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Publication numberUS2423589 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 8, 1947
Filing dateNov 22, 1943
Priority dateNov 22, 1943
Publication numberUS 2423589 A, US 2423589A, US-A-2423589, US2423589 A, US2423589A
InventorsEricson George R
Original AssigneeEricson George R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Engine control device
US 2423589 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jul 8, 1947.

G. R. ERICSON ENGINE CONTROL DEVI CE Filed Nov. 22, 1943 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY y 1947. G. R. ERICSON ENGINE CONTROL DEVICE S Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 22, 1943 INVENTOR.

FIG.10.

F'IG.5.

ATTORNEY v July 8, 1947. s. R. ERICSON ENGINE CONTROL DEVICE 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. 22, 1943 F'IG.6.

- INVENTOR.

FIG.8.Y

ATTQRNEX Patented July 8, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICEv ENGINE CONTROL DEVICE George R. Ericson, Kirkwood, M0. Application November 22,, 1943, Serial No. 511,371

18 Claims. 1

This application relates to engine control devices and more particularly to the type of controls known as half motor cut outs for multi-cylinder engines in which the supply of fuel to the cylinders is discontinued when the engine is running under light load. The device shown herein may be considered to be an improvement on the device shown in my previously filed application, Serial No. 483,795, filed April 20, 1943, for an Engine control device.

One object of the invention is to provide a half motor cut out in which the suction drag is completely eliminated from the cylinders which are not being suplied with fuel.

A further object of the invention is to provide a device of the above described character in which the transfers from half to full motor operation and back to half motor operation are accomplished without sharp changes in engine torque.

Another object of the invention is to provide a half motor cut out having a governing action so that the supply of fuel to the engine will automatically be increased or decreased in accordance with slight changes in torque required by road conditions.

Other objects of the invention will appear from the following specification and accompanying drawings referring to which Fi l is a diagram of the functioning parts of the device which are pertinent to this invention.

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic vertical sectional view of a carburetor having the control device applied thereto.

Fig. 3 is a diagram indicating a plan view of an eight-in-line engine having my invention applied thereto.

Fig. 4 is a. sectional view taken along the lines 4-4 of Fig. 2 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 5 is a detail view showing the parts at the lower end of the snatcher pump shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 6 is a diagrammatic side elevation of parts of the valve mechanism for controlling the damper valves shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 7 is a detail sectional view showing the parts of the damper valve and the snatcher pump mechanism in a different operating position.

Fig. 8 is an enlarged sectional View of the snatcher pump piston.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged view of the push rod mechanism.

Fig. 10 is an enlarged view of the vacuum control valve.

Referring to the drawings, the reference numeral I 0 indicates an internal combustion engine which may be of the eight-cylinder-in-line type as shown. The cylinders are numbered 1 to 8, inclusive, and are supplied by two separate manifolds II and I2 of which manifold ll supplies fuel to the inner group of four cylinders and the manifold 12 supplies fuel to the cylinder numbered 1, 2, 7 and 8. The firing order and crankshaft arrangement are such that one cylinder in each group fires at intervals of of crankshaft movement. The explosions of one cylinder group are equally spaced between the explosions of the other group so that the engine may run steadily on either four or eight cylinders. For convenience, the cylinder groups are designated as A and S, as indicated in Fig. 3, group A being the auxiliary group which is cut in and out of operation and S is the steady running group. The risers or inlets of the two intake manifolds A and S are indicated at I3 and [4, respectively, and the fuel flow to these groups is supplied by carburetors l5 and I6 which are here indicated as combined in a dual carburetor having sufficient partition means I! to separate the two mixture passages.

The carburetors may be supplied from a single constant level chamber generally indicated at l8 in which the fuel lever is controlled by conventional float mechanism I 9. Air inlets 20 and 2| are controlled by automatic chokes 22 and 23 mounted on shafts 24 and 25 which may be integral or separately operated as desired. Thermostat mechanism has been indicated at 26 and 21 but the control of the choke valves may be manual or automatic as desired. The full details of the choke mechanism are not shown herein, but reference is had to the patent to Cofiey #2,325,372 in which the complete mechanism is described. Carburetor It for the cylinder group S contains all the mechanism of a modern carburetor including Venturi stack 28, main nozzle 29, accelerating pump 30 operated by throttle valve 3| through rocker arm 3.2 and suitable connecting linkage, metering rod 33 and idle passage 34. It may be noted that the metering rod has a valve portion 35 which varies 0r cuts off the supply of fuel to the main nozzle and to the idle passage 34. The metering rod valve may be opened by opening movement of the throttle when the lip 35 on the rocker arm 31 lifts the cross pin 38 which carries the metering rod. The cross pin is connected to the piston 39 which is spring-held in upward position except when drawn downwardly by suction applied through the passage 40.

