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Publication numberUS2419047 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 15, 1947
Filing dateMar 27, 1945
Priority dateMar 27, 1945
Publication numberUS 2419047 A, US 2419047A, US-A-2419047, US2419047 A, US2419047A
InventorsYoung Erving M
Original AssigneePatent & Licensing Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concealing siding panel joint
US 2419047 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 15 1947. YOUNG 2,419,047

CONCEALING SIDING PANEL JOINT 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 27, 1945 INVENTOR ATTORNEY u Patented Apr. 15, 1947 Erving M.

The Patent Young, East Orange, N. 1., assignor to and Licensing Corporation, New

York, N. Y., a corporation of Massachusetts Application March 27, 1945, Serial No. 585,049

Claims.

1 This invention relates to building siding material having a rigid,'fibrous panel base and an impressed or embossed face which simulates masonry such as brick work and interveningmortar joints. More particularly, this invention is concerned with the problem of concealing the joints between assembled panel units of the foregoing type having the masonry-simulating areas thereof surfaced with mineral particles or granules of one color, and the mortar joint-simulating areas thereof surfaced with mineral particles or granules of a different or blending color.

Heretofore, it has been diflicult with siding panels'of the above character effectively to conceal the actual joints between the assembled panels so as to achieve an appearance which closely simulates masonry or the like. These panels are commonly formed of rigid, fibre composition board which is surface impregnated with bituminous material, such as asphalt, coated with a waterproof asphaltic coating on the face thereof to be exposed, this coating being surfaced with mineral granules or particles of brick color applied to the brick-simulating areas and of contrasting color applied to the mortar joint-simulating areas. When such panels are applied to a building in interfitted, coplanar relation, it is impossible, as a practical matter, to obtain such uniform abutment of the edges of adjacent panels as will entirely conceal the joint lines or crevices between the panels. This failure is due particularly to irregularities in the cutting of the panels which prevents the desired erected relation therebetween, or to carelessness in their erection.

Actually, it is extremely difiicult, if not impossible, in the manufacture of the composition board to obtain the exact sizes desired. The minimum tolerances to which board manufacturers can ordinarily work are about 3 at each edge. Consequently, the horizontal edges of adjacent finlshed panels do not fit tightly together when ap plied in assembled relation to one another and the horizontal crevices occurring at the joints between these panels, even when skillfully applied, being of dark color, as compared to the color of the mineral granules applied to the brick-simulating areas as well as to those applied to the mortar joint-simulating areas, serve to set up the panel outline and destroy the desired illusion of an integral wall of natural masonry. 7

It is the primary object ofthe present invention to overcome the foregoing disadvantages by providing building siding panels having granules of brick color applied to the brick-simulating areas and contrastingly colored granules applied to the 2' mortar joint-simulating areas with simple and novel means along one longitudinal margin of each panel for effectively concealing the horizontal joints between adjacent assembled panels,

without requiring special skill or care in their assemblage.

In accordance with the present invention, the foregoing and related objects may be attained by providing a rabbet, cutout or recess along one longitudinal margin of a rectangularly formed, ship-lapped panel blank. This recess is filled with asphaltic coating, when the latter is applied to the face of the panel that is to be exposed. The coating, particularly the portion which fills the recess, is surfaced with granular material so that there may be provided, along the longitudinal margin defined by the coating-filled recess, a rolled, compacted masonry-colored granular surface which extends substantially the entire depth of the recess slightly beyond the edge of the panel which is to abut an edge of an overlapped panel. In this manner, I effect a tight joint between the abutting panels, thereby effectively concealing any joint crevices that may be formed, unavoidably or otherwise, between said abutting panels.

Other advantages and features of the invention will become readily apparent in the following description and the accompanying drawing in which,

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a masonry simulating siding panel;

Fig. 2 is a similar view of three such sidin panels showing the manner in which they are laid in coplanar, abutting relation to form an exterior covering for a side wall;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view, in perspective, of a masonry simulating siding panel embodying the invention;

Fig. 4 isa fragmentary sectional view of vertilines 4-4 of Fig. 2 and illustrating particularly the manner in which the present invention serves effectively to conceal the joints or crevices therebetween, and

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view diagrammatically illustrating the manner in which the rabbeted marginal edge ofa panel may be provided with an overhanging rolled, compacted masonry colored granular surface.

