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Publication numberUS2424418 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 22, 1947
Filing dateAug 2, 1945
Priority dateAug 2, 1945
Publication numberUS 2424418 A, US 2424418A, US-A-2424418, US2424418 A, US2424418A
InventorsRobert Rory
Original AssigneeRobert Rory
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metallizing machine
US 2424418 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 22, 1947. R. RORY METALLIZING MACHINE Filed Aug. 2, 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 22, 194'? UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE METALLIZIN G MACHINE Robert Rory, East Greenwich, R. I. Application August 2, 1945, Serial No. 608,587

13 Claims.

This invention relates to machines for treating orbitally moving bodies and is illustrated herein as embodied in a machine for applying a metal coating to a body by an operation known as metallizing.

This metallizing operation is commonly carried out by the use of a tool which projects a jet of molten comminuted metal on to the surface of a body to be coated. The usual type of such a tool comprises an oxy-acetylene torch through the center of which is fed a wire of the kind of material desired for the coating. Furthermore, in the nozzle of the tool there is a series of orifices, surrounding those through which the combustible gases are emitted, for supplyin an air blast which envelopes the flame in which the wire is melted. Thus, a jet or spray of molten particles of metal is continuously emitted by the tool and the particles will adhere to a body which is held in the hot part of the jet.

One useful application of this metallizing operation is in the repairing of worn bearings which may be effected by applying thin coats of metal to bearings and then refinishing them to the proper size as by grinding or lapping.

It is apparent that in the use of a metallizing tool, the surface to be coated and the tool must be moved relatively to each other uniformly, in order to avoid having irregularities in the thickness of the coating which would make the refinishing diflicult because of the hardness of the metal employed. In repairing the bearings of a crank shaft, for example, a coating may be uniformly applied to a main bearing, without undue difficulty, by holding a metallizing tool adjacent to the bearings while a crank shaft is rotated on its axis between a pair of centers.

However, it is impracticable, when the metallizing tool is manually controlled or directed, for an operator to follow the orbital movement of the connecting rod bearings for the following reasons. It is difiicult to maintain a uniform distance between the tool and the bearing. It is also difficult for the operator to maintain a uniform lateral movement of the tool along the bearing. Moreover, the tool is likely to be struck by other parts of the crank shaft adjacent to the bearing being coated, and the operator is endangered by the heat, fumes, and molten metal, as well as by his proximity to the rotating crank shaft.

In view of the foregoing, it is a principal object of this invention to provide a machine for uniformly treating orbitally moving objects, as

by applying heat, or a coating of metal or other substance thereto.

A further object of this invention is to reduce the time and cost of refinishing crank shaft bearings.

A further object of this invention is to relieve the operator of a metallizing machine from the hazards usually accompanying a metallizing operation and from having to follow with a metallizing tool the orbital rotation of a body which is to be refinished by the use of the tool.

Accordingly, the present invention provides a machine for performing a metallizing operation on, or otherwise treating an orbitally moving body, in which a jet-emitting tool is moved, as by simultaneous sliding and swinging, so that the jet is directed continuously at the body as it rotates, and the distance between the tool and body is maintained constant.

With the above and other objects and features in view, the invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings which illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention and will be pointed out in the claims.

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view showing a lathe which has been adapted, in accordance with the invention, for metallizing the bearings of a crank shaft.

Fig, 2 is a plan view Fig. 1,.

Fig. 3 is a partial end elevational view of the machine as viewed from the right-hand end of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged end view, with parts broken away and in section, showing a part of the mechanism for sliding and swinging the projector mount.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged sectional view, the section being taken along the line VV in Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged end view with parts broken away and in section showing a part of the mechanism for moving the projector laterally and also ShOWiIlg details of the means for sliding and swinging the projector mount.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged sectional view, the section being taken along the line VII-VII in Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is an enlarged view, partly in section, of the guide for one of the projector supports.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged detailed view, mainly in section, of the mechanism for driving the projector support, the section being taken along the line IXIX in Fig. 2.

Referring to the drawings, the invention is illustrated herein as embodied in a conventional of a machine illustrated in lathe having a bed I (Figs. 1 and 2) on the ways 2 of which a headstock 3 and tailstock 4 are mounted in the usual way. A spindle 5 is rotatably mounted in the headstock and carries a pulley 6 which is driven by a belt 1.