tion by spring #8 which is comparatively wealc:

with respect to the spring 59 which will hereafter be described. The valve a1 is provided with a stem 5% extending into the Y-shaped-passageway 5i which connects the fuel jet 52 with the main nozzle. The outerendof this-passagethe auxiliary main nozzle as well as controllingthe valve .411, and supplying extra fuel when the auxiliary cylinders. are. first supplied with fuel.

The snatcher pump also; contains means for controlling the operation of the damper valves to. smooth out'tlie. transfer to and from full motor operation. 1

The snatcher pump .53comprises a cylinder receiving a packed piston 5d.which includes body member 5.5, packing leathers, 5t; and separating rings 5?. Thebody. member. is rivetedover the retaining ringsasindicated at- Edit-o form a compact and leakproof assembly.

The piston 54 is providecrwith a substantially cylindrical recesstoreceive a-second cylinder 59 which maybe termedthe,p ush rod cylinder. This cylinder contains. a piston 60.. operated by the springeflfwhich is trong enough to overcomethefspring 38. which normally seats the valve ll. The iston fiii'also, carries arod 61 to contactithevalve' stem 5E. Rod (H is slidably and'snuglymountedin a bore in the upper endof the. snatcher pump, the passage of'fuel being permitted by additional bores 62 laterally; spaced but parallel with the rod 6 l.

A valve 63' is slidably mounted on the rodfii with .a very sli'ght'clearance'to permitrestrictedflbw. of fuelbletween the'bore of. the valve and;the rod. Said valve ESis providedvvith'a valve seat member Ed'soas ,to close after. a slight downwardmovement of the rod 6| or as a result' of backliow of" fuel=through the passage. The valve is preventedfrom closing in the. other direction by ashoulder 65 formed at its upper end.

Piston 54' is normally biased upwardly by spring 66. whichis strong, enough to overcome springefiand compressv the sprin 49,.but weak enoughto b'eoyercomeby vacuum produced in the manifold l2 when the. engine is running under comparativelylight load. Whilethe amount ofjvacuum requiredto overcome the spring 66 maybe varied lhave foundthat a springbalanced'to 7" or 8" of mercury gives satisfactory results. The spring 66 acts against a perforated headfi'i connected to rod 68 which is'provided with-a head GQat the other end in contact with the, piston 54; The snatcherpumpis providedwith screw threads at its lower end to receive a head H! provided witha vacuum connection to the inner'end ofthe damper valve cylinder which will hereinafter be described, While the body ofv the snatcher pump is pro vided with a vacuum connection 7'2; from the in: take manifold l2. This connection is provided with a branch which is connected to the damper valve cylinder at 9 i. The head 10 is provided with a valve seat .3 controlled by valve '14 which is slidably mounted the rod $8. The valve M is provided with a transverse slot '55 which receives a spring friction member 16. This member also extends through slot H in the cylinder extension 53 of the head iii. A small amount of upand-down play 'iswpermitted to permit the flow of airwhen the. valve-is opened.

Damper valves l9 and 59a are provided for f carburetors i5 and I6, respectively. Valve 79 does not completely close the passageway 13 and may iliary carburetor to bring the main nozzle into he-slightly-u-nbalanced as desired. Valve 19 permits the-passage of enough air through the auxfull operationevcn when the valve is closed.

Valve "F911 is also slightly cut away so as not to completely close passage H3. The amount of flow permitted through passage i4 when the valve we isclosed is limited .to an amount which, added to the amount flowing past valve l9 in closed position, Will'bliilg the total, 't-orqueof the engine up to a pointslightly above the maximum torque for half motor operation. In other words, the valves 19 and 59a are closed sufiiciently to prevent a sudden increase of torque when the motor is changed from half operation to full operation.