Referring to Fig. 1 of the drawings, the numeral l0 designates a panel of building siding material. This panel preferably comprises a substantially rigid base of fibre insulation board II, generally rectangular in shape, and provided with ship-lap flanges I! at one longitudinal and one transverse edge thereof, while the other two edges of the panel are formed in complementary relation to the first-named edges by undercutting thereof to provide projecting ship-lap flanges l3. Thus, the upper face of the flange l3 formsa continuation of the face of the panel. These panels are adapted to be applied in abutting, coplanar relation, with the ship-lap flange l3 of one panel overlapping the complementary flange l2 of the adjoining panel, as illustrated in Figs. 2 and 4, to form a water-tight joint therebetween.

In accordance with the present invention, the panel blank H, in addition to being properly cut to size and provided with complementary shiplap flanges l2 and I3, as previously described, is provided with a rabbet, notch or recess 25 extend-. ing for the entire length along one longitudinal edge of the blank. As bestshown in Fig. 3, this recess or rabbet 25 has its sides or faces 26 and '21 extending preferably, although not essentially,

at right angles to each other.

The panel blank thus provided may then be impregnated with asphalt or other similar bituniinous material in order to stiffen the board and bind the surface fibres together against delamination. The approximate extent of this surface impregnation is indicated by the stippled border areas, as at I4. The exposed face of the thus impregnated panel base is then coated with a layer of thermoplastic asphaltic coating material 15, such as high melt point asphalt, combined with suitable filler material. In addition to forming a layer of substantial thickness on the flat surface of the blank, the coating will also flow over the edge thereof and fill the recess or rabbet 25 substantially to the level of the layer on the flat surface so as to be continuous there with. As the asphalt layer l5 cools, it becomes bonded to the surface and will be retained in the rabbet 25 so as to completely fill the latter, thus providing an additional thickness of coating along this edge of the panel base.

While the coating layer, including the vertically extending portion thereof along the filled recess, is still in a plastic, adhesive condition, it is surfaced with granular material ifi of mineral character-and of suitable color to simulate conventional brick, stone or the like. These granules i6 may be partially imbedded in the coating, as by the application of suitable roll pressure. Subsequently, granular material it of similar character, but of a different or distinguishing color to simulate mortar, may be applied over the entire flat upper surface. The blank may then be subjected to a selective embossing operation which partially imbeds the second layer of granules only in those areaswhich are to simulate mortar joints, while at the same time forming uniformly spaced narrow grooves 29 to give the desired relief effect. After the second colored layer i8 has been pressed in the desired pattern, the excess granules not imbedded in the coating, particularly those cov-, ering the masonry-simulations, may be removed in any suitable manner to expose the masonrysimulating areas H separated and set on in relief by the diiferently colored mortar joint-simulating grooves 20.

In the case of brickwork, the masonry simulating areas I! take the form of oblong-shaped formations of suitable width and length to simulate brick arranged in horizontal rows or courses, generally five in number, and in staggered order. As shown in Fig. 1, the upper longitudinal edge of the panel is defined by a continuous horizontal mortar joint-simulation 20 and each of the succeeding rows or courses are spaced apart by a similarly extending mortar joint-simulation of uniform width. The adjacent brick-like formations [1 in each row or course are spaced apart or set off from each other by a. vertical mortar joint-simulation 2|. Atv the lower longitudinal edge of the panel, the spaced brick-like formations extend to the very edge thereof, thus defining and constituting a part of the projecting ship-lap flange l3. At the ends of the alternate rows or courses there are formed part-brick formations lla which are of the same character, material and width as the whole-brick formations H but different therefrom in length. The lengths of the two end part-brick formations Na in each of these alternate rows, when combined, are equal to the length of the individual intermediate whole-brick formations. A series of uniformly spaced narrow grooves 22, simulating wirescorings, are formed transversely on all of the part Ibrick formations and on some of the intermediate 7 whole-brick formations, as shown.

When the panels are joined endwise in abutting coplanar relation, as shown in Fig. 2, the partbricks of one panel abut against'the part-bricks of the other, thus overlapping the vertical joint between the units and serving effectively to conceal said joint.

