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Publication numberUS2424609 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 29, 1947
Filing dateJan 4, 1946
Priority dateJan 4, 1946
Publication numberUS 2424609 A, US 2424609A, US-A-2424609, US2424609 A, US2424609A
InventorsJr Martin Friedmann
Original AssigneeJr Martin Friedmann
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Footwear
US 2424609 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Ju ly 29, 1947. I M. FRIEDMANNLJR I 2,424,609

FOOTWEAR Filed Jan. 4;, 1946 '2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 29, 1947 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,424,609. FOOTWEAR; Martin Friedmann, Jr., Norfolk, Va.

Application January 4, 1946-, Serial No. 638,931

8-Claims. 1

This invention. relates to footwear, and more particularly to shoes for women.

A primary object of. this invention is theprovision of an improved shoe for women characterized by the appearance of a conventional highheeled shoe, and further characterized. by in.- creased strength, resiliency, and comfort.

Av further object of the invention is the pro.- vision of such a shoe characterized by av rearwardly extending portion of the sole thereofi which affords a relatively large supporting surface substantially reducing wear on the sole thereof.

A still .further ob jectoof the invention isnthe provision of such a shoe characterized by the omission of the conventional heel portion and the consequent wear incident thereto.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of an improved shoe of this character provided with means whereby flexibility of. the toe portion thereofiis permitted.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of such ashoe which will be sturdy and durable in construction and relatively inexpensive to manufacture and assemble.

Other objects will in part be obviousv and in part be pointed out as the description of'the inventionproceeds and-shown in the accompanying drawing wherein there is disclosed a pre-- ferred. embodiment of this inventive concept.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of one form of shoe embodying features of the instant inventive concept.

Figure 2 is a top plan View of the shoe dis1- closed in Figure 1.

Figures 3, l, 5, 6 and '7 are sectional views taken substantially along the appropriate section lines of Figure 1.

Figure. 8 is a side elevational View of a'modified, form of construction.

Figure 9 is a bottom plan view of the construction shown in Figure 8, certain portions thereof being broken away.

Figure 10 is an enlarged detail view of the sole construction, the-upper portion of the shoe being removed.

Figure 11 is a. fragmentary sectionalview taken substantially along the longitudinal center line of the shoe at the juncture of the sole and supporting surface therefor.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawmg.

Having reference now to the drawingthe shoe of the instant invention is comprised of a resilientmetallic plate generally indicated at l0 and comprising a .sole .portion H, a shank portion :llganda heel portion 13. The plate") is formed :inarcuate configuration to conform .to the normal configuration of the lower portion of a womans'shoe, of the high-heeled .type, and is reinforced throughout the heel and shank portions,.asibest shown in: Figures 3 andrl, by a reinforcin .strip 1:5 or arcuate configuration in cross-section, the arc tapering from a relatively sharp: curve, as shown in Figure 3, to a lesser .curve,..as indicated in Figure 4 at l6. As 'best showrrziniFigures 6aand 7, the sol portion II is provided-with anpairchamber or space 1 1, which may be filled if desired with suitable material, such as felt or the like, the lower portion of whichqi'sclosed byla metallic solemember [8. As shown in. :Figure -17, "the sole tapers to a. conventional narrowed or pointed. portion, and the entire. sole is provided with-a plastic, or other suitable outer sole Zll, as best shown in Figures 6 and .75..

portion serving as reinforcement therefor. .It

is to; be notedthat the sole 20 extends substanstiallyiithe entire lengthof the fore vsole, as well as extending ,rearwardly of the arcuate portion 'tozprovidea substantially elongated foot-supportsurface of substantially the length of the foot. The portion 12.0 terminates slightly forwardly of the-heel portion, but in effect provides a substitute for: the normal or conventional heel portion.ofr-aihigh-heeled shoe, as well as retain- ;ing :all :the artistic and ornamental effect of such a shoe. I

:Snitable heel andctoe portions of any desired ornamentaiconfiguration :are indicated at 2 d and- 2151,.1BSI1EC17W61Y, of Figures 1 and 2.

the modified form of construction disclosed Arr-Figures r 8 ato "11', inclusive, means" are provided for enhancing and increasing, the flexibility of the; toeportion of ;the shoe. In this particular construction, thedevice; is comprised of ametallic toe. portion 311.0f .relativelyiresilient material, beveled at; extremity, as at 3 Land adapted to engageithe[correspondingly beveledrportion of a ball-portion: Muterminating ,in.;a heel portion :33. naniinner sole 3 4: which. mayib e; either. of relatively resili'entmetal or of leather, as desired, is also provided. The heel and vamp portions 32 are provided with an arcuate underlying reinforcing member 35 similar to that which underlies the portions [2 and I3, and which merges into a portion 36 similar to the extending portion 20 of the previously described modification. An outer sole 31 is also provided which underlies the entire extent of the portion 36, as well as the flexible metallic sole 3!).

Suitable heel and toe portions 38 and 39, respectively, of any desired configuration may be utilized if desired.

In the modification just described, it will be seen that by virtue of the relatively flexible toe plate 39, although all the advantages of the previously described modification are embodied in this construction, a limited flexibility is permitted to the toe of the wearer which will under certain instances facilitate walking and enhance the comfort of the wearer.

From the foregoing it will now be seen that there is herein provided an ornamental shoe retaining all the advantages of the conventional high-heeled shoe, but obviating the disadvantages thereof, in that the shoe of the instant invention provides a relatively large supporting surface, as well as enhanced resiliency affording increased comfort to the feet of the wearer, which accomplishes all the objects of this invention, and others, including many advantages of great practical utility and commercial importance.