The valves 19 and'lSa are mountedon shafts 8c and 8!, respectively, which are shownsepa rately. but may actually be thesame shaft extendedv It will be understood'that allthe drawings are in diagrammatic, form for the purposeof clearer illustration. The shafts and 8 l as shown herein; are connected by a link,82 attached to levers 83; and 84; respectively, and operated by link 85 connected to thedampervalve piston 86. This piston is normally held b the springB'l 'in position to close the valves le'and'lea, but this spring may be overcome by vacuum applied through passage H to the cylinder 88which is rigidly. mounted on the body of the carburetor as by the bracket 89.

The inner end of the cylinder 88 is provided with a connection 'H9l which is connectedto the base of the snatcher pump. It may be noted that'the connections ii. and 72' are connectedin series through the valve 14." The common outlet to the inlet manifold is restricted by a plug 90, so that the total suction applied may be cali-. brated in accordance with the strength of the various springs andother connections: The connection H is provided with a restricted'air inlet I90 which is slightly smaller thanthe outlet 99'. This difierence insize is to insure sufficient overlap action;

The main throttle shaft 92 is provided with the usual main operating means including-a closing spring- I94 and is also provided with a lever 93 having a link 94 pivoted thereto, as indicatedat 95; A lost' motion slot 96- slidably receives the pin 91 carried bylever 83 in such a manner that avfull opening movement of' the main throttle valve results in a full opening movement of the damper valve, but no opening movement ofthe damper'va-lveoccurs until themain throttle is approximately one-half'open; This result is obtained by providing a longer operatingradiusfor the pin 95 than for the pin 91;

In certain installations having a comm0n.ex-

' haust manifold for main and auxiliary cylinders,

back-firing in the exhaust may occur, whentl'ie fuel supply to the auxiliary group is discontinued. This back-firing may be eliminated either by cutting 01rthe ignition to the cylinders, when the engine is over-running or coas ting, or by' cutting 01f the supply of fuel to the main cylinders under the same conditions; In this connection, it should be noted that the back-firing does not occur when the main cylinders are in full operation, nor even when the engine is idling on the main cylinders, but onlywhen, due to the closing of the throttle when the engine is running faster than normal idling speed, some of the charges of mixture are ejected from the main cylinders without being burned. This condition may; obviously, be eliminated by cutting off the supply of fuel to the main cylinders during overrunning or coasting, and any suitable means for that purpose may be employed such, for instance, as shown in my Patent 2,036,205, issued April '7, 1936, but in installations where fuel cut-off cannot be conveniently installed, I have provided a b ack-fire switch constructed in the following manner, with particular reference to Fig. 1:

The main carburetor I6 is provided with a boss 98 having a cylinder 99 containing piston I normally pressed outwardly by the spring IOI. The cylinder has a, port I02 communicating with the bore of the carburetor at a point adjacent the edge of the throttle when it is in closed position. The exact location of the bore is just on the posterior side of the throttle when it is fully closed, so that the slightest opening movement of the throttle beyond the normal idling position will result in exposure of the port to pressure existing in the carburetor mixing chamber.

Terminals I03 and I04 having contact portions I05 and I06 are provided in a head I01 formed of insulating material and mounted in the end of the cylinder. The terminal I06 is mounted on a rod which is slidably mounted in the bore I08 and biased toward open position by spring I09 which may be overcome by the spring IIlI to close the contact at the terminals I05 and I06, except when abnormal suction exists posterior to the throttle, as when coasting. The outer end of the piston II!!! is exposed to atmosphere through a passage IIO which is cut off or restricted by the contact terminal I06 which is in the form of a disk and acts as a valve to close against the end of the passage I I0, A smaller restricted passageway III may be provided to admit a restricted flow of air to the outer end of the cylinder.

It will be understood that the members I03 and I04 are connected into the ignition circuit in such a manner as to cause breaking of the circuit whenever the terminal I06 is moved away from terminal I05.

The location of the port I02 is important, because it may not be desirable to cut off the ignition in driving down a hill which is not quite steep enough to cause coasting of the car at the desired speed. The operator, accordingly opens the throttle slightly to give the desired power and thus produce a suction in the outlet of the carburetor I6 which is beyond the normal idling suction and, therefore, capable of breaking the ignition circuit at the terminals IDS-I06. By arranging the position of the port I02 as shown with respect to the throttle valve, the slight opening of the throttle by the operator prevents the application of the increased suction to the piston I00 and the resultant breaking of the ignition circuit.