Attached to a face plate 8, threaded on the spindle 5, is a crank unit 9 having a center i!) mounted thereon coaxially with the spindle. A crank shaft ll to be repaired is centered in the lathe between the center in and another center Illa associated with the tailstock,

A coating of metal can be sprayed on any connecting rod bearing of the crankshaft by means of a metallizing tool [2, which is movable relatively to a support l3, axially of the lathe opposite to any bearing on the crankshaft, and also to insure evenness in the coating applied to any particular bearing. The support I3 is simultaneously oscillated in a vertical plane and reciprocated horizontally by a mechanism driven by the above-mentioned crank unit 9. Accordingly, similar oscillating and reciprocating movements are imparted to the tool l2 whereby it is always directed at, and is maintained at a constant distance from, the bearing which is being treated.

As will be more fully explained below, a parallel motion mechanism including a cable M is arranged positively to move the right-hand end of the support 113 towards the axis of the lathe with the same rate of movement as that of its lefthand end in the same direction. This mechanism also comprises a weight [5 which moves the right-hand end of the support l3 in the opposite direction always keeping the cable it taut, whereby parallelism of all the positions of the support is maintained. Thus, regardless of the position of the metallizing tool 12 lengthwise of the crankshaft H, the relative movement between the crankshaft and the tool will always be the same.

The mechanism referred to above generally will noW be described in greater detail.

The crank unit 9 comprises a pair of discs I6 and I! which are held apart in spaced coaxial relation by a crank pin l8 (Fig. 5). The discs l6 and l! are provided with elongated radially disposed slots 19 and 20 respectively (Figs. 5 and 7), adapted to receive a bolt 2| which passes through the center of the crank pin l8, and which is adapted to hold the discs and crank pin in assembled relation. The crank unit 9 is attached to the face plate 8 by screws 22 which are threaded into the disc IS. The center [0 is mounted in the disc I! coaxially therewith.

The construction of the crank unit 9 makes provision for adjusting the throw of the crank pin 18, radially of the unit, without disturbing the coaxial relation of the center [0 to the spindle 5, whereby the reciprocating and oscillating movement of the tool l2 can be varied in accordance with connecting rod bearings having varying throws. To this end, the inner faces of the discs I!) and H are provided with parallel radial slots 23 and 24 in which bushings 26 and 21 respectively are arranged to slide. The bushings are bored to receive the ends of the crank pin l8, and hence hold the latter in alignment with the axes of theslots 23 and 24. Plates 28 and 29 are arranged slidably to hold the bushings 26 and 21 assembled with respect to the discs [6 and H respectively. A series of graduations, as indicated at 30 in Fig. 6, on the inner sides of both discs l6 and I1, and extending across their peripheries enable the operator, in adjusting the throw of the crank pin l3, to insure that the disc H and hence the center in will always be 00- axial with spindle 5. This relation is established by observing what graduation on the disc 16 is opposite to a reference point on the bushing 26, and then adjusting the disc i? so that the corresponding graduation on it is opposite to a similar reference point on the bushing 21. When, after the throw of the crank pin l8 has been changed, this relation has been established, and the graduations on the peripheries of the discs are aligned, the bolt 2| is firmly tightened.

The crank unit 9 is connected with the support l3 by mechanism including a connecting rod 32 and a sliding linkage 33 (Fig. 2), details of which are shown in Figs. 4 and 9.

The linkage 33 comprises a sliding block 34, a swinging arm 35, a pivot pin 36, and a guide 31.

The guide 31 is securely attached to the bed I by bolts 38 as clearly shown in Fig. 4. The guide supports the block 34 for movement in a horizontal line. The guide 31 is equipped with arms 39 which fit in rectangular slots in the sides of the block 34.

The upper portion of the block 34 is bifurcated to form a pair of jaws -32 between which the lower portion of the arm 35 fits (Fig. 9). The pivot pin 35 is fixed to the arm 35 by a set-screw 40 and is journaled in openings drilled through the jaws 32. The connecting rod 32 connects the crank unit 9 with the arm 35. Accordingly, the arm 35 moves horizontally with the block and simultaneously swings about the axis of the pivot pin when the crank unit rotates.

The connecting rod 32 has a head 44 (Fig. 5) which fits freely between the plates 23 and 23 and is rotatably mounted on the crank pin H3. The other end of the connecting rod passes through an opening drilled through the upper portion of the arm 35 (Fig. 9) and is held in adjusted position therein by a set screw 45.

A series of graduations, as indicated at 46 in Figs. 2 and 5, on the upper surface of the connecting rod 32, enable the operator quickly to adjust the effective length of the connecting rod in accordance with different sizes of work and vary the angle through which the arm 35 swings,

The support I3 is a flat bar of rectangular cross section which is parallel to and almost as long as the bed I and slides toward and away from the bed with the linkage 33 (Figs. 1 and 2). The left hand end of the support #3 is attached to the pivot pin 36 and swings and slides therewith. The right hand end of the support (3 is moved with the same motion by the above-mentioned parallel motion mechanism which later will be described in detail. Hence, the support 13 is maintained parallel to the bed I throughout all stages in its operation and simultaneously swings and slides with the arm 35.