In the further practice of the present invention, the filled and granule surfaced rabbeted margin of the panel is subjected to a. rolling and compacting operation preceding the aforedescribed embossing operation and, preferably, immediately following the step of applying the layer of mineral granules l6 and partially imbedding this layer in the coating.

In this operation, illustrated in Fig. 5, the panel It! may be conveyed by supporting rollers 35, or

other suitable means, into contacting position with a roller wheel 36 in such 'manner' that the vertical edge is of the projecting ship-lap flange l3 will abut against the roller. The roller wheel may be formed of wood or other suitable material and, as shown, is provided with a reduced upper portion 38, having a radius approximately to 1%" less than that of the lower portion and having its horizontal face 39 substantially aligned with the horizontal face 26 of the rabbet 25. The rqller wheel will freely rotate about its vertical axis 31 as the edge H! of the advancing ship-lap flange [3 of the panel is brought into contact therewith. This edge l9 serves as a firm guide to permit the periphery 40 of the reduced portion 38 to compact and shape uniformly the vertically extending granule surface 6 5.

The roller wheel permits the rolled, compacted and adhesively anchored granule surfaced layer to extend somewhat beyond the vertical edge IQ of the ship-lap flange l3, thus providing an overhang of say 3% to 1%" depending upon the radius of the reduced portion of the wheel.

There is thus provided a simple but effective means for concealing the panel joint or crevice between two adjacent assembled panels and thus carry out the illusion of a wall of natural masonry. It will be observed with this construction that when a plurality of panels it) are properly arranged in edge abutment and in coplanar relation, the lower overhanging longitudinal edge 45, of the projecting ship-lap flange 93, formed as above described, will be abutted against the edge 43 of the ship-lap flange l2 forming the horizontal edge of the uppermost mortar jointsimulating groove 20. The coating and the granavoidably may be formed ules at the edges 45, 46 may readily be caused by slight pressure to become intermingled or interlaced with one another, thus effectively concealing any opening or crevice that may otherwise be exposed. Such an opening or crevice that unbecause of irregular cutting of the panel blanks or may be formed due to careless erection, as previously indicated, is shown at 48, although this showing is somewhat exaggerated for illustrative purposes.

In addition to concealing the panel character of the constituent siding material, the provision of the rabbet along the margin of the panel in accordance with the present invention possesses further advantages which may be referred to briefly. For example, the additional volume of panel coating filling the rabbet offers a measure of added protection against any possible injury or damage that may occur to this projecting marginal edge ofeach of the panels during storage, transportation and application. Then, too, the additional bonding surface thus afforded between the coating and the impregnated surface of the panel blank tends to lengthen the life of the panel along that critical area which is subjected to erosive action by the drainage of rain water from the surfaces of the assembled panels.

The present invention thus renders it'possible to provide siding panels surfaced with difierent colors of mineral particles or granules arranged respectively to simulate masonry faces and separating mortar joint lines which, when applied to a building in assembled coplanar relation, produce an effect pleasing to the eye and, at the same time, present the appearance of a well simulated masonry wall.

I claim:

' l. A siding member adapted to be applied to a building wall in interfitted horizontal alignment with like members, comprising a rigid base panel of rectangular configuration having a rabbeted recess extending longitudinally on the exposed face thereof along one longitudinal margin, said face including said recess being coated with a layer of asphalt and surfaced with mineral granules, the granules being of one color along narrow linear portions simulating mortar joints and being of a contrasting color along spaced areas simulating bricks arranged in horizontal rows in staggered order, the spaced brick formations in the row immediately adjacent said longitudinal margin each having aid surfaced coating l y thereon extending into and filling the rabbeted recess to the full depth thereof, the exposed surface of said surfaced coating layer in said rabbeted recess. lying in substantially a common plane with the exposed surface of said surfaced coating layer on the last named row of brick formations.