It will be understood that the piston I00 may not form a perfect seal with the cylinder 99 and, accordingly, some air should be allowed to enter the outerend of the cylinder as through the port III. In order to prevent hunting of the engine during idling, restricted port III and port IIO are capable of supplying more air to the cylinders than can leak through the clearance between the piston and cylinder walls. When the member I06 is in contact with the terminal I05, port IIil is restricted or cut off and thus the air in the outer end of the cylinder is subjected to la slightbalancing action due to the fact that passage III is of less capacity than the leak between the cylinder wall and the piston. This results in a tendency of the piston I00 to remain in position to close the contacts until a higher suction than that which is necessary to hold it in the other position has been attained, for instance, the contact units IDs-I06 may not be broken until. at least 20" of mercury vacuum has been produced in the carburetor outlet, but a suction of 19" of mercury will hold the piston against the spring II-JI to cause the contacts to remain in open position. Stated differently, there is a snap action or an overlapping action which prevents hunting of an engine during idling which permits the operator to readily secure an idling adjustment which will take care of difierent motor conditions.

It will be understood that the intake manifolds II and I2 are kept entirely separate by means of the partition [1 so as to prevent disturbance of the mixture in the main carburetor when the damper valve in the auxiliary carburetor is opened or closed.

In normal operation under comparatively light loads, the main cylinder group S supplied by the manifold I2 and carburetor I5 is capable of producing the necessary power. Under these conditions, the throttle 3| is not fully open, and a substantial degree of manifold vacuum is maintained posterior to the throttle. This vacuum is communicated through the restricted passageway 90 to conduit 12.

For most engines, it is desirable to operate on four cylinders until the vacuum in the No. 1 or main carburetor drops to approximately '7" of mercury, As long as the suction in the intake manifold I2 is at or above 7 of mercury, the suction conveyed through the plug 90 and the branched conduit I2 to the cylinders 88 and 53 is sufficient to hold the pistons 86 and 54 against their respective springs 81 and 66. This position is shown in Figure 2 and corresponding position of the piston is shown in Figure 6.

The damper valves I9 and 19a are held in wide open position, thus preventing any suction drag on the auxiliary cylinder group served by the manifold I I and allowing the flow of fuel mixture through the manifold I2 to cylinder group S without interference, except by the manual throttle 3|. Under these conditions, the spring 40 closes the valve 41 to out 01f the flow of fuel to the carburetor I5, and the upper end of the cylinder 53 is filled with gasoline withdrawn from the float chamber I8 and the nozzle 42.

When the manual throttle 3| is opened wider, or when the engine speed is decreased sufficiently to cause a reduction of the intake manifold vacuum below the point at which the spring 66 is calibrated, this spring overcomes the vacuum and starts to move the piston 55 upwardly with respect to Figures 1 and 2. The first upward movement of the piston carries the valve M upwardly, first, by reason of the fact that the suction acts against the valve to pull it open, and, secondly, by reason of the fact that the spring member I6 makes a frictional sliding fit between the stem 68 and the valve I4. This opening of the valve causes the admission of some atmospheric-air, through the. calibratedpassage; Isa which has the effect of partially killl ggthe. SUI-Cr.

tionapplied through the restricted; passageway 99. the piston 541s started; the resisting ,suction' is automatically furtherdecreased sothat the -full stroke of ;the piston '54 will be completed when it has oncebeen started.-

The upward strokeof the piston 54-causes the.

opening of the valve 41 by the-push rod which isactuated by the spring 49, it beingnoted that while the spring 49 isstronger than spring 48, it-isvery weak with respectto the spring 66, the latter. beingprecompressed-to such an extent as to. minimize the change in pressure of the. spring during the. stroke of the piston 54..

Theupwardstroke of-thewpiston-not only opens the valve ll, but also causesthe valve. 63 to bev lifted from itsseat to .permit a. flow of fuel from the cylinder 53 to initiate the flow through the nozzle-Gland wet the intake manifoldl3. This sets the. auxiliary. group ofcylinders in operation.

