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Publication numberUS2424743 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 29, 1947
Filing dateMar 31, 1945
Priority dateMar 31, 1945
Publication numberUS 2424743 A, US 2424743A, US-A-2424743, US2424743 A, US2424743A
InventorsArchibald H Davis
Original AssigneeArchibald H Davis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Composite textile strand and fabric
US 2424743 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

luy 29, 1947.

A. DAvls 2,424,743

COMPOSITE y"IEIX'IILYI STRAND AND FABRIC Filed March 31, 1945 Patented July 29, 1947 v`UNITED STATES PATENT ori-ICE COMPOSITE TEXTILE STRAND AND FABRIC Archibald H. "Travis, Washington, D. c. Application March 31, 1945, Serial No. 585,879

9 Claims. (Cl. 281-82) A general object of the invention is to greatly Another object is to produce a wide variety of textile fabrics of inorganic fiber base of novel or improved industrial utility.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description.

The invention includes composite textile strands comprising one or more bers of inorganic material and an organic plastic composition covering a portion only of the surface of the inorganic ber and projecting therefrom to a greater effective diameter in the strand than the inorganic fiber. The invention also includes textile fabrics broadly, woven, knitted, plied and laminated from the strands of the invention into sheets, webbing, belts, tapes, cordage and the like, which may be coated, laminated or otherwise treated by known methods to produce articles of improved utility or appearance.v l

Typical of the inorganic fibers useful in the invention are glass fibers produced in the known way o-f any desired dimensions, composition and color. Other inorganic fibers suitable for luse in the invention are asbestos fibers, mineral Wool fibers, and metallic fibers or wires.

The organic plastics useful in the invention may be selected from a wide variety of classes of organic resins and elastomers including cellulose esters and 'ethers; polymerization and copoly merization products of olenic compounds, such as vinyl compounds, styrene, acrylic acid and its derivatives; synthetic or artificial rubber colmpositions, such as polymerized dienes and the various modifications thereof, rubber halides and hydrohalides, and chloroprene; urea, thiourea, and melamine-aldehyde resins; phenol-aldehyde resins; glycerol-polybasic acid resins; polycarboxylic amide condensation products; and mixtures of two or more resins or elastomers. The plastics may include suitable plasticizers, pigments, fillers and other modifying agents well 2 be made in a wide variety of ways, such as by plying or .twisting together one or more threads or fibers of inorganic material and one or more threads or bers of organic plastic. In forming the strands by twisting, it is desirable that the relative tensions on the inorganic and on the plastic fibers be such that in the finished strand Ithe plastic fibers or threads overlie or project in the strand beyond the effective diameter of the inorganic fiber or bers in the strand. If the final fiber or thread diameter o-f the plastic is the same as or less than that of the inorganic fiber or thread, the tensions should be such that the plastic fiber is given a substantially greater twist. If the nal diameter of the plastic fiber is greater than tha-t of the inorganic fiber, the twist of the plastic fiber may be the same or less than that of the inorganic fiber. The plastic fiber may be twistedor plied in a multip-le of directions with respect to the inorganic fiber.

The organic plastic composition may also be applied to the inorganicber in the form of discontinuous or discrete elements, such as short fiber lengths, or in smallmounds or strips, or in any other way which will provide on a portion only of the surface of the inorganic fiber or fibers forming the base of the strand projecting organic plastic material which in an eventual fabric will separate the inorganic fibers of juxtaposed strands and lubricate or float the inorganic fibers in the fabric structure so as to release the full strength of the inorganic fibers 4while preventing abrasion of juxtaposed fibers, thereby enhancing the strength, iiexibility and durability ofv the fabric structure. The projecting organic plastic fibers or elements of the strand or fabric also provide an ideal base for attachment of coating compositions both by increasing the adhesiveness of the surface of the strands by the related chemical composition of the projecting plastic to the coating composition and by providing an. effective mechanical interlocking by virtue of the channels and projections formed by the .plastic on the strand surface.

The invention will be more particularly described With reference to the accompanying drawing showing illustrative embodiments of th principles of the invention.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is an enlarged diagrammatic represen` tation of a composite strand embodying the prinyciples of the invention; y

Fig. 2 is a cross-section of the composite strand of Fig. 1; f

Fig. 3 is an enlarged diagrammatic representation of another embodiment of the invention;

Figs. 4, 5 and 6 are enlarged diagrammatic views of further embodiments of the invention;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged diagrammatic plan view of a fabric of the invention, and

Figs. 8 and 9 are enlarged diagrammatic crosssections of coated fabrics of the invention.