As many embodiments may be made of this inventive concept, and as many modifications may be made in the embodiment hereinbefore shown and described, it is to be understood that all matter herein is to be interpreted merely as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. In a shoe for women, the combination of a resilient metal sole, arch and heel-supporting portion of arcuate configuration and extending upwardly at the heel in the manner of a highheeled shoe, and an elongated portion having an overlying reinforcing portion of arcuate crosssectional configuration and extending rearwardly from the sole portion to a point substantially beneath the rearmost extremity of the shoe.

2. In a shoe for women, the combination of a resilient metal sole, arch and heel-supporting portion of arcuate configuration and extending upwardly at the heel in the manner of a highheeled shoe, and an elongated portion having an overlying reinforcing portion of arcuate crosssectional configuration and extending rearwardly from the sole portion to a point substantially beneath the rearmost extremity of the shoe, said elongated portion being substantially rigid and providing a substitute for the heel of said shoe.

3. In a shoe for women, the combination of a resilient metal sole, arch and sole-supporting portion of arcuate configuration and extending upwardly at the heel in the manner of a highheeled shoe, an elongated portion having an overlying reinforcing portion of arcuate cross-sectional configuration and extending rearwardly from the sole portion to a point substantially beneath the rearmost extremity of the shoe, said elongated portion being substantially rigid and providing a substitute for the heel of said shoe, and an outer sole extending entirely beneath said sole portion and said elongated portion.

4. In a shoe for women, the combination of a resilient metal sole, arch and heel-supporting portion of arcuate configuration and extending upwardly at the heel in the manner of a highheeled shoe, and an elongated portion having an overlying reinforcing portion of arcuate crosssectional configuration and extending rearwardly from the sole portion to a point substantially beneath the rearmost extremity of the shoe, said elongated portion being substantially rigid and providing a substitute for the heel of said shoe, said extending portion being comprised of metallic material.

5. In a shoe for women, the combination of a resilient metal sole, arch and heel-supporting portion of arcuate configuration and extending upwardly at the heel in the manner of a highheeled shoe, and an elongated portion extending rearwardly from the sole portion to a point substantially beneath the rearmost extremity of the shoe, said elongated portion being substantially rigid and providing a substitute for the heel of said shoe, said extending portion being comprised of metallic material, and reinforcing portions of arcuate cross-sectional configuration secured to and underlying said arch and heel portion.

6. In a shoev for women, the combination of a resilient metal sole, arch and heel-supporting portion of arcuate configuration and extending upwardly at the heel in the manner of a highheeled shoe, an elongated portion extending rearwardly from the sole portion to a point substantially beneath the rearmost extremity of the shoe, said elongated portion being substantially rigid and. providing a substitute for the heel of said shoe, said extending portion being comprised of metallic material, reinforcing portions of arcuate cross-sectional configuration secured to and underlying said arch and heel portion, and a further reinforcing portion of arcuate cross-sectional configuration carried by and overlying said elongated portion.

. 7. In a shoe for women, the combination of a resilient metal sole, an arch and heel-supporting portion of arcuate configuration extending upwardly at the heel in the manner of a highheeled shoe, an elongated portion having an overlying reinforcing portion of arcuate crosssectional configuration and extending rearwardly from and secured to the arch-supporting portion,

.to 'a point substantially beneath the rearmost extremity of the shoe, and an outer sole extend- -ing entirely beneath the extending portion, the base of the arch-supporting portion, and the sole portion.

8. In a shoe for women, the combination of a resilient metal sole, an arch and heel-supporting portion of arcuate configuration extending upwardly at the heel in the manner of a highheeled shoe, an elongated portion extending rearwardly from and secured to the arch-supporting portion, to a point substantially beneath the rear- 'most extremity of the shoe, an outer sole extending entirely beneath the extending portion, the base of the arch-supporting portion, and the sole portion, and a resilient metal toe portion having a beveled end secured to a corresponding beveled portion of said arch-supporting portion.

MARTIN FRIEDMANN, JR.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

R UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,399,543 Dack Apr. 30, 1946 D. 129,616 Gl'assie Sept. 23, 1941

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2399543 *Aug 30, 1944Apr 30, 1946John Dack Leo ThomasShoe and the like
USD129616 *Oct 1, 1940Sep 23, 1941 Design for a shoe
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2750684 *Jun 11, 1953Jun 19, 1956Albert Lyon GeorgeExtended instep shoe
US2759284 *Oct 11, 1954Aug 21, 1956Frank SantisiOrnament displaying sandal
US2767487 *Jan 28, 1955Oct 23, 1956Friedmann Jr MartinFootwear
US2958962 *Jul 2, 1958Nov 8, 1960Romeo GriffiLadies' shoes having shank support
US5195258 *Aug 12, 1991Mar 23, 1993Loader Gerald RHigh-heeled footwear
US7752775Sep 11, 2006Jul 13, 2010Lyden Robert MFootwear with removable lasting board and cleats
US7770306Aug 23, 2007Aug 10, 2010Lyden Robert MCustom article of footwear
DE1134916B *Aug 29, 1956Aug 16, 1962Martin FriedmannTrageinheit fuer Schuhe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/91, 36/40, 36/DIG.200, D02/965, 36/34.00R, 36/92
International ClassificationA43B21/30
Cooperative ClassificationY10S36/02, A43B21/30
European ClassificationA43B21/30