Assoon as the. valve l4..is opened, the suction from the. passageway, 12 .iscommunicated, to the conduit. H, so. that the pressure on opposite sides of the. piston 8.6 in the. cylinder 88 is balanced. As long as the pressure isv balanced, the spring 3? is free. to move the piston 86'to the position shown in Figure 1, thereby closing. the valves 19 and lea, it being noted that these valves do not fully close the-passageways, but that the valve 19, permits sufiicient air flow to. ,bringthe. nozzle 41 into operation while the valve 19a cuts down the flow through manifold [4 to. such an extent that the combined flow through. passages l3 and i l with the valves 79 and lea in the position shownin Figure 1 is about the same as the previous flow through the passage I4 with the valve 19a in open position. For this reason, there is no great surge of power due tothe setting invoperationof the auxiliary cylinder group. It will be understood, of course, that the closing action of the valves l9and 79a may be limited as much as desired by the particular operator,

As is, well understood. by those skilled in the art, a vacuum of '7" of mercury is not. likely to be. maintained in the manifold M withthe valve 3| in not much more than half open position. With this in mind, the lost. motion slot 95 connected to the valve 3! does not begin to pick up the valve 19a until thevalve 3! is half-way open or more. However, if the operator desires full power, he will open the throttle beyond the half open position, thus picking up the valves 79 and 19a and carrying them to full open position which they reach at the same timethe valve 35 becomes fully opened. This is by reason of the greater operating leverage of leverv 93 as compared with lever 83, as well as themore favorable angular position of the pivot. 95 with respect to the pivot 91.

With the engine operatingon all cylinders and the air bleed I90 acting. to partially kill the suction transferred from the manifold l2 to the cylinders 53 and 88, the piston 54. will remain in upward positionuntil the vacuum in manifold IZreaches 12" or of. mercury,' according to the desired setting. However, when such vacuum is reached, piston Edstartsto withdraw-against the spring 56 and-immediately closes the valve 14 against the seat 13,- cutting off the suction from the inner end of cylinder 88 so that atmospheric. pressure from the vent I93 is effective againstthe inner end of the piston and the suction immediately shifts the piston 8fi-totheright Thus, theinstant theupwardjmovement ofith; spect to; re th re y u y enin the valves 9 and 1 4 1 As soon as the valve-,Hi closed the ventlfld ceases to be effective ;to;bleedout thesuction ap extra .fuel down through the; jet {52. v The: first partofthe flow o f= this fuel is very fast fc; r -t l 1 e rposeo na he e om-. he.-n .z le 2; but assoon as the .pistoni l has withdrawniar; enough to-allow; the .seatingoithe; 63, the move: ment is accomplished muchmore: slow-1y asrthevalve 41'is.;sti11. 0pei1,- and-it is desiredtoreturn thepiston only as; fast as fuel can flow-down throughthe jet 52.; otherwise, the cylinder 53 of the snatcher pumpwould merely-suck in a; little-fuel and a lotof-air, so that there would not be enough fuel to wet the manifoldinstantly when-the valve is againopened. It will be understood that the piston 54-makes a ful1str0kein either; direction whenever-it starts, but that thereis a-very substantial. overlap so that the engine. does. not continually hunt-back :and ;forth between four cylindersand eight.

With respect to .the back-fire, switch; it -,will be noted that the terminals Band l M are normally connected byumeans ofthe-member, |06.-which-is insliding contactwithterminal I04 and held in contact with-the member. I05: by means of the spring Ill], exceptwhenexcessive suction i$--d e-. velopedin cylinder: 98..due to the engine...being driven at a, speedhigher, than. idlingwhile, the throttle 3|. is in closed-position. During-normal idling, apartof the suction appliedthrough the opening i I12. to the. 1 piston I011. is, transferred. to the other. end of the cylinder by reason of the leakage at 99,. so thatthespring. In! is. quite effective. in holdin the ignition circuit closed during normal idling. However, an excessiveincrease of suction above the. normal. idlingsuction breaks the-piston lollaway from the opening H0 which permits. atmospheric pressure to enterthe outer end of .the cylinder, sothatthgfullefiect of the suctionfromthe portlllZ. can act, on thespring I Bl- This may be termed a slight overlap action nd makes. it muc ea ier to av id a a ed edge adjustment which will hold for steady idling and yet break quickenough to stop theback-fire on deceleration.