The metallizing tool I2 is carried by and is movable lengthwise of the support I3 (Fig. 2). The tool I2 also moves horizontally and swings with the support 13 and the arm 35.

The metallizing tool 12 comprises a jet projector 18 (Fig. 6) and a rest 49 upon which the projector is mounted. The projector 48 is of conventional design and projects a jet of molten comminuted metal through a nozzle 53. Heating and blast gases are fed into the projector through inlet tubes 5i. Only the end portions of the inlet tubes 5! adjacent to the jet projector are shown. The rest 49 has a slot 52 which slidably receives the support l3. The projector 48 is attached to the rest 49 and is adjustable thereon toward or away from the bed I to vary the distance between the projector and work carried on the lathe as shown in Fig. 6.

The metallizing tool I2 is drivenlaterally along the bed I by a guide 53. The guide 53 comprises a pair of bars which are attached firmly to a tool carriage 54 (Figs. 1 and 2). The carriage is of conventional design and can be moved along the bed I by turning a crank 55. A tongue 56 (Fig. 6) extending downwardly from the rest 41 fits between the bars of the guide 53. The metallizing tool is moved along the bed of the lathe and along the crank shaft I l or other .work mounted thereon by turning the crank 55 and moving the tool carriage along the bed of the lathe. Uniform movement of the tool along a crank shaft bearing can be had by movin the tool carriage until the gun is opposite to the bearing to be repaired and then turning the crank 55 at a uniform speed.

An equalizer support 51 (Fig. 2) sustains the support I3 between its ends and prevents it from sagging under the weight of the metallizing tool 12. The details of the equalizer support 51 are shown in Fig. 8. It comprises an equalizer disc 58, having a grooved periphery adapted to receive a runway 59, in which the disc freely rotates and slides crosswise of the bed I. The runway 59 is firmly fixed to the tool carriage 54 and hence the equalizer support 51 moves along the bed I of the lathe with the tool carriage. A slot 62 in the disc slidably receives the support I3. As the support I3 slides and swings, the disc slides and revolves inside the runway.

The right-hand end of the support I3 is driven by a parallel motion mechanism which causes the right-hand end of the support I3 to describe the same motion as that of the left-hand end. The parallel motion mechanism comprises a sliding yoke 64 (Fig. an equalizer disc 65, cables I4 and 66, the weight I5, idler pulleys 61, 6B, and 69 (Fig. 2), a driving pulley H, and a driving rod 12.

The driving rod 12 of the sliding block across the bed I of slides in and out.

One end of the cable I4 ing rod 12 by an eyebolt I4 leads from the eyebolt 1|, 69, and 68 to the yoke tached to the inner side of the yoke. The pulley 1| (Fig. 2) is mounted on the rear end of the driving rod 12 and reciprocates therewith. The pulley 69 is mounted on the rear portion of the guide 31 (Figs. 2 and 4) The pulley 68 is mounted on a. clamp 14 (Fig. 3) which is attached to the rear portion of the ways near the right-hand end thereof. The effective length of the cable I4 can be controlled by adjusting the eyebolt 13 lengthwise of the rod 12.

One end of the cable 66 is attached to the side of the yoke 64 away from the bed of the lathe. The cable 66 passes over the idler pulley 61, and the free end of cable 66 is attached to the weight I5. The weight I keeps the cables I4 and 66 taut at all times, and provides the force for moving the right-hand end of the support I3 during its outward movement.

The yoke 64 is mounted to slide on a rail 15 which is attached tothe forward portion of the avays 2 by a clamp 11. The pulley 61 is rotatably nounted 0n the outer end of the rail 15.

The equalizer disc 65 has a grooved periphery tdapted to receive the sides of the yoke 64 and as a slot 18 through which the right-hand end if the support I 3 passes as shown in Fig. 3.

is fixed to the lower portion 34 (Fig. 4) and reciprocates the lathe when the block 34 is attached to the driv- 13 (Fig. 2). The cable 13 around the pulleys 64 (Fig. 3), and is atin the manner already The sliding linkage 33, the equalizer support 51, and the sliding yoke 64 (Fig. 2) fo m spaced crossheads in which the support I3 is rotatably mounted.