In the figures, the Aorganic plastic elements or fibers are stippled to distinguish them from the inorganic fibers of the strand.

In the strand shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the inorganic ber IIJ and the organic plastic fiber It* are of substantially the same diameter and the plastic liber is caused to project to a greater diameter in the strand by giving it a greater idegree of twist in the strand, for example, by silbjecting the inorganic fiber to greater tension than the plastic liber while twisting the two fibers into the Strand.

In the strand of Fig. 3, the organic plastic liber I I has a greater fiber diameter than the inorganic ber I vso that when twisted into a strand at substantially the same tension the plastic liber projects to a greater distance in the strand than the inorganic fiber. In forming strands of the type shown in Fig. 3, the organic plastic fiber at the time of plying into the strand maybe of the same size or even smaller than the inorganic fiber and thereafter swollen to greater size by a suitable treatment such as by heating or by treating with a swelling agent.

In the strands of Figs. 4 and 5, organic plastic fibers Il are plied or twisted about substantially straight inorganic bers i0. A plurality of plastic fibers of different directions of twist may be utilized, as in Fig. 5.

'I'he strand of Fig. 6 is illustrative of a variety of possible forms of the invention in which discrete elements of organic plastic material II. are' applied to the surface of an inorganic ber il).

Fig. 7 shows diagrammatically how the organic plastic elements II of the invention act to separate and lubricate, while at the same time interbonding the inorganic fibers in the fabric structure so as to 'make available the full tensile strength of the inorganic nbers while preventing their abrasion and improving the flexibility and hand of the fabric. It will be obvious that the same combined lubricating and bonding action will be eiective When the strands of the invention are interplied, interwoven, knitted or interlaced in any direction and according to any pattern. The inorganicfibers constituting the basis of the fabric will not be in direct contact at any point, although maintaining to the maximum their characteristic strength and resistance.

Figs. 8 and 9 illustrate in diagrammatic crosssection a fabric of the general type of Fig. 7

coated with a coating composition I2, for example, a natural or synthetic rubber compound.

In Fig. B the fabric is shown with the inorganic fibers I0 and the organic plastic fibers II projecting from the plane of the section to illustrate more clearly how the organic plastic elements of the invention bond the coating composition to the .plastic structure both by the greater inherent adhesion of the plastic elements and by the mechanical interlocking which is in dicated, for example, at I3.

It will be clear from the foregoing description and examples that the construction and arrange-v ment of the elements of the strands and fabrics may be widely varied without departing from the principles of the invention as defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A composite textile strand comprising at least one inorganic fiber and discrete elements of an organic plastic composition covering a portion only of the surface of said inorganic fiber and projecting therefrom to a greater effective diameter in the strand than the inorganic fiber.

2. A textile fabric comprising a plurality of inorganic bers separated from each other in the fabric by discrete elements of organic plastic composition covering a portion only of the surface of the inorganic fiber.

3. A composite textile strand comprising at least one glass ber and discrete elements of an organic plastic composition covering a portion only of the surface of said glass fiber and projecting therefrom to a greater effective diameter in the strand than the glass fiber.

4. A textile fabric comprising a plurality of glass fibers Separated from each other in the fabric by discrete elements of organic plastic composition covering a portion only of the surface of the glass fiber,

5. A composite textile strand comprising at least one siliceous ber and discrete elements of an organic plastic composition covering a portion only of the surface of said siliceous fiber and projecting therefrom to a greater effective diameter in the strand than the siliceous fiber.

6. A textile fabric comprising a plurality of siliceous fibers separated from each other in the fabric by discrete elements of organic plastic composition covering a portion only of the surface of the siliceous fibers.

7. A textile fabric comprising a plurality of inorganic bers-separated from each other in the fabric by discrete elements of organic plastic composition covering a portion only of the surface of the inorganic fibers, and a coating composition bonded to said inorganic fibers by said organic plastic composition.

8. A textile fabric comprising a plurality of siliceous bers separated from each other in the fabric by discrete elements of organic plastic composition covering a portion only of the surface of the siliceous fibers, and a coating composition bonded to said siliceous fibers by said organic plastic composition.