The exclusive use of all modifications. as. come within the scppe of thelapnended claimsiscone templated;

I claim:

1, In a.,control devic e for internal combustion engines of the type. having main and auxiliary cylinder groups, meansforming mainand auxiliary. wnduits for saidgrou-ps, a thr tle valve or a dmai m xtur v co duit. and a damper valve anda. fuel valve for saidjauxiliary com duit, means for holding said damper valve inopen position when said fuel valve cuts oil the fuel supplyto said auxiliarymixing conduit,

2. In acontrol'device for internal combustion engines of the type having main and auxiliary cylinder groups, means forming main and-aux iliary mixing conduit for said groups, a throttle valvefor said mainmixture conduit; a damper valve and afuel'valvefor saidauxiliary conduit, means for holdingsaid damper valve in open position when said ,fuel valve cutsofi' the fuel'supply o a auxi iary -m 2 ipg;c0nd it, and ea s for los n a d. damp r. valve when. said. fuel... valve isopened.

3. In a control device for internal combustion engines of the type having main and auxiliary cylinder groups, means forming main and auxiliary mixing conduits for said groups, a throttle valve for said main mixture conduit, a damper valve and a fuel valve for said auxiliary conduit, means for holding said damper valve in open position when said fuel valve cuts off the fuel supply to said auxiliary mixing conduit, and

means for moving said damper valve to open position when the main throttle is moved to fully open position.

4. In a control device for internal combustion engines of the type having main and auxiliary cylinder groups, main and auxiliary fuel supply conduits for said groups, a manually operated main throttle for said main conduit, a damper valve and a fuel valve for said auxiliary'conduit, means responsive to the opening of said manual throttle for opening said auxiliary fuel valve and closing said damper valve, and means operated by said main throttle for limiting the closing movement of said damper valve.

5. In a control device for internal combustion engines of the type having main and auxiliary cylinder groups, main and auxiliary fuel supply conduits for said groups, a manually operated main throttle for said main conduit, a damper valve and a fuel valve for said auxiliary conduit, means responsive to the opening of said manual throttle for opening said auxiliary fuel valve and closing said damper valve, and means operated by said main throttle for limiting the closing movement of said damper valve, said last named means comprising a lost motion connection constructed and arranged to take eiTect only after said main throttle valve has been opened to a pre determined extent.

6. In a control device for internal combustion engines of the type having main and auxiliary cylinder groups, main and auxiliary fuel supply conduits for said groups, a manually operated main throttle for said main conduit, a damper valve and a fuel valve for said auxiliary conduit, means responsive to the opening of said manual throttle for opening said auxiliary fuel valve and closing said damper valve, and means operated by said main throttle for limiting the closing movement of said damper valve, said lost motion connection comprising a comparatively long lever connected to said throttle, a comparatively short lever connected to said damper valve, and a slotted link connecting said levers.

7. In a control device for internal combustion engines of the type having main and auxiliary cylinder groups, main and auxiliary mixing conduits for said groups, a main throttle for said main mixing conduit, a fuel valve and a damper valve for said auxiliary mixing conduit, and means tending to close said damper valve and for restricting said main mixing conduit when said fuel valve is opened.

8. In a control device for internal combustion engines of the type having main and auxiliary cylinder groups, main and auxiliary mixing conduits for said groups, a main throttle for said main mixing conduit, a fuel valve and a damper valve for said auxiliary mixing conduit, means tending to close said damper valve and for re" stricting said main mixing conduit when said fuel valve is opened, and means operated by a full opening movement of said main throttle for eliminating said restriction and opening said damper valve.

9. In a carburetor, means forming a mixing;

conduit, a source of fuel supply, a fuel nozzle receiving fuel from said source and discharging into said mixing conduit, a valve for said nozzle, an expansible chamber having a movable wall responsive to suction, means for limiting the opening and closing movements of said fuel valve, and a lost motion connection between said movable wall and said valve including an operating rod having a resilient end portion for abutting said wall, said end portion being constructed and arranged to permit .continued movement of, said movable wall after said valve has reached the limits of its movement.