When the machine is to be used, the crankshaft II (Fig. 2) to be repaired is mounted between the centers I 0 and Illa. The crankshaft is turned until the connecting rod bearing 19 to be metallized is parallel to the slots I9 and 20. The crankshaft I I is then positioned angularly and in driving relation to the crank unit 9 by the use of a dog 82.

The tool carriage 54 is moved along the bed I of the lathe by rotating the crank 55 until the gun. I2 is opposite to the connecting rod bearing 19.

This adto reciprocate with of the orbit through Second, the crankbearing 19 is horithe angle through which the projector swings is the same as the angle sub-tended by the orbital bearing, and the jet is continuthe center of the bearing, and the distance between the projector and the bearing will be maintained constant notwithstanding the orbital movement of the bearing.

With the aid of this invention, it is simple to produce a uniform coating of metal on the (bearing 19 (Figs. 1 and 2). The machine is adjusted described. The crank 55 is turned until the projector 48 is opposite to one end of the bearing. The lathe is operated by supplying power to the pulley 6. Then the projector 48 is set into operation and a jet of molten comminuted metal is applied to the hearing. The crank 55 is turned at operator to drive the projector along thebearing and a uniform coating of metal is applied to the bearing.

The machine is readily adaptable for treating connecting rod bearings having different throws, since only the simple adjustments already described need be made to accommodate crankshafts of difierent types. v

This invention has been described with reference to metallizing a connecting rod bearing of a crankshaft. However, it can be adapted easily for other operations such as painting orheat treating orbitally rotating objects. In addition, its use need not be limited to treating crankshaft bearings, for it is readily adaptable to treating other types of bodies which may rotate in an orbit.

Having described my invention what I claim as novel and desire to protect by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. In a machine for applying a metal coating to a body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector adapted to produce a jet of molten comminuted metal, said projector being mounted to reciprocate and oscillate, means for reciprocating said projector with a stroke equal to the diameter of said orbit, and means for oscillating said projector through an angle subtended by said orbit, whereby the relation between said body and the jet is continuously maintained.

2. In a machine for applying a metal coating to a body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector adapted to produce a jet of molten comminuted metal, said projector bein mounted to swing and slide, means for swinging said projector to cause the center of said jet to be directed continuously at the center of said body, and means for sliding said projector to maintain a constant distance between said projector and body.

3. In a machine for projecting a jet upon a body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector, a support, said projector being adjustable along said support lengthwise of the axis of said orbit, spaced crossheads in which said support is rotatably mounted, and means for imparting the Same movement to said crossheads toward and away from said body whereby said support is moved parallel to itself, said means also being constructed and arranged to swing said support thru an angle subtended by said orbit whereby said jet. projector is continuously directed at said body.

4. In a machine for projecting a jet upon a body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector, a support, said projector being adjustable along said support lengthwise of the axis of said orbit, spaced crossheads in which said support is rotatably mounted, means for reciprocating one crosshead and simultaneously swinging said support, and connections comprising a cable actuated by the reciprocation of said last mentioned crosshead for imparting the same reciprocation to the other crosshead.

5. In a machine for projecting a jet upon a body rotating upon an orbit, a jet projector, a support, said projector being adjustable along said support lengthwise of the axis of said orbit, spaced crossheads in which said support is rotatably mounted, means for reciprocating one crosshead and simultaneously swinging said support, and connections comprising a cable actuated by the reciprocation or said last mentioned crosshead for imparting the same reciprocation to the a uniform speed by the 8 other crosshead and means for maintaining said cable taut at all times.

-6. In a machine for applying a metal coating to a body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector, a support for said projector, said support bein mounted to slide parallel to itself and to the axis of the work to maintain a constant distance between said projector and the body, and means for swinging and sliding said support to cause said projector to be directed continuously toward the body, said means comprising a rocker arm, a connecting rod, and a crank for driving said rod, said crank being adjustable to vary its throw.

'7. In a machine for treating a body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector, a support for said projector, said support being mounted to slide and swing, and means for simultaneously swinging and sliding said support whereby the jet emitted by said projector is directed continuously at the body and the distance between said projector and the body is maintained constant, said means comprising a connecting rod and a crank unit, said crank unit comprising a pair of coaxially mounted discs, a center mounted on one of said discs, and a crank pin connecting said discs, said crank pin being adjustable radially of said discs.

8. In a machine for treating a body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector, a support for said projector, said support being mounted to slide and swing, and means for simultaneously swings and sliding said support whereby the jet emitted by said projector is directed continuously at the body and the distance between said projector and the body is maintained constant, said means comprising a connecting rod and a crank unit, said crank unit comprising a pair of discs having radially disposed slots, a crank pin carrying said connecting rod and separating said discs, bushings slidably mounted in said slots and arranged to receive the ends of said crank pin, and means for holding said discs, bushings, and crank pin in assembled relation.