2. A siding member adapted to be applied to a building wall in interfitted horizontal alignment with like members, comprising a rigid base panel of rectangular configuration having the exposed face thereof coated with asphalt and surfaced with mineral granules of one color along narrow linear portions simulating mortar joints and with mineral granules of a contrasting color along spaced areas simulating brick formations arranged in horizontal rows in staggered order, one longitudinal and one transverse edge of said panel having a spect thereto, the opposite longitudinal and transverse edges having complementary-formed ship-lap flanges, said first-named. longitudinalship-lap flange offset with re-.

edge being defined by a continuously extending mortar joint-simulation, said opposite longitudinal edge having a recess filled with coating and surfaced with granules which extend beyond said edge and define the lowermost edges of the brick formations, thereby serving to effect a tight abutment with the mortar joint-simulation of a vertically adjoining member and conceal the horizontal course arrangement of the horizontally aligned members on a wa 3. A siding member adapted to be applied to a building wall in interfitted horizontal alignment with like members, comprising a rigid base panel of rectangular configuration having the exposed face thereof coated with asphalt and surfaced with mineral granules of one color along narrow linear portions simulating mortar joints and with mineral granules of a contrasting color along spaced areas simulating brick formations arranged in horizontal rows in staggered order, one longitudinal edge of the panel being defined by a continuously extending mortar joint-simulation, the opposite longitudinal edge having a recess filled with coating and surfaced with granules which extend beyond said edge and define the boundary edge of the brick formations along said last-named longitudinal edge, thereby serving to effects. tight abutment with the mortar joint-simulation of a vertically adjoining member and conceal the horizontal course arrangement of the horizontally aligned members on a wall.

4. A siding member adapted to be applied to a building wall in interfitted horizontal alignment with like members, comprising a rigid base panel of rectangular configuration having a rabbeted recess extending longitudinally on the exposed face thereof along the lower longitudinal margin of the panel, said face and said recess being coated with a layer of asphalt and surfaced with mineral granules, the granules being of one color along narrow linear portions formulating mortar joints and being of a contrasting color along spaced areas simulating bricks arranged in horizontal rows in staggered order, the spaced brick formations in the row immediately adjacent said lower longitudinal margin each having said surfaced coating layer thereon extending into and filling the rabbeted recess to the full depth thereof, the exposed surface of said surfaced coating layer in said rabbeted recess lying in substantially a common plane with the exposed surface of said surfaced coating layer on the last named row of brick formations.

5. A siding member adapted to be applied to a building wall in interfitted horizontal alignment with like members, comprising a rigid base panel of rectangular configuration having a rabbeted recess extending longitudinally on the exface thereof along the lower longitudinal panel, said face and said recess a layer of asphalt and surposed margin of the being coated with faced with mineral of one color along narrow lating mortar joints and color along spaced areas simulating bricks arranged in horizontal rows in staggered order, the spaced brick formations in the row immediately adjacent said lower longitudinal margin each having said surfaced coating layer thereon extending into and filling the rabbeted recess to linear portions formubeing of a contrasting the full depth thereof, and extending slightly beyond the lower edge of the panel, the exposed surface of said surfaced coating layer in said rabbeted recess lying in substantially a comgranules, the granules being 8 e mon plane with the exposed surface of said surm TES TENTS faced coating layer on the last named row 0! STA PA brick formations. Number Name Date ERVING M. YOUNG. 2,278,289 Snyder Mar. 31, 1942 5 2,270,808 Kaye Jan. 21, 1942 REFERENCES CITE) 2,359,845 I Harshberger Oct. 10, 1944 The following references are of record in the 2021579 Odell 1935 file of this patent:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2021579 *Dec 7, 1933Nov 19, 1935Building Products LtdOrnamented wall board siding for outside weatherproofing
US2270808 *Mar 3, 1941Jan 20, 1942Lee Kaye RobertBuilding unit
US2278289 *Nov 12, 1940Mar 31, 1942Mastic Asphalt CorpMasonry simulating material
US2359845 *Feb 11, 1941Oct 10, 1944Carbide & Carbon Chem CorpSurface covering material and process of making the same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7121051 *Feb 10, 2003Oct 17, 2006Garrick HunsakerPanel for thin bricks and related systems and methods of use
US7299594 *Aug 6, 2003Nov 27, 2007Chornenky Todd EBrick patterned shelving
US7735277 *Feb 6, 2008Jun 15, 2010Clint EverhartSimulated brick building panel
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/314, 52/315
International ClassificationE04F13/14
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/147
European ClassificationE04F13/14J