9. A textile fabric comprising a plurality of glass fibers separated from each other in the fabric by discrete elements of organic plastic composition covering a portion only of the surface of the glass fibers, and a coating composition bonded to said glass fibers by said organic plastic composition.

ARCHIBALD H. DAVIS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS France Nov. 16, 1929

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US2200946 *Sep 16, 1937May 14, 1940Godfrey BlochFabric-making material
US2306781 *Jul 17, 1941Dec 29, 1942Sylvania Ind CorpProduct containing siliceous fibers and method of making the same
US2313058 *Jul 17, 1941Mar 9, 1943Sylvania Ind CorpTextile product and method of making the same
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2730790 *Dec 1, 1949Jan 17, 1956Monsanto ChemicalsTreatment of textile fibers
US2840882 *Jun 7, 1955Jul 1, 1958Darlington Fabrics CorpFibrous covering for elastic thread
US3090103 *Oct 24, 1957May 21, 1963Carborundum CoHeat resistant fibrous products containing ceramic fibers and method of making the same
US3109697 *Nov 3, 1959Nov 5, 1963Celanese CorpWet spinning of cellulose triester
US3148999 *Jul 18, 1962Sep 15, 1964Du PontProduct and process using novel binder means for non-woven fabrics
US3603071 *Apr 22, 1970Sep 7, 1971Goodyear Tire & RubberCords for annular reinforcing tire belts
US3729920 *Mar 6, 1970May 1, 1973Courtaulds LtdNovelty textile yarns
US3776293 *Jan 18, 1971Dec 4, 1973Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpReinforcement for tires
US4299884 *Dec 28, 1979Nov 10, 1981L. Payen & CieType of wrapped textile thread and process for its production which involves thermofusion to secure wrapping to core
US4430851 *Jan 29, 1982Feb 14, 1984Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyTwisted ceramic fiber sewing thread
US4893665 *Feb 17, 1988Jan 16, 1990The Goodyear Tire & Rubber CompanyCables for reinforcing deformable articles and articles reinforced by said cables
US5340648 *Feb 5, 1993Aug 23, 1994Kimberly-Clark CorporationElongated element comprising helically patterned adhesive
US5501756 *Mar 11, 1994Mar 26, 1996Kimberly-Clark CorporationElongated element comprising helically patterned adhesive
US5507909 *Apr 26, 1995Apr 16, 1996Kimberly-Clark CorporationApparatus for the manufacture of an elongated element comprising helically patterned adhesive
US5633075 *Jul 7, 1994May 27, 1997Raychem LimitedComposite material
US5645906 *Jul 15, 1994Jul 8, 1997Raychem LimitedRadially-recoverable sleeve of composite
US5756206 *Mar 15, 1995May 26, 1998Custom Composite Materials, Inc.Flexible low bulk pre-impregnated tow
US5902956 *Aug 2, 1996May 11, 1999Parker-Hannifin CorporationEMI shielding gasket having a conductive sheating consolidated with a thermoplastic member
US5996220 *Jun 12, 1998Dec 7, 1999Parker-Hannifin CorporationMethod of terminating an EMI shielding gasket
US6077375 *Apr 15, 1998Jun 20, 2000Illinois Tool Works Inc.Elastic strand coating process
US6462267Jul 19, 1999Oct 8, 2002Parker-Hannifin CorporationEMI shielding gasket having a consolidated conductive sheathing
US6509089Apr 26, 1995Jan 21, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Garment incorporating an adhesive-wrapped elastic strand
US6719846Sep 28, 2001Apr 13, 2004Nordson CorporationDevice and method for applying adhesive filaments to materials such as strands or flat substrates
US6863225Mar 13, 2001Mar 8, 2005Nordson CorporationDevice and method for applying adhesive to materials such as strands
US20010022155 *Mar 13, 2001Sep 20, 2001Yukio NakamuraDevice and method for applying adhesive to materials such as strands
Classifications
U.S. Classification442/187, 57/238, 156/172, 428/323, 57/229, 57/240, 428/375, 442/198, 428/392, 428/372
International ClassificationD02G3/28, D02G3/18, D02G3/38
Cooperative ClassificationD02G3/182, D02G3/38, D02G3/32
European ClassificationD02G3/18B, D02G3/38, D02G3/28