9. In a machine for projecting a jet upon a body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector, a support, said projector being adjustable along said support lengthwise of the axis of said orbit, a first means in which said support is rotatably mounted, and a second means for imparting movement to said first means toward and away from said body whereby said support is moved parallel to itself, said second means also being constructed and arranged to swing said support through an angle subtended by said orbit whereby said jet projector is continuously directed at said body.

10. In a machine ior projecting a jet upon a body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector, a support, said projector being adjustable along said support lengthwise of the axis of said orbit, spaced crossheads in which said support is rotatably mounted, means for reciprocating one crosshead and simultaneously swinging said support, and means actuated by the reciprocation of said last-mentioned crosshead for imparting the same reciprocation to the other crosshead.

11. In a machine for projecting a jet upon 2 body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector, a support, said projector being adjustable along saic support lengthwise of the axis of said orbit spaced crossheads in which said support is rotat ably mounted, means for reciprocating one cross head and simultaneously swinging said support said means comprising a connecting rod an crank unit, said crank unit comprising a pair 0 coaxially mounted discs, a center mounted o1 one of said discs, and a, crank pin connecting said discs, said crank pin being adjustable radially of said discs, and means actuated by the reciprocation of said last-mentioned crosshead for imparting the same reciprocation to the other crosshead.

12. An attachment for a lathe adapted to project a jet upon a body rotating in an orbit between the centers of said lathe, a, jet projector, a support, the tool carriage of said lathe being adapted to adjustably position said projector along said support lengthwise of the axis of said orbit, spaced crossheads in which said support is rotatably mounted, members secured to the bed of said lathe adapted to support said crossheads, means associated with the face-plate of said lathe for reciprocating one crosshead and simultaneously swinging said support, and connections comprising a cable and pulley means mounted on said lathe and actuated by the reciprocation of said last-mentioned crosshead for imparting the same reciprocation to the other crosshead.

13. In a machine for projecting a jet upon a body rotating in an orbit, a jet projector, a support, said projector being adjustable along said support lengthlwise of the axis of said orbit,

10 spaced crossheads in which said support is rotatably mounted, means for reciprocating one crosshead and simultaneously swinging said support, said means comprising a rocker arm, a connecting rod, and an adjustable crank for driving said rod, and connections comprising a cable actuated by the reciprocation of said last-mentioned crosshead for imparting the same reciprocation to the other crosshead.

ROBERT RORY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,083,633 Brackett June 15, 1937 2,345,834 Schweitzer April 4, 1944 2,271,442 Sanborn June 27, 1942 2,373,604 Schweitzer Apr. 10, 1945 2,316,959 Hinkley et a1 Apr. 20, 1945 1,889,676 Little Nov. 29, 1932 2,330,880 Gladfelter et al. Oct. 5, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1889676 *Jul 5, 1929Nov 29, 1932Earl W LittlePaint applying machine
US2083633 *Apr 6, 1935Jun 15, 1937Gen Motors CorpPaint spraying machine
US2271442 *Sep 26, 1940Jan 27, 1942Binks Mfg CoAutomatic spraying machine for spraying traveling articles
US2316959 *May 17, 1939Apr 20, 1943Corning Glass WorksApparatus for coating articles
US2330880 *Jul 16, 1940Oct 5, 1943Crown Cork & Seal CoCoating machine
US2345834 *Oct 1, 1941Apr 4, 1944Schweitzer Howard VPainting machine
US2373604 *Sep 7, 1939Apr 10, 1945Schweitzer Howard VPainting machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2598246 *Nov 4, 1949May 27, 1952Carrier Engineering Co LtdApparatus for painting motorcar bodies
US2854732 *Mar 11, 1952Oct 7, 1958British Iron Steel ResearchProcess for the production of metals
US2876732 *Jan 11, 1955Mar 10, 1959Dewrance & CoApparatus for depositing an annular metal coating upon a work-piece
US4099481 *Sep 30, 1976Jul 11, 1978Eutectic CorporationApparatus for applying metal coatings to a metal substrate
DE3043830A1 *Nov 20, 1980Jun 4, 1981Electro Plasma IncVerfahren zum lichtbogen-plasma-beschichten und system zu seiner durchfuehrung
DE3043830C3 *Nov 20, 1980Feb 26, 1998Electro Plasma IncLichtbogen-Plasma-Beschichtungssystem
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/321, 82/106, 29/6.1, 82/15
International ClassificationB23K5/18, B23K5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB23K5/18
European ClassificationB23K5/18