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Publication numberUS2419611 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1947
Filing dateApr 30, 1943
Priority dateApr 30, 1943
Publication numberUS 2419611 A, US 2419611A, US-A-2419611, US2419611 A, US2419611A
InventorsWalsh Allen A
Original AssigneeRca Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shock mount for collapsible antennae
US 2419611 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 29, 1947. WALSH 2,419,611.

SHOCK MOUNT FOR GOLLAPSIBLE ANTENNAS Filed April so, 1943 X7Z-7V0ED W! fig I Z X 5 1 J 70 RAD/0 m m/aw) IN ENTOR ALLEN A ALSH. PFTEACTEQ, BY

J v I ATTORNEY Patented Apr. 29,1947

SHOCK MOUNT FOR COLLAPSIBLE ANTENNAE Allen A. Walsh, West Englewood, N. J assignor to Radio Corporation of America, a corporation of Delaware Application April 30, 1943, Serial No. 485,122

This invention relates to a new and useful shock absorbing antenna mount.

An object of this invention is to provide a simple and eificient flexible mount for an antenna which is particularly adapted for absorbing mechanical shocks and the prevention of mechanical injury.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved telescoping antenna structure which is made up of component parts, some of which are capable of being employed as additional or series loading inductance in the antenna.

A feature of this invention is the arrangement of a mounting plate coupled together with an antennasleeve by means of a coil spring, the antenna member being arranged to be extended or retracted through the sleeve spring and mounting plate. The antenna mount of this invention makes possible the use of a telescoping antenna with a resilient spring mount arranged to prevent mechanical iniury to the extended portion of the antenna. The antenna mount of this invention is particularly useful with portable radio apparatus, such as transmitters and receivers wherein it is desirable to have a built-in antenna made of telescoping sections so that it may be adjusted to any desired length and when not in use collapsed into the main assembly. Antennae of this type, as known in the prior art, are usually constructed in several sections of thin wall metal tubing which are often damaged beyond repair by merely striking some object sufficiently hard to bend a tube section.

This application is a further improvement in antennae of the type shown by a Hathaway Paterlt 2,161,707 dated June 6, 1939.

This invention will best be understood by referring to the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is an elevation of the antenna mounting of this invention,

Fig. 2 is a plan view of Fig. 1,

Fig. 3 is a diagram showing the antenna member connected to form a series loading inductance, and

Fig. 4 is a sectional detail showing a modification of Fig. 1.

Referring now to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing, the fundamental portion of the antenna 1 comprises two or more pieces of thin wall metal tubes IA, IB and IC which are arranged to telescope within each other. A base plate 2 is provided with suitable apertures 3 for mounting the antenna to the desired apparatus which ma be that of a radio receiving or transmitting set. There is also provided a lower coil support 1 which is secured by suitable means, such as threading or a 5 Claims. (Cl. 250-33) sliding fit to the mounting plate 2. An antenna sleeve 4 is located slightly above the base plate 2 and is secured thereto by means of an inductive helical coil spring 5 of metal, and is fastened to members 1 and 4 by any suitable means such as, for example, by welding or soldering. With the antenna I extended the bottom section fits tightly into the swaged tube 6 to make good electrical connection, also so that any mechanical shock is transmitted to the coil spring which will absorb the shock and thus prevent damage to the extended sections. When the antenna is not in use, it may be collapsed as shown in a retracted position as indicated by the dash and dot lines. The top end of tube IA is terminated with a small metallic ball 9.

As shown by Figs. 3 and 4 the coil spring 5 may be used as a series loading inductance by selecting the number of turns and the diameter of the helix to obtain the required amount of series inductance. When the antenna is used in this manner, the electrical connection is made between the antenna assembly portion above member I and the appaartus at the mounting plate 2. If it is desired to use the spring mount without the additional'series inductance, the antenna sleeve I4 should be made of a non-conducting material such as, for example, Bakelite or Isolantite. Other portions of the antenna are insulated to obtain the desired electrical circuit characteristics. Electrical connection is then made by a single flexible conductor 15 connected to the swaged tube 6 and the apparatus and also through the inside of the coil spring 5.

While I have indicated and described a system for carrying my invention into eifect, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that my invention is by no means limited to the particular mechanism shown and described, but that many modifications may be made without departing from the scope of my invention.

What I claim is:

l. A collapsible antenna mount comprising a metallic tube serving as the antenna member, a base mounting plate having a plurality of apertures therein for securing it to radio apparatus, an antenna sleeve member, a spring support member secured to said mounting plate, a helical spring wound with open spaced turns and electrically fastened to said antenna sleeve and said spring support member to serve as a series loading inductive coil for said antenna circuit, and means within said mounting plate and sleeve member for permitting the passage of said antenna member.

