of bag 24 there is attached a tape 25, which is preferably wound about it, and its free end is secured to extension M at 26 by stitching or otherwise. as indicated in Figure 12. When bag 24 is now placed in the container, the open end of the latter s sealed by subject ng it to heat and pressure. The thus sealed portion of the container is then wound upon itself. as shown in 21, and provides a passage for a carrying strap 28, which is preferably riveted at 29 to the sealed container top. By means of strap 28, the completed device i then secured to a portion of a garment worn by the person to be equipped with the device.

In the event of distress, bag 24 is removed from the attached container by simply ripping off strip I! from over aperture l6 and passing the bag of the coloring matter through the aperture to without, while tape 25, attached to extension l4 prevents the disengagement of the bag of coloring from the container. As a person float in the water, the coloring matter spreads over the surface of the water, so that an aerial observer will easily detect the large surface discolored by the contents of the bag.

Modification A modified form of the device is illustrated in Figures 13 to 17. The completed article, attached to the wearer, is shown in Figure 13 at 30, and in its enlarged form in Figures 16 and 17. This modified construction is somewhat simpler than the one .described previously. It consists of two substantially similar, rectangular blanks 3| and 32, shown respectively in Figures 14 and 15 in detail. Blank 3| is somewhat longer than blank 32, and is equipped with an attaching member 33, associated with its central position at 34. Blank 32 is provided with a side extension 35 at one of its corners.

Before blanks 3| and 32 are joined, a bag of coloring matter 23', shown in Figure 16, is secured with its attaching tape to attaching members 33 of blank 3|, whereupon blank 32 is placed over blank 3|. Now the peripheral edges 35 and 36, as well as most of the edge portions 31 and 38 of smaller blank 32 are united 'With the edges of blank 3|, while the joining area 39 of the two blanks near their upper right hand corner is diagonal and connects joined edges 31 and 38. By this arrangement strip 35 of blank 32 is free and serves as handle for ripping off the top blank and thereby freeing coloring bag 23'. To the upper end of longer blank 3|, there is preferably secured an attaching strap 40, whereby the device may be afiixed to wearing apparel or a part thereof.

The process of fabricating a life marker of the construction and physical properties indicated involves definite steps in its manufacture.

First the blank or blanks of the container have to be stamped or cut out from the impregnated material, whereuponfoilow the folding and sealing operations, as explained in connection with the first form of my device.

Unless the different steps in the production of my device are closely followed, the ultimate product will not possess the qualities required, and will render the device unsafe.

Although only specific forms of my invention are illustrated, be it understood that slight changes and improvements, for adapting the device to different uses, may be readily incorporated, and I therefore reserve for myself the right to make such changes and improvements without departing from the'broad scope of my invention as defined in the annexed claims.

I claim:

l. The method 'of producing a completely sealed, attachable container for carrying a watersoluble marking device, which method comprise the steps of blanking a substantially rectangular shape from a sheet of a flexible fabric impregnated and coated at both faces with a pressureheat-scalable, waterproof, pliable substance, said shape including a strip extending from and being substantially parallel with one of the short sides of the blank, and an elongated aperture located centrally and near one of the long sides of the blank; covering the aperture of the bag with a tape made of the same fabric and so that a substantial portion of the tape remains free, and uniting the tape with the edge areas of the aperture by subjecting them to pressure and heat; folding the blank so that the edge portions along its short sides overlap and the strip remains free within the folded blank, subjecting the overlapped edge portions to pressure and heat, thus uniting and sealing them to comprise a flat, tubular form, uniting and sealing the now adjacent bottom edges of that tubular form, as well as the lower side portions near the short ends of said aperture, thereby producing a bag open atone end; securing to said free strip within the bag a relatively long connecting member extending from a marking device placed into the bag; sealing the open end of the bag by subjecting it to pressure and heat, and securing to the sealed end a carrier for thebag.

2. In a device of the class indicated, the combination with a normally sealed, flexible and waterproof container secured along one edge to carrier means, of a water pervious receptacle,

holding a water soluble coloring and fluorescent substance, placed within the sealed container, waterproof means connecting said receptacle with the interior of the container for tethering it and for preventing its disengagement from the latter when the container is opened, one wall of the container having an aperture near its free edge, a rip-oil strip normally closing and sealing said aperture, which strip, when removed, will expose the aperture for the release of the receptacle from the container.

3. In a device of the class indicated, as set forth in claim 2, said rip-off strip being-adhesively secured to the container over the aperture by heat and pressure, whereby it is united with the container wall body areas adjacent the aperture, said strip being of a sufficient length that a substantial portion thereofextends beyond the container body to serve as grip or handle for ripping off the strip to clear said aperture.

4. In a device of the class indicated, the combinatlon with a normally sealed, flexible and waterproof container secured along one edge to carrier means, of a water pervious receptacle, holding a water soluble coloring and fluorescent substance, placed within the sealed container, means connecting said receptacle with the interior of the container for tethering it and for preventing its disengagement from the latter when the container is opened, one wall of the container having an aperture near its free edge, a rip-off strip normally closing and sealing said aperture, which strip, when removed, will expose the aperture for the release of the receptacle from the container.

5. A dye marker, adapted to be attached to a carrier, comprising the combination of a flexible waterproof envelope with a water-pervious receptacle containing a water-soluble coloring substance, a flexible tether connecting said receptacle to the interior of said envelope, said receptacle and said tether being normally enclosed and sealed within said envelope, and a pull tab means whereby the sealing of said envelope may be broken sufficiently to release said receptacle from said envelope; said envelope being formed froma flattened tube of water-impervious flexible material having a narrow rectangular opening in one face, said opening being adjacent, parallel to and extending slightly less than the width of one end of said tube; said end of said tube adjacent said opening being closed by a narrow waterproof seal which is folded away from said opening and secured to the other face of said tube by a second waterproof seal, the remaining end of said envelope being closed by a third waterprof seal which is folded about the central section of a long narrow flexible tape and secured thereto by a plurality of holding elements passing com letely through said fold and tape, said narrow rectangular opening being covered by a sheet of flexible water-impervious material normally secured to the face of said flattened tube'face about the edges of said opening by a fourth waterproofseal, a part of said second sheet extending beyond said envelope forming said pull tab means.

6. A dye marker, adapted to be attached to a carrier, comprising the combination of a flexible waterproof pocket with a water-pervious receptacle containing a water-soluble coloring substance, a flexible tether connecting said receptacle to the interior of said pocket, said receptacle and said tether being normally enclosed and sealed within said pocket, and a pull tab meanswhereby the sealing of said pocket may be broken sufficiently to release said receptacle from said pocket; said pocket being formed from flexible water-impervious sheet material and'having a narrow rectangular opening in one face, said opening extending substantially across said face parallel and adjacent to one end thereof, the end adjacent said opening bein closed by a waterproof seal, the opposite end being closed by a waterproof seal and secured to a long narrow flexible tape, said narrow opening being normally covered by a sheet of flexible waterproof material secured to said face about the edges of said opening by a waterproof seal, one edge of said second sheet extending beyond said pocket to form said pull tab means.

SYDNEY E. BENDER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Nu ber

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2459267 *Jul 16, 1947Jan 18, 1949Aerial Products IncSelf-contained emergency signaling device adapted to be operated automatically after being launched
US2690179 *Jan 20, 1950Sep 28, 1954Brown Fox DorothySyringe
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/.5, 441/6, 116/211, 53/477, 441/11, 53/455, 53/412
International ClassificationB63C9/00, B63C9/20
Cooperative ClassificationB63C9/20
European ClassificationB63C9/20