10. In a carburetor, means forming a mixing conduit, a source of fuel supply, a fuel nozzle receiving fuel from said'source and discharging into said mixing conduit, a valve for said nozzle, an expansible chamber having a, movable wall responsive to suction, means for limiting the opening and closing movements of said fuel valve, and a lost motion connection between said movable wall and said valve including an operating member having a telescoping end portion for abutting said wall and normally urged to extended position and capable of collapsing when the valve has reached the limit of its opening movement.

11. In an internal combustion engine having at least two groups of cylinders and mixture conduits, respectively, supplying said groups, a manual throttle in one of said conduits, and a pressure operated throttle in each of said conduits.

12. In an internal combustion engine having at least two groups of cylinders and mixture conduits, respectively, supplying said groups, a manual throttle in one of said conduits, a pressure operated throttle in each of said conduits, and a lost motion connection between said manual throttle and said pressure throttle to enforce opening of the latter responsive to substantial opening of the former.

13. In a control device for internal combustion engines of the type having main and auxiliary cylinder groups, main and auxiliary fuel mixture conduits for said cylinder groups, a manually operated throttle valve for sai main mixture conduit, a damper valve for said auxiliary conduit, and means responsive to the opening movement of said throttle valve beyond a predetermined position for closing said damper valve.

14. In a control device for internal combustion engines of the type having main and auxiliary cylinder groups, main and auxiliary fuel mixture conduits for said cylinder groups, a manually operated throttle valve for said main mixture conduit, a damper valve for said auxiliary conduit, means responsive to the openin movement of said throttle valve beyond a predetermined position for closing said damper valve, and means for limiting the closing movement of said damper valve.

1-5. A control device for internal combustion engines of the type composed of main and auxiliary cylinder groups and main and auxiliary fuel supply conduits for said groups, comprising a manually operated throttle for said main conduit, a fuel valve for said auxiliary conduit, an i nition ystem connected to said cylinder groups, and means for disconnecting said ignition system when said throttle and fuel valves are closed and the suction posterior to said throttle valve increases a predetermined amount above normal idling suction.

16. A control device for internal combustion engines of the type composed of main and auxiliary cylinder groups and main and auxiliary fuel 11 supply conduits for said groups, comprising a manually operated throttle for-said main conduit, a fuel valve for saidiauxiliarysconduitran ignition-system connected'to said cylinderzgroups,

} means for disconnecting :said ignition system When said throttleand fuel valves arezclosediand the suction posterior .to said throttle Valve. increase a predetermined .amount'vabove normal idling suction, and means for'reconnecting said ignition system to said cylinder groups when normal idling suction is restored.

'17. .In a control device forninternal combustion engines of the type having main :and zauxiliary cylinder groups and fuelmixture 'conduits for said groups, a manually "operated throttlevalve for said mainmixture conduit, a.fuelv;cut-ofi :valve'for said auxiliary conduit, an ignition system for said cylinder groups, and switch means for disconnectingisaid system from said cylinders when suction in said main conduit posterior to said throttle valve is raised .above'normal idling suction.

18. In a control'deviceior internal combustion engines of the type composed of main and'auxiliary cylinder groups: and main ;and-: auxiliary fuel .mixture -conduits for said groups, a. manually @operated throttle valve :for said main mixture conduit, a fuel valve for said auxiliary-conduit,

an ignition system. for saidengine, .andisuction "responsive, switch means for disconnecting said ignition :system during periods of abnormally high suction in said main mixture conduit.

GEORGE i R. ERICSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of-record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES. PATENTS Winkler 'Sept. 7, 1943

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2615440 *Dec 30, 1947Oct 28, 1952Bendix Aviat CorpCarburetor
US2623617 *Dec 16, 1949Dec 30, 1952Carter Carburetor CorpHalf motor cutout
US4132199 *Jul 11, 1977Jan 2, 1979Hitachi, Ltd.Air-fuel ratio control apparatus
US7419042Oct 15, 2004Sep 2, 2008Asahi Seiko Kabushiki KaishaAutomatic coin aligning apparatus and method
US7429213Jun 29, 2007Sep 30, 2008Asahi Seiko Kabushiki KaishaAutomatic coin aligning apparatus and method
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Classifications
U.S. Classification123/579, 123/583, 261/23.2
International ClassificationF02D17/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02D2700/056, F02D17/00
European ClassificationF02D17/00