2. A collapsible antenna member 'having in combination a metallic tube, a swaged tube secured to an end of said metallic tube, a sleeve member surrounding said swaged tube and a portion of said metallic tube, an inductive coil spring member secured to said sleeve member, a coil support, an antenna, base mounting plate coupled to said coil support, said inductive coil spring member being electrically connected in series between said coil support and said swaged tube to make electrical connection to said metallic tube by having said coil serve as a series loading inductance for said antenna.

3. A collapsible antenna member including a plurality of telescoping metallic tubes, a sleeve member for supporting said telescoping metallic tubes, a helical spring member acting as an inductive coil, a coil support member, a base mounting plate for retaining said coil support member, said helical spring member being electrically connected in series between said support member-and said antenna member to serve as a series loading inductance for said antenna.

4, A collapsible antenna comprising a plurality of telescoping tubes serving as the antenna, a base mounting plate having a central aperture therein for the passage of said telescoping tubes therethrough when in the collapsed position, an antenna sleeve surrounding the outermost of said telescoping metallic tubes, a metallic spring support member threaded to be secured to said base mounting plate, a helical spring wound with open spaced turns electrically fastened to said antenna sleeve and one end of said spring support member, whereby the helical spring serves as a series loading inductive coil for said antenna and also serves to absorb mechanical shocks for the prevention of mechanical injury thereof.

5. A collapsible antenna comprising a plurality of telescoping tubes serving as the anntenna, a base mounting plate having a central aperture therein for the passage of said telescoping tubes therethrough when in the collapsed position, an antenna sleeve surrounding, the outermost of said telescoping metallic tubes, a metallic spring support member threaded to be electrically secured to said base mounting plate, a helical spring Wound With open spaced turns electrically fastened to said antenna sleeve and one end of said spring support member arranged to serve as series loading inductance in the antenna circuit and to permit removal of said helical spring for selecting other springs having a different number of turns and a different diameter to obtain another required amount of series inductance for said antenna circuit.

ALLEN A. WALSH.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,144,038 Trump Jan. 17, 1939 2,098,388 l-Iruska Nov. 9, 1937 2,161,707 Hathaway June 6, 1939 2,207,692 McPherson July 9, 1940 2,180,107 Hathaway Nov. 14, 1939 2,206,820 Mydlil July 2, 1940

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2098388 *Nov 30, 1935Nov 9, 1937Rca CorpDeflectable antenna
US2144038 *Oct 24, 1936Jan 17, 1939Rca CorpAerial and aerial mounting arrangement
US2161707 *Nov 10, 1937Jun 6, 1939Rca CorpAntenna
US2180107 *Feb 25, 1937Nov 14, 1939Rca CorpShort wave transmitter
US2206820 *Dec 7, 1938Jul 2, 1940Galvin Mfg CorpAntenna system
US2207692 *Mar 23, 1937Jul 9, 1940Mcpherson John BControllable radio aerial
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2493787 *Mar 19, 1946Jan 10, 1950Torretti Theodore TAntenna
US2546026 *Apr 15, 1947Mar 20, 1951Gen ElectricFlexible antenna mounting
US2771604 *Apr 3, 1951Nov 20, 1956Goldstein Samuel EVehicular short-wave antenna
US2903694 *Dec 26, 1956Sep 8, 1959Hi Lo Tv Antenna CorpAntenna structure
US2945084 *Jan 24, 1958Jul 12, 1960Donal C WeaverFlexible connector for aerials or the like
US3251063 *Jan 30, 1964May 10, 1966Edward MckeeResonant v-type antenna with center loading effected by coil formed integrally with radiating element
US4121218 *Aug 3, 1977Oct 17, 1978Motorola, Inc.Adjustable antenna arrangement for a portable radio
US4540989 *Jul 5, 1983Sep 10, 1985Motorola, Inc.Whip antenna assembly exhibiting increased durability
US4914450 *Jan 31, 1985Apr 3, 1990The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyHigh frequency whip antenna
US5670968 *Jul 21, 1993Sep 23, 1997Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Retractable flexible transmit/receive antenna which operates in a collapsed and extended position
US6127979 *Feb 27, 1998Oct 3, 2000Motorola, Inc.Antenna adapted to operate in a plurality of frequency bands
US6275198Jan 11, 2000Aug 14, 2001Motorola, Inc.Wide band dual mode antenna
US7443361Dec 1, 2006Oct 28, 2008Intermec Ip Corp.Frangible antenna mount
US20070182661 *Dec 1, 2006Aug 9, 2007Clark HaynesFrangible antenna mount
USD748079 *Apr 30, 2014Jan 26, 2016Wilson Electronics, LlcAntenna
WO2014144261A2 *Mar 14, 2014Sep 18, 2014Medusa Scientific LlcElectric field sensing and e field visualization
WO2014144261A3 *Mar 14, 2014Jan 29, 2015Medusa Scientific LlcElectric field sensing and e field visualization
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/749, 343/901, 343/900, D14/233, 343/888, 343/750, 343/828
International ClassificationH01Q1/08
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q1/085
European ClassificationH01Q1/08D